Digital Transformation Trend: Changing “Business as Usual”

The following is an excerpt from an article we wrote for XM Reality.  You can get a copy of the full article here http://resources.xmreality.com/blumberg-new-reality/

customer service

Perhaps the trend that is having the greatest influence on the adoption of AR/VR/MR platforms is not the affordability or stability of the technology but the commitment by today’s leading corporations to embrace Digital Transformation (DX). Rather than utilizing technologies simply to streamline and automate existing business processes and transactions, digital transformation means utilizing technological innovation such AR/VR/MR to change the very way business is conducted, resulting in new business models and cultures.

DX has had an overwhelmingly positive impact on the performance of companies that have pursued this strategy. In fact, in some instances it has resulted in a winner take all scenario. According to Constellation Research Founder and Principal Analyst Ray Wang, “digital leaders in almost every industry are taking 40% to 70% of the overall market share and 23% to 57% of profits. In some markets, if there are one or two major players, they are taking up to 77% of the profits”.

These findings suggest that DX could lead to a “zero-sum” game for selected field service providers. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that businesses across a wide range of industry segments are investing heavily in DX technologies. Indeed, worldwide spending on DX is estimated to approach $1.2 trillion by 2017 year-end, according to International Data Corporation, an increase of 17.8% over 2016. IDC predicts this market will continue to grow at a steady rate of 17.9% over the next three years, reaching $2.0 trillion by 2020.

Most business experts and industry pundits agree that DX investments have the greatest impact on a company’s performance when they achieve two major objectives. First, they make business operations more responsive by leveraging digitally connected product-service offerings, people, and assets. Second, they lead to innovations that transform how customers, partners, employees, and things communicate with each other. For field service organizations, the outcome of meeting these objectives incudes a more enabled workforce, enhanced customer experience, and improved overall collaboration and performance.

Clearly, AR/VR/MR technology is well suited to meet these objectives and deliver outcomes. At a macro level, it changes the way field service business is conducted, by bringing a problem to the expert rather than the other way around. As a result, it shortens the time it takes to resolve a customer’s issue and avoids the high costs associated with sending a technician to the customer site. In addition, it helps FSOs overcome resource constraints. For example, utilizing this technology, a technician at a customer site can simultaneously offer remote support to a second customer at another location. Furthermore, the technology facilitates greater collaboration and performance among technicians. A “top-gun” technician with deep domain knowledge and expertise can provide remote guidance to a less experienced, “novice” engineer. Technicians can also use annotations as part of AR sessions to overcome language barriers that may exist between people in different geographic regions. Lastly, AR/VR/MR provides an immersive experience to the customer, enhancing their experience and enabling them to be self-reliant when it comes to resolving basic issues.

In many ways, AR/VR/MR pushes the boundaries of possibilities when it comes to providing high quality and efficient services and support to end customers. By overcoming limitations, FSOs experience improved performance in the areas of first time fix, remote call resolution rates, mean time to repair, and cost per service call. While effective field service leaders have always been committed to continuously improving performance in these areas, AR/VR/MR provides the technology to make step-wise (e.g., exponential) improvements as opposed to only incremental gains.

AR/VR/MR brings additional value in its ability to positively influence and enhance customer satisfaction as well as generate new and profitable sources of revenue for FSOs. For example, many early FSO adopters have been able to monetize their investment in this technology by offering AR/VR/MR enabled remote support sessions as a value-added, fee-based service to customers. These examples clearly demonstrate why FSOs should give serious consideration to deploying an AR/VR/MR solution today.

Call Michael for a FREE 30 minute Consultation

Plan Today for an Amazing Future Tomorrow

I love this time of the year.  It’s not just because of the holiday season and the chance to spend time with friends and family.  I like this time of the year because it gives me time to reflect on the past 12 months and set goals for the next 12.   Goal setting can be daunting task for many of us.   Quite often people set goals without giving thought to the impact they have on various parts of their life.  For example, they might set a goal for one aspect of their life only to learn several months latter that while they achieved this goal other areas are suffering like their health, relationship, or finances.

You might be wondering why I am writing goal setting in a blog devoted to business issues. Why am I concerned with this topic? Why should you be concerned with it too?  The answer is that I am a big proponent of goal setting. It is required if we are going to obtain any results in our life.  More importantly, I believe that how we show up in one area of our life impacts how we show up in other areas of our life.   For example, our ability to advance in business may be directly related to our relationships at home or vice versa.

