The New Field Service Workforce

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There has been a dramatic shift over the past 5 to 10 years in the way work is performed in the U.S. and Europe as more and more workers join the gig economy.  By definition, a gig economy is an environment where temporary positions are common and organizations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements.  In other words, people are increasingly taking on freelance work.

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 53 million Americans are currently working as freelancers.  By 2020, 50% of the American workforce will be engaged in freelance activity. Furthermore, a study published by the Freelancers Union and Elance O-Desk indicates that freelance work contributes $750 billion annually to the US economy.

The gig economy has played a significant role within the Field Service Industry.  It is driven by the trend of many companies to implement variable workforce (VWF) models. This is a business model in which a field service organization (FSO) relies on a contingent workforce to manage peaks and valleys in labor demand.  Earlier this year, Blumberg Advisory conducted an extensive research study to examine the impact of VWF models on the Field Service Industry. The study, sponsored by Field Nation, revealed  that 8 out of 10 FSOs have implemented VWF models to manage over one-half (53%) of their workforces.

One of the ways that FSOs implement the VWF model is through a Freelancer Management System (FMS).  This is an integrated software platform that includes functionality for Vendor Management System (VMS), Human Capital Management System (HCMS), Service Ticketing System, on-line recruitment tools, and reporting & analytics. Approximately two-thirds of survey respondents use this type of solution to manage their contingent labor pool of field technicians.

The single biggest benefit of using an FMS, as reported by 70% of survey respondents, is scalability.  In other words, the ability to scale the workforce up or down based on service demands.   A majority of respondents also perceive access to a vibrant marketplace of freelance technicians (61%), the flexibility that an FMS has in managing W2 and 1099 employees (56%), and lower cost of overhead (54%) that results from using an FMS, among the top benefits.  Just under half of the respondents (46%) viewed lower direct labor cost as a benefit of using an FMS platform.

In addition to these benefits, FMS platforms have a measurable impact on field service financial and operating performance.  Indeed, companies that use FMS platforms report having observed a 6% or more improvement in field service key performance indicators (KPIs) such as field service productivity (i.e., # of visits per day), labor utilization rates, SLA compliance, recurring revenue, and gross margins.

Obviously, the gig economy has had a positive impact on FSOs who rely on the VWF model and FMS platforms.  However, many opponents of the gig economy believe that freelancing models take advantage of workers and therefore are bad for individuals.  The facts point to the contrary. In 2015, Field Nation, a leading FMS platform provider to the field service industry, conducted a survey among freelance workers to understand their attitudes and perceptions of freelance work.  An overwhelming majority indicated that the freelance lifestyle is both a personnel choice (88%) and their primary source of income (73%).  Almost all the respondents were satisfied with the work they do (97%) and the career choice they had made (95%).

These findings suggest that the nature of work within the Field Service Industry has changed for good. The days of individual commitment to a single employer and vice versa are long gone.  Freelancing is not a passing fad within Field Service .  Furthermore, Freelancer Management System (FMS) platforms make it possible for FSOs to achieve positive, measurable results from implementing a Variable Workforce Model. Clearly, the gig economy is here to stay.

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To obtain a copy of our new ground breaking report on benchmarks and best practices in field service staffing click here.

Excellent Advice About Leadership

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In this week’s blog I am sharing an article written by Suzen Leen. She is Head of Marketing at Kap Computer Solutions Pvt. Ltd.,AP, a pioneer in BULK SMS Solutions.If you are interested in writing a guest post for my blog, please check out my Guest Posting Guidelines

Following your instincts when it comes to leadership is a good thing to do, but you also must continue to learn and know what a good leader does. It goes both ways, and this article will help you figure out what it takes for you to be the leader that is required. Not only will you improve as a leader, but you will help other people.

Make sure to engage people as a leader. You must learn how to motivate, involve, and excite others. Inspire them to engage their passions, strengths, skills, and creativity in the tasks at hand. Do what you can to acknowledge and appreciate each person’s contributions and efforts. You should make them all feel like they did something to move the project forward.