The truth is that we can design an amazing life for ourselves and “run on all cylinders” as I like to refer to the feeling of success and fulfillment in all areas of our life.   Effective goal setting, requires that we first assess each part of our life and determine where we need to achieve better results.   If our health is at a 10 and our relationships are at a 6, doesn’t it make sense to set some goals in this area rather then spending more time at the gym.

Basically, if we are going to make progress in the key areas of our life we need to head the adage …. “What you don’t measure, you can’t improve.”

If we don’t measure those areas of our life that are important, it’s hard to improve them. You must know where you are now before you can move beyond it.

That’s why I thought you might be interested in accessing this great tool from New York Times bestselling author Michael Hyatt…

The LifeScore Assessment™

http://bestyearever.me/a18431/2018assessment

This online self-assessment is easy, quick, and effective in helping you measure where you are in each domain of your life. It shows you where you’re excelling and where you should focus your improvement efforts.

But you can only get the assessment for a limited time. It’s FREE, so check it out today!

http://bestyearever.me/a18431/2018assessment

All you do is quickly rate yourself in each of life’s major domains.  You read a series of descriptive statements and pick the one that most closely aligns with where you perceive yourself to be. You then refine a bit based on your unique situation. It all adds up to your LifeScore™.

It’s simple. But I promise it will instantly show you your opportunities to grow this year.

The assessment is 100% free, but it’s only available for a few days.

http://bestyearever.me/a18431/2018assessment

If you want to improve something, start measuring it. The LifeScore Assessment™ finally gives us an easy way to do this for every area of  our lives. Here’s where to find out your number! http://bestyearever.me/a18431/2018assessment

After you’ve completed the assessment please post your score below and share with us what you’ve learned about yourself from your score.

Schedule a Free 30 Minute Consultation with Michael

Gig Economy Plays a Crucial Role in Hiring freelance Telecom Field Technician

Ramya Sri Alluri is a Marketing specialist and Staff Author at FieldEngineer.com a freelance marketplace to hire a telecom engineers.

In today’s digital world, things are more difficult than ever when you’re competing. This is especially true with the global connectedness. Luckily, however, you can benefit with the advantage of a freelance marketplace that connects you to a telecom field technician or other talent you’re looking for. Businesses are finding numerous benefits of hiring a freelance telecom field technician from a freelance marketplace, such as:

Cost
A freelance telecom field technician can save you immense costs in your business. After all, once you start bringing people in it can sky rocket to mean that your payroll outpaces other costs in your company. So to keep that in check, consider freelancers as a budget option whenever you need it.

Speed
Speed is of the utmost importance in any business. If you lag behind the competition, you’ll find that your customers are going somewhere else. This can spell disaster if you don’t do something to correct it. Benefits of hiring freelance telecom specialists also include speed: you can talk with them instantly from anywhere else in the world and cut down on time costs that would otherwise make you miss important deadlines.

Convenience
It’s incredibly convenient to be able to use your phone or computer to talk with your workers. Whether you are in the office, at home, or in line for lunch, it takes a few punches on a keyboard or taps on your phone to get things running along smoothly. This kind of convenient workflow is quite priceless.

Integration
You can integrate the skills of your telecom hire with the others on your team. Some teams need various skill sets in order to achieve a complex set of directives from the top. If you feel this describes your company, then you’ll derive many benefits from using the marketplaces that connect your team together, no matter if they’re in Asia, Africa, or anywhere in between.

Capability
The worst feeling is when a client wants you to perform something for them but you can’t meet the capability. Having to say no is the worst fate of a business. If you do it too often, you’ll lose your reputation. A benefit of freelance telecom workers is they make you agile and scalable. You can add a few more man hours into the mix to bring a project in on time and under budget.

Security
Security is of the utmost importance for any business. If data gets into the wrong hands, such as customer lists or your secret recipes of how you deliver solutions to customers, then it could spell the end for your business. Enjoy the benefits of freelance when you have them siphoned off from certain knowledge just in case of a data leak. A telecom field technician only needs to know certain variables of what they’re working on.

Hiring new workers for your company can be a pain. However, it doesn’t have to be if you follow the right advice and emulate other companies that have had success in the industry before you. So you can have the most profit with least risk by hiring on freelancers to fill in the gaps needed to make your business a wild success.

Fieldengineer.com is an innovative digital marketplace that connects you with talent all across the globe. You can log into the portal from any computer, phone, or tablet. This makes it fast and convenient to use. In addition it’s free for businesses. Features include live tracking of your engineers and freelancers, management of work orders, fast matching with talent with our AI, and special APIs so you can run your business more effectively and streamlined.

Would you like to submit a Guest Post?

IoT’s surprising impact on revolutionizing inventory management

Sarah Hatfield directs OnProcess Technology’s strategy for products and core service offerings, including the OPTvision platform. She brings more than 15 years of leadership expertise from previous roles in supply chain, product and program management for Comcast, Asurion and ADT.

You know disruptive technologies have reached the tipping point when non-IT pros build business plans around them. This is exactly what’s happening with IoT. Because of its ability to drive wide-ranging, game-changing improvements, IoT is starting to be used across all aspects of business operations. One of the newest, and most impactful, areas is spare parts inventory management, a key aspect of the post-sale supply chain.

Maintaining the right level of spare parts is critical. As you can probably guess, carrying excessive inventory can be prohibitively expensive. But if you have too little, you’ll slow product repairs, hurt customer experience and end up spending more money purchasing new parts for stock replenishment. The problem is, traditional best practices for managing spare parts — using time-series algorithms combined with sales forecasting, seasonality, gut instincts and simple rules of thumb to determine how many parts to stock — are woefully inaccurate because:

  • They’re static, “review-and-stock” endeavors based largely on historical demand data
  • The algorithms don’t account for variables resulting from failed parts in the field

Knowing this, many companies hedge their bets by purposefully overstocking. Others think they’re maintaining the right levels, but unknowingly overstock. In either case, they’re wasting a lot of money.

New IoT-driven inventory planning

The key to accurately stocking parts is knowing which ones are likely to fail and when they’ll need to be replaced. Some businesses have attempted to use IoT data to understand product failure impacts on inventory planning. However, most of the IoT monitoring programs are designed to respond to signal failures. Plus, IoT data collection is often haphazard and emphasizes the few pieces of equipment that are starting to fail, rather than the whole. This makes it impossible to generate a sound baseline for analyzing product performance and predicting failures — which, in turn, makes it impossible to accurately forecast spare parts needs.

The good news is there’s a new inventory planning algorithm that builds IoT-based failure data directly into the equation. Developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Transportation and Logistics, it enables businesses to accurately forecast needs. By using this methodology and analyzing historical failure data on the entire installed base, businesses can predict the exact spare parts they’re likely to need, when and in what quantity.

The better news is that it doesn’t take a huge team to capture IoT data because not much data is needed…. Read More

Are Freelancers the Future of Field Service Staffing?

This interview by Derek Korte, editor at Field Service Digital and a senior editor at Original9 Media. It first appeared at  http://fsd.servicemax.com

Field service leaders have a lot to manage on any given day. But there’s one responsibility that’s often lost while  keeping the work orders flowing and vetting the latest technologies — talent. Sure, the IoT continues to reshape the service industry, but field service is still a people business. When something breaks, customers expect a skilled professional to show up and fix the problem quickly — hopefully the first time.

But it’s a challenge to maintain a trained, knowledgable service team. Experienced techs retire and are difficult to replace, and new technologies require new skill sets. As a result, service organizations are turning to freelancers to supplement their full-time workforce, while ensuring customers get a consistent level of service. We asked Michael Blumberg, president of Blumberg Advisory Group, to explain the most surprising takeaways from his latest research into the freelance phenomenon in field service.

You found that service organizations rely on freelance platforms to improve geographic coverage? Why did that surprise you?

I was surprised to learn that organizations are using freelance management platforms (FMS) for more than just handling a temporary surge in demand, or providing coverage in remote geographic areas. A significant percentage (61 percent) use freelancer platforms to expand their geographic coverage. They are using these platforms to facilitate strategic growth, not just to cut costs or solve a tactical problem.

You also found that organizations increasingly use freelancers to respond to emergency service requests — why?

The conventional wisdom is that freelancers are best suited to handle project work, such as installations and scheduled maintenance. Our research suggests otherwise. In fact, 53 percent of the respondents indicate they utilize freelancers to handle all types of work, including projects and emergency repairs. By relying on freelancers, service managers can ensure they have the right coverage when and where they need it.