Effective leaders are inspiring. You need to develop the ability to inspire those who work under you, motivating them to work toward a common goal. You can use public speaking to achieve this, but there are also videos, blogs, articles and other methods to convey your uplifting message to your audience.

Good leaders know how to nurture growth in other people. Take the time to support other people. You can do this by learning their strengths, work styles, and passions. Try encouraging them to seek new possibilities and challenges. Remember that every person has the ability to expand the potential of the company.

As a leader, you must have confidence. This will, in turn, instill confidence in your team. If your team sees you doubt yourself, they will begin to doubt you too. Always act deliberately and do not waver, but do not be afraid to change your mind. A good leader is flexible.

One of the most important aspects of any leader is the ability to create a sense of trust among their employees. Employees who trust their supervisor are willing to do more to help the company succeed than those who do not trust their supervisors. Always be truthful when dealing with employees.

Be sure to finish everything you start or you risk losing the respect of the people that work under you. Even if something seems particularly difficult, you should give it your all and see it through to the end. No one will look at you the same if you turn into a quitter.

Be a communicator. Communication is a major aspect of what makes great leadership. If you can’t communicate your goals and vision, then what is there for your employees to follow at all? If you have a tendency to “loan wolf” at work, break out of that habit and begin communicating with your teams.

You should also use Bulk SMS Marketing for instant results, so that you can communicate with thousands of people with a single click https://kapsystem.com can provide you the best Bulk SMS Marketing, even you can also use our API to use it anywhere in any software.

Are you interested in growing your service business? Check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing ™. As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here.

I’d love to hear your feedback or answer any questions you may have.

What Do Pokémon Go and Service Lifecycle Management Have in Common?

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Augmented Reality (AR) became a physical reality earlier this month when Nintendo launched its Pokémon Go application. This is the first example of a consumer based, augmented reality application that can be downloaded free on any Android or iOS device.  According to Vox Examiner, “Pokémon Go is a game that uses your phone’s GPS and clock to detect where and when you are in the game and make Pokémon “appear” around you (on your phone screen) so you can go and catch them. As you move around, different and more types of Pokémon will appear depending on where you are and what time it is. The idea is to encourage you to travel around the real world to catch Pokémon in the game.”

Many analysts believed that consumer applications for AR would not hit the market until 2017.   Nintendo was ahead of schedule.  Pokémon is taking the world by storm and fueling the market for  AR applications, a market that Digi-Capital reports will reach $90 billion by 2020.  Goldman Sachs estimates that 60% of the AR market will be driven by consumer applications, with the remaining 40% of the market attributable to enterprise usage.

In case you have not been paying attending to technology trends, AR provides a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment and then augments (or supplements) this view with computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data.  The technology functions by enhancing one’s current perception of reality.  AR improves  users’ experience by enabling them to interact and learn from whatever they are observing.

Prior to the launch of Pokémon Go, AR applications where limited to the enterprise market.  I saw an example of a real-world-use case for AR at PTC’s LiveWorx ’16 last month in Boston.  At this conference and exhibition, PTC provided a proof of concept of how AR can be utilized within the context of Service Lifecycle Management.  In conjunction with their customer FlowServe, a leading manufacturer of pump and valves for process industries, PTC demonstrated an integrated solution which provides users with a better experience when it comes to operating, maintaining, and managing centrifugal pumps.  Sensors on the pump identify when an anomaly is detected.  Using AR, a virtual representation of the machine is placed on top of the device to expose the root cause of the problem.  AR is then utilized to identify the exact steps that need to be taken to resolve the problem.

By implementing AR solutions, companies can expect to realize significant improvements in key performance indicators related to Service Lifecycle Management.  For example, AR can help equipment operators anticipate and/or avoid machine failures and thus increase equipment uptime.  AR can also facilitate repair processes, thereby reducing both repair time and downtime while improving first time fix.  In addition, AR can improve the learning curve of novice field technicians, enabling them to become more proficient in diagnosing and resolving problems.  Furthermore, the contextual knowledge that is made available through AR enables equipment owners to make smarter decisions about operating the equipment, which  in turn can help extend the equipment’s life.