What’s unique about a FMS is the crowdsourcing element, which leads to situations where technicians are often competing for the same service request. As a result, technicians know they have to be very responsive because their income depends on it. I’m not suggesting that company-employed technicians are lazy, but sometimes there’s no incentive to take on more calls. There’s no incentive for them to respond faster or get more calls done.

How are service managers using freelance platforms to improve recruitment and onboarding?

Even when organizations use freelance techs, whether for a long-term project or on-demand emergency work, they still have to spend time recruiting, training and onboarding those technicians. The crowdsourcing element of FMS platforms means that managers can find these techs quickly, so they can spend less time recruiting. And the digital nature of these platforms means that managers can train them, share work orders and outline what’s expected. A majority (59 percent) of companies using freelance platforms are able to recruit and hire new technicians in 14 days or fewer, while only 11 percent of non-FMS users are able to achieve this goal.

How do service managers integrate these freelancers into their regular workflows and explain service expectations?

They can be very selective about which freelancers they choose to work with, and they can request technicians who have certain qualifications and skills. Managers can also describe the procedures that the techs must follow when they go out on a call, which is something companies are already doing with full-time technicians. Lastly, some managers administer short quizzes and exams that the freelancers must pass before they’re assigned work.

Your research suggests that agility is the most important factor when deciding to use a FMS. Why?

Nearly two-thirds (64 percent) of respondents indicated that their need for agility is the number one reason why their companies turned to a variable workforce. While cost savings might be the reason why these companies considered this alternative in the first place, agility is why they continue to use it. In today’s dynamic service environment, service organizations need to respond quickly to surges in demand and constantly changing technical skill set requirements. They can’t afford to spend a lot of time staffing up to meet demand because it is likely to change quickly.

And relying on freelance platforms can also improve service productivity and quality? How?

Freelancers are often more engaged with the service organizations that hire them because they see themselves as independent contractors. They’re running their own business.

Freelancers want to demonstrate that they’re responsive and effective so they will be given more jobs. There’s also a snowball effect — the more calls freelancers take, the more income they’ll have, which creates a productivity mindset.

Are there any quality and productivity tradeoffs?

Our survey results indicate that 65 percent of companies using a FMS model have experienced improvement in field service productivity. Furthermore, first-time fix rate is 18 percent higher among top-performing FSM users than the industry average, while SLA compliance is 16 percent higher.

Schedule a free 30 minute consultation now

5 Barriers to Digital Transformation

Howard Tiersky is the President and Founder of FROM, The Digital Transformation Agency. He has a deep passion for digital innovation and helping each of client find success. This blog first appeared on his website.

You may be struggling to drive some sort of change, innovation, or digital transformation within your organization right now.

Why is it so hard? And what’s the secret to getting big companies to successfully transform?

There are five main barriers that large enterprises face when trying to innovate: change resistance, knowledge of customers, risk management, organizational agility and transformation vision.

Change resistance
Change is uncomfortable. Even if a change sets us up for a great future, most people won’t warm up to it quickly. To successfully drive change within an organization, create a burning platform for change so that failing to change is more painful than the change itself. Offer a compelling vision of the future once the change is complete, give people the confidence of success, and provide the opportunity to help create the change (instead of falling victim to it).

Knowledge of customers
You may think you have the answers, but how well do you actually know your customers? To incorporate your customers’ voice into your product development, you can use these five tactics:

  • Humility: Truthfully, we don’t even know ourselves that well, so it’s important to recognize that understanding someone else well enough to predict future behavior is no small feat.
  • Specificity: Figure out exactly what you need to know about your current or potential users that would make a difference to your product development. Use questions like: “What do you they like or not like about your product?” and “What are their unmet needs?”
  • Involvement: Get your whole team involved in customer research to allow the entire development process to include an understanding of the customers’ world and their current reality.
  • Iteration: One round of user testing is not enough — You need to continually study your customers to see how they’re reacting to your product and how their needs are changing.
  • 4D listening: Try to see past the surface of what your customers are saying to what they’re truly asking of you. Your customers may not be able to envision the more practical solutions that your product team conceives.

Risk management
Is it risky to transform your enterprise? Of course! The key to success is creating the expectation that innovation efforts are an iterative process. Successful innovation requires experiments, learning, persistence and, most importantly, the willingness to fail. Once you have alignment around the idea that some level of risk is necessary and appropriate, you can gain confidence from enterprise funders by envisioning the different types of risks your efforts might face and developing remediation strategies to combat those risks.

Organizational agility
As quickly as you can adapt, the digital world changes. Organizational agility is key to keeping up in the digital arena. There are five specific types of agility that are important for success in digital:

  • Sensing: This means knowing what’s going on around you so you can be aware of what actions might be required. How are customers, competitors and industry regulations changing, and what new technology exists that could impact your digital experiences?
  • Technology: Moving quickly from idea to live solution is important in supporting and growing your digital experience. Does your enterprise have technology stacks that are adaptable and easily maintained? Are your content and presentation capabilities accessible to your product owners and content managers?
  • Decision-making: Capital approval processes that take months to reach a final decision don’t work with the speed of digital. The people running your innovation projects need the autonomy and authority to make decisions on the ground-level so that they happen with the speed necessary to keep up with the digital world.
  • Strategy shifts: Embrace and expect that your innovation projects will go through a process of trial-and-error on their way to the kind of digital transformation success that you’re seeking.
  • Teaming: Despite a persistent myth, there is no one structure in which all digital work can be done by a single team of people operating under a single executive. The key to teaming agility is creating a culture with alignment across divisional silos, so that mobilization of the right people happens quickly and efficiently.

Transformation vision
Many organizations have a basic vision for growth: Optimize what already exists or expand upon current offerings. But to create a true transformation vision, one that encompasses your entire organization, you need to determine how the world is changing and how that will affect your customers’ needs. Only then can you determine what new products and services you can bring to market and the different channels you’ll need to deliver on them. You may even decide that the imminent changes will shift your focus to an entirely new set of customers! To be successful in the long-run, think in terms of transformation time so that you can get a few steps ahead.

Would you like to submit a Guest Post?

In Praise of Chat & Online Communities

How FireEye Dramatically Improved Customer Support

Over the last few years, there has been a significant move away from how we access help and support for products or services. Traditionally there would be an instruction manual and more recently a website containing the support documentation for an organization. However, in a digital mobile-first world, we are much more likely to turn to a combination of people and technology to obtain instant answers to our questions.

Advances in technology are already responsible for creating new chat and online communities. I recently spoke with John Bauer, Senior Director, Customer Support Technology at FireEye to understand how they are reducing costs and increasing efficiency by implementing a chat solution.

FireEye set out to transform customer service into a profit center by minimizing the time and effort that it takes to resolve a case. Bauer told me how when he first started there was an emphasis on email, phone and web support. Ideally, you want to leverage your web support channel because it provides the most context and is very efficient, but Bauer also advised that its chat and online communities that are the least costly and most effective.

In our conversation, he also highlighted that smaller support teams would find it relatively easy to manage their workload without the need for analytics. But, Bauer warned, as you scale, it will quickly become apparent, just how much time, and money can be saved through by leveraging analytics.

What many fail to realize is that chat allows organizations to exchange information and, direct customers to articles and documentation, and close calls quicker than the phone, web, or email.  Online communities enable customers to help other customers, monitor discussions and input as required. And it requires far less personnel to maintain community interactions than email or phone support.

The value bombs quickly became apparent. Moving away from the phone to online chat provided 30% in cost savings and 30% faster resolutions. After previously investing in around 30 FTEs for knowledge creation purposes to deliver email and phone support at another organization, Bauer only needed 2-3 FTEs to create valuable content for their online communities.

Research by the team at FireEye enabled them to learn that when a customer needed help, approximately 50% of the time they would go to a knowledgebase article, 40% go to the community, and only 10% would ever head towards documentation.

A few years ago, many companies approached the invasion of social media with an element of fear. Equally, FireEye faced the same resistance internally when looking to embrace community features. On the one hand, it’s glaringly obvious that people want to communicate directly with a human to obtain an immediate answer to their questions, but on the other, employees are fearful about negative connotations that could arise from conflict and disputes voiced over social media

Some might argue that the risk of a disgruntled customer broadcasting negative stuff about you or your company would never end on a positive note. Replying to them rather than burying your heads in the sand seems much more progressive.  You should never underestimate the power of your community either. There is something quite beautiful about the moment when your own customers jump in to tackle challenging behavior in their community. Bauer, even stated, “With communities, you will find customers whose seemingly full-time job became being a champion.”