These results are only possible if field service technicians embrace AR and actively utilize it.  How likely are technicians to embrace this technology? This of course is the big question on people’s mind.  One scenario is that AR adoption will be very high, so high that technicians will become dependent on it.  The implication is that technicians will lose their domain expertise and be unable to resolve problems without it.  This could pose a challenge if for some reason the AR interface is not working properly and the machine still has a problem that requires resolution.  This outcome can be avoided through ongoing education, training, and skill-assessment drills.

A more likely scenario is that adoption rates will occur gradually.  Although technicians may embrace the use of AR in consumer applications, they may have some resistance to using it in a technical environment.  This is because AR requires technicians to modify their workflow and perceptions of themselves as problem solvers.  Technicians have been conditioned to rely on their own experience, intuition, and “tribal knowledge” to solve problems.  AR changes that basic premise.  Technicians will have to remember to activate AR applications when they are in the field and rely on the information that is presented to them to complete the task at hand. They’ll also need to become proficient at analyzing and acting upon the information they observe.  These activities are not second nature and may take some getting used to for veteran technicians because it represents a different way of working and a challenge to their conventional way of thinking.  Companies that want to leverage the value of AR can overcome these challenges by managing technicians’ performance against key performance indicators (KPIs).  They can observe who on their team is using AR and evaluate the impact on performance. They can in turn incentivize and reward good performance as well as identify who needs more training and coaching on the use of AR.

Got a question? Click to schedule  a consultation.

3D Printing and The Digitization Of Field Service

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This blog post has been reprinted with the permission of Field Technologies Online.

3D printing has received a great deal of attention by the media in recent months as this technology is rapidly being adopted in a broad array of market segments. Also known as additive layer manufacturing (ALM), 3D printing creates items using computer-aided design (CAD) and then builds them by adding thin layers of powder, melted plastic, aluminum, or other materials on top of each other. 3D printing requires fewer traditional raw materials and produces up to 90 percent less waste then traditional manufacturing. As a result, 3D printing is less costly. Furthermore, 3D printing enables companies to compress the supply chain and cycle time associated with bringing products to market.

The Role Of 3D Printing In Field Service
Indeed, 3D printing is a hot market. According to Canalys Research, the global market for 3D printers is estimated to reach $20.2 billion by 2019. This represents a sixfold increase from 2014 when the market was only $3.3 billion. Fueling this growth is the fact that 3D printers are becoming more affordable and mainstream. Given this trend, it is no wonder that the field service industry is quickly developing use cases for this technology. One example is Siemens, which uses 3D printing to make replacement parts for gas turbines. Rather than waiting weeks for an ordered spare part to arrive, Siemens can print the part and ship same day. As a result, Siemens has lowered repair time by 90 percent, which means less downtime per customer when it comes to gas turbines.

Another use case that has been proposed involves equipping service vans with 3D printers, permitting field engineers to print replacement parts on demand. This may not be practical or feasible. Many companies are moving toward variable workforce models and cutting back on company-owned vehicles. Even though 3D printing is faster than traditional manufacturing, it still requires a lot of time to print certain types of parts. This means that service calls would be extended, leading to longer customer downtime and lower productivity for the field service organization (FSO). 3D printing is also not a one-size-fits-all solution and can’t print complex parts. 3D printers vary according to the types of additive manufacturing methods employed, the types of materials utilized, and the size of the product manufactured. Unless all replacement parts have the same specifications, an FSO would need to install multiple printers in each van, which would add to the balance sheet and overhead expense structure of FSOs.

Despite these shortcomings, the concept of pushing the 3D printing closer to the customer and shortening the supply chain is very compelling. To capitalize on this idea, UPS has launched a full-scale, on-demand 3D printing manufacturing network. This network will leverage UPS’ existing global logistics network by embedding the On-Demand Production Platform and 3D Printing Factory from Fast Radius in 60 of UPS’ U.S.-based The UPS Store locations. UPS will also partner with SAP to build an end-to-end offering that marries SAP’s supply chain software with UPS’ on-demand manufacturing and global logistics network. This will simplify the production process from parts digitization and certification, order-to-manufacturing, and delivery. Now UPS’ customers can manufacture parts in the quantity they need, when they need them, and where they need them.

One of the most fascinating aspects of this solution is that instead of trying to force innovation (i.e., 3D printing) into our traditional way of thinking about spare parts management (i.e., in-house parts networks), UPS has turned service parts logistics into an on-demand economy business a la Uber. Under this model, the value for the FSO is not in the physical assets it manages (e.g., parts, 3D printers), but in the digital assets (e.g., designs, drawings, etc.) it owns. Eventually, developments in nanotechnology will enable 3D printing of all types of parts, even complex ones like microprocessors and capacitors. This creates the potential for FSOs to transform themselves into asset-light businesses. As a result they can deliver a better return on investment, lower profit volatility, greater flexibility, and higher scalability, things that weren’t possible a few years ago. UPS is of course an early entrant to the on-demand market for 3D printing. Look for more companies to offer similar solutions in the near future.

Have a question? Click to schedule a consultation.

Are you interested in growing your service business? Check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing ™. As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here.

Turbocharge Your Service Business

Maximize Revenue through Market Research

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In my last series of blog posts I wrote about what it takes to build a Successful Service Marketing™ program.  To review, I described the strategic concepts of service marketing and introduced you to the 7 Ps. These are of course very important concepts. However, there are a few more concepts you’ll need to master if you are going to win at service marketing. If you’re going to be successful at service marketing or any kind of marketing, even if it is product marketing, you have to have good knowledge of your market.  You get that knowledge through market research. If you know who buys, what they buy, and why they buy then you can sell more to them and get them to buy more often.

Market research also provides the insight needed to communicate effectively with your current and prospective customers. It helps determine what messages, what images, what ideas will resonate with them and get their interest to want to buy from you.  Marketing is about taking a need and converting it into a want. You may need a watch to tell time but you want a Rolex because of the status and prestige associated with owning one.  So when you have really good market research of who buys, what they buy and why buy, then you can construct your message in such a way that you turn a need to a want.   In the field service world, you customers may need to know that they can get service on their equipment when it is down but what they really want is a guaranteed Service Level Agreement with a 4-hour response time.

Good market research not only helps in creating a service portfolio your customers really want but it helps in developing an optimal pricing strategy for that portfolio.  Chances are that you are familiar with cost plus and competitive pricing strategies. With cost plus pricing, you calculate what it costs to deliver service and then mark it up by an amount to cover you profit.  With competitive pricing strategies, you conduct market research to find out what your competitors are charging and then price your services at a lower amount.

A third type of pricing strategy is called value-in-use pricing. It basically involves measuring the economic value or loss to the customer of not having the service available in a timely manner.  This can be significant.  For example, a manufacturing facility may lose millions of dollars every hour its machines are down.  Therefore, they may be willing to a pay premium for faster service.  Market research can help you understand your customers’ value-in-use and determine whether or not you should pursue a cost plus, competitive, or value-in-use pricing strategy.   You’ll need to understand all three pricing strategies and how to effectively leverage market research to maximize service revenue and optimize profits.

The final aspect that you have to master to win service marketing is called ‘‘Invisible Selling”. This is based on the premise that you win business not by pushing your offers onto prospects, but by pulling customers towards you. One of the ways you pull customers to you is through indirect marketing as opposed to direct selling.  What’s an example of indirect marketing?  It’s an article or white paper that demonstrates that your company understands the problems that companies in your market are experiencing and that you have solutions to these problems.  It’s about using social media and public speaking opportunities to influence others to want have a conversation with you to learn more about what you do, and how you can help them.   It’s about positioning you and your company as experts and trusted business partners.   By the way, seeding your thought-leadership content with market-research data is a sure-fire way to build credibility with current and prospective customers.  Once you establish credibility they follow you and then it’s only a matter of time until they become your customers.