Once again, it was analytics that illustrated the strength of the case to deliver tangible results. 30% faster time to resolve cases, 30% less effort required. Yet, discovering that 90% of visitors to their community only consumed information from their communities also proved to be incredibly valuable to FireEye.

Although a community of any kind needs people to manage and nurture it, the most interesting aspect of their discovery was that is also delivered a much higher ROI. The FireEye community was measured against call avoidance, currently at 25% of support demand; the ultimate goal at FireEye was for customers to find their own answers, through a Self-Service model, and move away from the time-consuming process of logging a case through email or telephone.

However, Bauer also warned that implementing chat can only be successful if your community responds quickly. Failure to engage with a customer within one minute will cause your abandon rate to skyrocket and stop chat adoption in its tracks. For these reasons alone, Bauer needed a platform that he could entrust with FireEye’s reputation.

Bauer told me, “You need to be committed. Starting a community is like having a child. For most enterprises, it will take 12-24 months of commitment to building community before it starts to operate organically.” We often over complicate tech solutions by investing countless hours trying to introduce sophisticated functionality. However, the secret to the successful implementation and adoption of chat technology at FireEye seems to be the use of both chat and communities to solve a problem for the customer. Maybe this is a lesson we can all learn from.

Please share your thoughts and insights by commenting below.

Setting Your Knowledge Free

Lessons from the Front Lines of Knowledge Management for Field Service

Thank you to Bo Wandell, VP Sales and Business Development at Infomill, Inc for this week’s guest post.

One of fastest and most cost-effective ways to improve field service KPIs is to Set Your Knowledge Free by delivering it to your service technicians’ laptops and mobile devices. Knowledge is power in field service operations – but only when your technicians have mobile access to it. Aberdeen Group found that service organizations incur an average of $1.68M each in unnecessary costs due to poor access to knowledge.[1]

Tacit vs. Explicit Corporate Knowledge

The two kinds of corporate knowledge are tacit and explicit. Tacit knowledge resides in the minds of employees, while explicit knowledge already exists in some published form, though it is probably locked up your corporate silos.

While both are highly valued by field service technicians, many organizations focus more on creating tacit knowledge, which can be an arduous and time-consuming task. In a 2015 survey[2] TSIA found that on average it takes 12 days to publish just one new article in a knowledge base. Some companies reported it’s not uncommon for the approval process to take 90 to 120 days.

A more cost effective and less risky approach for organizations to quickly improving KPIs is to focus on the delivery of explicit (existing) knowledge which has already been created and validated by internal departments.

Most corporations have large amounts of valuable explicit knowledge in the form of paper-based documents, PDFs, product and installation manuals, part lists, images, exploded diagrams, databases and more. Setting Your Knowledge Free means re-purposing this knowledge to create a current, searchable and accessible knowledge base for your field service technicians.

Explicit knowledge must be current if it’s going to be useful

So, why is Setting Your Knowledge Free so damn hard?

First and foremost, when your technical writers published the knowledge, they probably didn’t consider how a field service tech would need to access it.

Simply posting a 200-page installation manual PDF on a website is better than a sharp stick in the eye, but just barely. When a technician that shows up at hospital to service a lifesaving medical device, scrolling through a 200-page service manual on his device to find an answer to one question isn’t reasonable. What they need is a mobile application that provides an intuitive and searchable repository of all available explicit knowledge. According to Aberdeen Group, field service technicians spend an average of 14% of their time researching the information they need to do their jobs.[1]

However, it’s critical that explicit knowledge is kept current and continuously optimized. Corporate staff can try to anticipate the knowledge that service organizations will value, the technicians know best what they require to increase first-time fix rates and customer satisfaction while shortening field visits and increasing service-related profits.

There are many misleading or incorrect sources for content out there. For consistency, it is important that the knowledge your company created remains relevant and reliable.

Four lessons from the knowledge management trenches

Setting Your Knowledge Free requires a blend of people, process and technology led by a competent staff member called the Knowledge Czar. Below are four high level steps infused with a lot of lessons from the knowledge management trenches.