When you put all the elements of a Successful Service Marketing™  program together, when you fully understand the strategic concepts of service marketing, when you effectively apply the seven principles of service marketing, when you learn how to optimally price your services, when you use market research effectively, and implement an invisible selling strategy, you’re going to experience incredible results.  Your marketing program will be extremely successful, your sales will take off, and your business will skyrocket.

If you are really interested in achieving extraordinary results, then check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing ™. As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here

Got a question? Click to schedule  a consultation.

The Service Marketing Mix

Understanding the 7 Principles

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One of the reasons service executives struggle when attempting to grow their businesses is they try to apply product-marketing concepts to service marketing. This is like trying to hammer a square peg into a round hole.  The 4 P’s marketing mix is one such concept that works great for products but not for services.  It’s based on the theory that the success of a company’s marketing program is based on how well the company manages strategies and tactics related to product (i.e., design, form/factor, etc.), price, promotion (e.g., sales, advertising, etc.), and place (i.e., distribution).

The problem is that these 4 P’s do not apply to services. First, service products are intangible and difficult to describe.  This begs the question, how can you promote something that is difficult to describe?  Another problem for service marketers is that place has a very fuzzy connotation in service marketing because there are multiple entities involved in service distribution. Sometimes they cooperate, other times they collaborate, and still other times they compete.  Services can be offered by one entity, ordered through another, and delivered by a third.  Without well-defined product, promotion and place strategies, all that is left is price and that becomes a slippery slope for service marketing.  Sales and marketing can never be just about prices because customers will always find a way to negotiate price.  In product marketing, the 4 P’s makes it possible for a seller to justify the price.

For the past 20 years, I’ve devoted a great deal of time and resources to understanding this dilemma, in the process developing my own theory about service marketing.  I determined that a Successful Service Marketing™ mix is actually based not on 4 but on 7 key principles.  These principles are:

  1. PORTFOLIO: Often described in terms of a service-level commitment, such as 24/7 with a four-hour response time. The more distinctions you can make to define your service portfolio, the more likely you will be to fulfill the needs of prospective customers.
  2.  PROVIDER: Tangible elements of your service infrastructure, such as your call center, self-service portals, enterprise systems and service technology that make it possible to deliver on the promise of your service portfolio.
  3. PROCESS: The steps your customer must take to request the service, and the tasks that occur to deliver the service. For example, performing front-end call screening and diagnostics before dispatching a field technician.
  4. PERFORMANCE: Evidence that you can deliver on your promise, such as KPIs, customer satisfaction results and customer testimonials.
  5. PERCEPTION: Your ability to win business and retain satisfied customers is based on your ability to influence their perception of you. This goes beyond simply promotion through advertising, branding, and communications. It gets to the essence of who you are, what you stand for, and how you portray yourself in the market.
  6. PLACE: Services distribution channels can be complex.   Quite often, consumers can purchase service from one place, order or request it from another place, and have it delivered to them at a third place (e.g., onsite, depot, remote, etc.).  Sometimes it’s the same company delivering this service. Other times it’s not.  Regardless, the service marketing mix must deal with these complexities.
  7. PRICE: Of course, there is always the issue of price. The important thing to remember is that price is a function of value in use and perception that consumers have about your company (i.e., expertise, experience, capability).

Many people have asked me why I haven’t included “People” as one of the Ps in my service marketing mix.  While people are important to the success of any endeavor, I feel very strongly that their ability to deliver exceptional results is a function of the 7 Ps that I’ve identified above and not the other way around.  Ordinary people can achieve extraordinary results when there are great strategies and tools in place.

Please let me know what you liked about this blog and your key takeaways.  If you’ve found this blog of value and think your colleagues or business associates could benefit from it, kindly share it with them.

If you are really interested in achieving extraordinary results, then check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing™.As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here

 

Strategic Concepts that Fuel Revenue Growth

The Basics of Service Marketing Theory

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It probably comes as no surprise that service executives are often focused on finding ways to increase top line revenue, boost profits, and expand market share. Indeed, these are usually among the most important initiatives that service executives pursue when it comes to charting the future of their business.

In order to achieve results, service executives need to master three fundamental or strategic concepts about service marketing.  It is important to understand these strategic concepts because they form the underling theory of service marketing, and – as you will read below – theory is what forms the basis of our reality.  By understanding service marketing theory, you can shift your perspective from product marketing to service marketing. Without this shift you can never expect to implement a Successful Service Marketing™ strategy.

One of the most critical strategic concepts of service marketing is that perception is just as important as reality.  Ultimately, the perception that a customer has about a service provider is what influences their decision to work with that service provider.  In other words, customers buy both perception and reality.  As a service provider, you must influence their perception of your capabilities.  Customers need to trust that you have the capacity to deliver service before you actually deliver it.  It’s not just the actual service that they are buying that creates value; it’s your ability to manage their perception that creates value.  Perception is what sells; your performance is what keeps them coming back.  Reality must equal perception otherwise you will have an unhappy customer on your hands.

A second strategic concept that service marketers need to understand is that customers pay more for services over the lifetime of a product than they do when purchasing the product itself.  In fact, they may pay as much as 8-10 times more for services than what they originally pay for the product. This may seem like an absurd statement at first glance. However, consider the fact that the customer may own or operate a piece of equipment for five to ten years or more.  Over that period of time they may require a broad spectrum of services ranging from installations, to remote support, to field service, to replacement parts, to training, and so on.  Clearly the dollars can add up over time.

The third concept has to do with understanding the relationship between “value in use” and time.  Value in use is about understanding the cost to your customer in absence of the service.  This is typically a function of time. Some services are mission critical.  If they are not performed in a timely manner, the customer may lose a lot of money by not having the service available.  You need to understand value in use in order to effectively price your services and articulate the value of what you can provide.  Most services are valued in terms of time. That’s because downtime equals money lost in the service world. The longer it takes to obtain service, the more costly it becomes for the customer.  The quicker the service is performed, the more valuable it is to the customer.  By understanding your customers’ wants from the standpoint of time, you can develop service offerings that meet these needs.  Furthermore, if you can meet the strictest of time requirements, than you can command a premium price for your service particularly if it is on a mission-critical product or application.

By mastering these strategic concepts you will begin to observe a shift in the way you think about service marketing.  This shift will help you become more effective in implementing marketing strategies that lead to higher revenues, greater profits, and increased profit share.  If you are really interested in achieving these outcomes, then check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing. ™ As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here.  I am also providing a $100 discount on the purchase of this course during the month of May.  To take advantage of this discount, enter code SMK100 when you register.

Please let me know what you liked about this blog and your key takeaways.  If you’ve found this blog of value and think your colleagues or business associates could benefit from it, kindly share it with them.

Keys to Successful Service Marketing

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Service Marketing was a relatively new concept when I began my consulting career back in the 1980s.   High-tech service companies were just starting to run as profit centers and focus on marketing their services.  As a result, there was very little attention placed on service marketing in business schools at that time. The emphasis was on product marketing.  All the marketing literature and textbooks, all the courses, and all the conventional wisdom on the topic of marketing were centered on products.  I learned very early in my career that it is extremely difficult to market services using product-marketing ideas.  It was like trying to hammer a square peg into a round hole!

I really wanted to help my clients solve their service-marketing challenges so I began an amazing journey of helping these clients discover, develop, and implement best practices for successful service marketing.  First, I learned as much as I could about product marketing and then looked at which aspects applied to service marketing and which didn’t.  Basically, I reverse engineered product marketing to determine lessons I could learn when it came to a different kind of marketing altogether.

Second, I identified companies who already were doing a good job at service marketing. In other words, they had already gone a long way to crack the code of service marketing.  I researched what they were doing well and advised clients to model their success on these early exemplars.  In essence, I bench-marked the best practices in service marketing and then showed my clients how to implement them.

Third, I found in one individual a great teacher, mentor, and coach who helped me excel at service marketing.  That person was my late father, Donald Blumberg.  A prolific author and speaker on the subject of service strategy, he taught me what it takes to build a profitable service business and guided me in establishing my own perspectives on service marketing.