1.     Discovery – breaking into departmental silos

Establish team to the define the KPIs you’ll use to measure success. At the same time, identify and gather the sources of explicit knowledge available inside your corporate departments regardless of format. Otherwise you run the risk of your knowledge management project being delayed and the Knowledge Czar becoming frustrated.

2.     Convert – Mobilizing explicit knowledge

Convert explicit knowledge into XML or another industry standard format suitable for delivery to multiple types of mobile devices. This process is challenging, but assistance exists either from software applications or companies that specialize in converting documents to XML.

Next, add intelligence such as hyperlinks, hot spots, images, and links to external databases and videos. Intelligence should anticipate the knowledge needs of a field service tech. For example, if a tech is replacing part #001, he might need to test part #002. Provide a hot link for the instructions to test part #002.

3.     Review and Measure

The Knowledge Czar is responsible for performing a quality audit to ensure consistency and accuracy by manually verifying each piece of content and cleansing the outdated knowledge artifacts.

Measuring the success of the knowledge base can be accomplished by conducting surveys of service technicians. Since techs are on the front lines and deal with customers every day, they will provide valuable input on how to improve the knowledge base.

4.     Continuous Optimization – Keeping knowledge current

As discussed above, keeping content current is where most field service organizations struggle. Ensure that the Knowledge Czar has the responsibility and time to continuously optimize the knowledge base.

A final word of caution: creating and delivering a knowledge base that improves KPIs will result in your Knowledge Czar being hailed as a corporate hero. If they are rewarded with a promotion, make sure they’re replaced with someone equally as enthusiastic and committed to delivering knowledge to your technicians.

Would you like to submit a Guest Post?

[1] http://www.aberdeen.com/research/12031/12031-rr-knowledge-management-service/content.aspx
[2] https://www.tsia.com/documents/The_State_of_Social_Support_2015/

How Freelance Engineers are Adding Value to Businesses

Sachin Reddy is a staff author at Fieldengineer.com which is an On-Demand Marketplace for Telecom Freelance Engineers.

Telecommunication internet service providers invest billions of dollars into advancing the field and maintaining their vast networks. They are known for their innovation, but that innovation has been stymied by the lack of in-house engineers with the right skillset to efficiently offer solutions to problems and questions. Instead, companies are spending vast amounts of time looking for the right in-house employee when a significant number of top-tier engineers can be found offering the services as telecom field engineers. Looking for engineers outside of their company can save companies money and time as well as putting them into contact with next generation of field engineers.

Save Money
Most companies don’t want to pay the price to have top tier engineers on staff at all times and those engineers don’t want to accept less than they’re worth. Only hiring talented engineers with a specialized knowledge when they are needed saves the company money while it allows the engineer to set their price. This is especially true when multiple engineers are needed for a project. Companies don’t want to invest in that, but they need to realize that an in-house team doesn’t meet the requirements sometimes. When that happens, there’s a market of smart and talented workers who can provide companies with the knowledge and skills they need to capitalize on new opportunities. The one-time payment for an outsourced engineer would be the fraction of the cost of hiring a full-time engineer with the same talents.

Save Time

Sites like fieldengineer.com offer companies their pick of a large quantity of candidates who are qualified. That cuts out the time needed to put up job postings, wait for replies from potential employees, schedule an interview, and finally schedule a start date. Online, their professional experience and education gets listed for companies to peruse. Companies don’t have to rely on their own self-promotion either. Like all areas online, sites like these thrive on reviews. Companies review the people who have worked for them based on their skill, experience, and attitude. An engineer’s reputation for hard work and smart solutions is supported by positive reviews from other telecom companies who know what’s needed in that field. Of course, in order to assure you’re saving time and getting professionals in the field, it’s better to look at marketplaces specializing in connecting companies to engineers and only engineers.

Find New Talent

Newer talent can be found freelancing online. Many talented professionals have moved over to marketplaces because of the freedom and flexibility offered. The millennial generation and others who have welcomed the technological age with open arms have adjusted to the gig economy. Online sites give them a place to display their talent to every possible client. It’s also given them the control to pursue their own interests and bid for jobs that both hold their interest and conform to their schedule. These short-terms contract works best for them and best for the companies involved. So, the companies that find engineers on these sites for network planning analysis are getting self-motivated contractors who confident enough in their own skills to sell them to knowledgeable management teams. These are also eager contractors who applied out of a true desire to be involved for however long the project is meant to last. That’s the kind of energetic disposition and problem-solving nature that exists on marketplaces.