As a result of our collaboration, I developed my own understandings about successful service marketing.  I started to write articles and give speeches on service marketing, which led to more consulting work, which in turn led to greater learning on my part.  Over time, I became an expert at service marketing as I helped my clients increase revenues, boost profit margins, and improve market share.

I’m sharing this information because I want you to know that you can achieve these results, too.  More importantly, you can accomplish them in a fraction of the time it took me.  You don’t need to spend years reverse engineering product marketing or bench-marking best practices.  Instead, I’ve created a new online training course that will provide you with strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing. ™ As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here.  I am also providing a $100 discount on the purchase of this course during the month of May.  To take advantage of this discount, enter code SMK100 when you register.

Please let me know what you liked about this blog and your key takeaways.  If you’ve found this blog of value and think your colleagues or business associates could benefit from it, then kindly share it with them.

 

Why Businesses Need to Adopt Mobile Marketing Plans Today

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This guest blog post was written by Sophorn Chhay. Sophorn is the marketing guy at Trumpia, the most complete SMS software with mass mobile messaging, smart targeting and automation. Follow Sophorn on Twitter(@Trumpia)

Each year, mobile marketing grows stronger. The world currently hosts over 3.65 billion unique smartphone users. Industries are expanding rapidly, facilitating the consumer’s need for deep, dynamic mobile connectivity.

To stand out, companies need to rework communicative and marketing outreaches to play upon mobile’s far-reaching impact. Creating a winning campaign takes time, but actionable plans certainly exist. Check out the following reasons companies are opting for smartphone support, and double-check your brand’s strategy for a watertight platform capable of harnessing the power of mobile.

One: Mobile Interaction Boosts Reaction

In the past, Internet-based content was vital to a modern marketer’s toolkit. Businesses now, however, are relying on mobile contact for interaction. 58 percent of consumers experiencing one-way communication tell their friends and family about it. Dynamic feedback has become the norm, and real-time SMS strategies, strategically media outreach and mobile web support are laying the future’s foundation.

Two: Mobile Coupons are Highly Redeemable

In 2015, SMS-delivered coupons experienced an open rate 10 times higher than printed coupons. Mobile coupons are highly convenient, and their discounts are commonly sought by day-to-day consumers. Because SMS, again, is a two-way street, brands can create custom-tailored offers. Mobile coupons both attract and retain customers, opening the doors to ongoing loyalty rewards.

Three: Mobile Apps are Taking Over

Mobile apps have become preferred engagement platforms in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of American buyers are considered to be “mobile app addicts.” They install, on average, 17 apps per month. The mobile marketing industry’s inclination to boost customer involvement via apps is telling of the mobile world’s overall health. Mobile apps are quickly becoming advertisement breeding grounds, and companies holding an app-centric course are prospering.

Four: SMS is a Preferred Communication Platform

Over 205 billion emails are sent daily. Unfortunately, they’re being ignored for text messages. While email open rates vary by industry, most companies experience an average open rate of 20 to 40 percent. Texts, however, experience an astounding 90 percent open rate. Consumers are reading texts, and they’re engaging brands at deep, intuitive levels. After 2016, brands unable to enchant buyers by way of text will be more than a few steps behind. Sure, email is still a viable marketing tool, but it fails to compete against SMS’s inherent communicative power.

Five: MMS is Even Better than SMS

MMS messages strike more conversations than SMS messages do. Many mobile marketers are redefining their strategies upon media-centric engagement strategies. Viral videos offered through Facebook and YouTube might be effective—but few platforms can compete with texting.

MMS content is highly shareable. It’s preferred by mobile marketing’s biggest fan-base, too. Millennials are viewing, sharing, voting on and even creating mobile video content. While Snapchat sparked much of the MMS craze, it’s currently unable to content with several of the business world’s creative initiatives. Branded SMS messages have a limit of 160 characters, while MMS messages can jam-pack thousands of words within a single video. Check out this article, and find out how your MMS strategy compares to baseline SMS approaches.