Companies can try to strengthen their in-house teams, but innovative solutions are often going to come from outside. Marketplaces like Field Engineer are dedicated to a promoting the freelance job market for a certain field, and that specialization is what makes them easier to work with and more dependable. They put talented engineers in a place they can be found, and they give companies the opportunity to present their project and project needs.

Would you like to submit a Guest Post?

Why The Customer Experience Should Be At The Heart Of Marketing and Selling Services

Consumers now reside in a digital world where instant gratification is the new currency. The rise of Spotify, Netflix, Amazon Prime Now and Uber ensures they can avoid any pain points and get what they want and when they want it in a new on demand economy.

However, the ‘we want it now’ consumer continues to evolve and now expects a personalized experience too. If online services know what their favorite movies, TV shows and music they like, surely retailers will know what they like too.

Tech savvy users are looking for businesses to lead the way with new technology that continues to treat them as unique individuals. A generic marketing e-mail with their name pasted at the top in a different font is no longer going to cut it.

The evolution of the customer experience has even given birth to the phrase Martech which is the blending of marketing and technology. Industries across multiple industries are all facing the same problem as the digital transformation of everything gathers pace.

Keeping up with all the latest trends across the digital landscape is no longer an option it should be compulsory for anyone serious about the future of their business. The good news is that you are not alone and the fact that 76% of field service providers were reportedly struggling to achieve revenue growth should be the only wake-up call that you need to take this seriously.

However, there are numerous field service winners here too. For example, in 2017 there are many organizations providing seamless digital experiences and delivering faster resolution times. It is often said that technology works best when it brings together and here is a selection of great examples.

The Value of Improving the Customer Journey

Personalization is much more than just another industry buzzword but a reaction to the demand driven by consumers. Providing the right experience at the right time is an art that many are still learning to master. But, the ability to increase 15% percent of revenue and lower the cost of serving customers by 20% is a language that every member of the boardroom will understand.

Do Not Underestimate the Importance of Customer Service

According to Microsoft, an incredible 97% of consumers advised customer service is critical to their choice or loyalty to a brand. But it’s also crucial to remember how this is across self-service, social, phone, mobile and a plethora of devices.

The divide between offline and online is disappearing. No matter what device we have at hand, wherever we are located and if we are using our keyboard, touchscreen or even voice, the experience should be the same.

Poor Customer Service Will Be Punished

It is well understood that it costs businesses more to acquire a new customer than it does to keep an existing one. Savvy consumers will happily shop around for the best deal. Ironically many companies seem to treat their current clients with contempt arrogantly and assume they will stay with them regardless.

The reality here in 2017 is that 64% of consumers have switched providers in at least one industry due to poor customer service according to Accenture. We no longer suffer fools gladly, and a lack of patience or frustration will ensure most consumers will switch providers after only one negative experience.

In this digital age, loyalty must now be earned rather than taken for granted. The only question that remains is what are you doing about it?

Time Is Money

An Amazon Prime account makes one-click ordering and delivery within 2 hours a reality. Maybe, we shouldn’t be too surprised how our time is becoming increasingly valuable. Forrester recently advised that 73% of consumers will happily admit that their time is the most important factor where businesses need to focus.

Pain points such as long-winded automated phone menus, cumbersome online chats or waiting around between 9 am and 6 pm for somebody to call you will no longer be tolerated. Organizations need to manage the expectations of their customers and remove friction to offer a truly simplified service in a timely manner.

Make Way for The Internet of Things (IoT)

With 50 Billion internet-connected devices by 2020, the time to take IoT seriously is right now. Consumers do not care about your product roadmaps; they now expect the same experience with any of their devices.

There is already a long line of competitors offering similar services. Failing to keep up will leave your brand looking like a tired Sears or J. C. Penney store that failed to keep up with the speed of hyper change across the digital landscape.

OVERALL

Advances in machine learning, deep learning, and artificial intelligence have already made real-time personalization a reality. A dramatic rise in expectation levels means that users of all ages now demand the same experiences across multiple platforms.

Mainstream audiences are looking for businesses to lead the way and provide the wow factor through technology based solutions. However, sometimes, they just want greater digital interaction and to be treated as a unique individual from a fellow human being.

Schedule a Free Consultation Today