It’s important to understand the mobile world’s trajectory. The Internet of Things, alongside much of the business world’s contingency on immediacy, has made smartphone-centric marketing incomparable. Your brand, your workers, your strategy and your consumer base need mobile connectivity. The smartphone has created a paradigm shift, and it’s hitting the professional world hard. Double-check your strategy, find a gap for mobile and expand a smartphone-centric plan from within.

What’s Next?

What do you think of what I’ve covered so far? Will you adopt mobile as your tool for marketing?  I would love to read your comments below.

Jumpstart your business by grabbing your free copy of Sophorn’s powerful Mobile Marketing Success Kit.

Big Data & Analytics – A Transformational Journey

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Last month I had the good fortune to attend the Reverse Logistics Sustainability Council (RLSC) and Warranty Chain Management (WCM) conferences.   Big Data & Analytics was a topic that gained much prominence at both of these conferences.  Indeed, this is a subject that is gaining much attention in business and academic circles these days.  Interestingly, there is a general consensus among academics and industry thought leaders that Big Data Analytics is one of the most misunderstood and misused terms in the business world.  For some business professionals, the term analytics applies specifically to performance metrics, for others it has to do with unstructured data sets and data lakes, while still others think it relates to predicting the future.

Big Data refers to the volume, velocity, and variety of data that a company has at their disposal. Analytics applies to the discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful patterns in data.  The truth is that there are actually four (4) different types of Big Data Analytics that firms can rely on to make business decisions.

  • Descriptive Analytics: This type of Analytics answers the question “What is happening?”  In a field service organization (FSO) this may be as simple as KPIs like SLA compliance or First Time Fix rate.  The exact measurement tells an FSO how well it is doing when it comes to fixing problems right the first time and meeting customer obligations for response time.
  • Diagnostic Analytics: Understanding what is happening is important, but it is even more important to understand why something is happening.  This is how managers and executives can identify and resolve problems before they get out of hand. Diagnostic Analytics provides this level of insight, for example by pin-pointing why First Time Fix Rate is low.  Maybe it’s because the company is making poor decisions about which Field Engineers (FEs) are dispatched to the customers’ sites.  Or, perhaps selected Field Engineers do not have access to the right parts when they arrive on site and must return for a second visit.
  • Predictive Analytics: Ok, so now we know why something is happening. Wouldn’t it also be good to know what is likely to happen next?  Predictive Analytics provides this level of insight. In other words, it provides a forecast about what may happen if a company continues to experience a low first time fix rate.  For example, it could show the specific impact on customer satisfaction or the measurable effect on service costs and/or gross margins.   In this case, Predictive Analytics helps a company understand with a high level of statistical confidence how long it may continue to maintain the status quo before financial problems may arise.
  • Prescriptive Analytics: The final component of analytics is Prescriptive A This level of information helps a company understand at a granular level of certainty exactly what it should do to resolve a current situation and avoid future problems.  For example, Prescriptive Analytics may reveal that a company must ensure the field engineer has the right parts on hand prior to being dispatched to arriving at the customer site.  The Analytics can show which parts must be available and where they should be located.

In summary, Analytics takes the guesswork out of decision-making.  Instead of relying on intuition or prior experience, service executives can make sound business decisions based on objective analysis of data.  As a result, the probability of making the right decision increases.   Relying on Analytics to drive business decisions involves a transformational journey.  As innovative as it seems, a company cannot just start using Predictive or Prescriptive Analytics. It must first become proficient with Descriptive Analytics before it can leverage the power of more advanced analytic models.    This journey is not just about the data.  Many managers mistakenly believe that they must have enough of the right data to make Analytics work.  The truth is that we all have a wealth of data at our disposal.  Our challenge is finding the tools and technology to process the data, making Analytics a winning business proposition.  This begs the question: does your service organization have an optimal system in place to harness the power of Analytics?  If you are not certain, it may be time to conduct an audit and assessment of your infrastructure.  To learn more, schedule a free consultation today.