Why Businesses Need to Adopt Mobile Marketing Plans Today

mobile marketing

This guest blog post was written by Sophorn Chhay. Sophorn is the marketing guy at Trumpia, the most complete SMS software with mass mobile messaging, smart targeting and automation. Follow Sophorn on Twitter(@Trumpia)

Each year, mobile marketing grows stronger. The world currently hosts over 3.65 billion unique smartphone users. Industries are expanding rapidly, facilitating the consumer’s need for deep, dynamic mobile connectivity.

To stand out, companies need to rework communicative and marketing outreaches to play upon mobile’s far-reaching impact. Creating a winning campaign takes time, but actionable plans certainly exist. Check out the following reasons companies are opting for smartphone support, and double-check your brand’s strategy for a watertight platform capable of harnessing the power of mobile.

One: Mobile Interaction Boosts Reaction

In the past, Internet-based content was vital to a modern marketer’s toolkit. Businesses now, however, are relying on mobile contact for interaction. 58 percent of consumers experiencing one-way communication tell their friends and family about it. Dynamic feedback has become the norm, and real-time SMS strategies, strategically media outreach and mobile web support are laying the future’s foundation.

Two: Mobile Coupons are Highly Redeemable

In 2015, SMS-delivered coupons experienced an open rate 10 times higher than printed coupons. Mobile coupons are highly convenient, and their discounts are commonly sought by day-to-day consumers. Because SMS, again, is a two-way street, brands can create custom-tailored offers. Mobile coupons both attract and retain customers, opening the doors to ongoing loyalty rewards.

Three: Mobile Apps are Taking Over

Mobile apps have become preferred engagement platforms in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of American buyers are considered to be “mobile app addicts.” They install, on average, 17 apps per month. The mobile marketing industry’s inclination to boost customer involvement via apps is telling of the mobile world’s overall health. Mobile apps are quickly becoming advertisement breeding grounds, and companies holding an app-centric course are prospering.

Four: SMS is a Preferred Communication Platform

Over 205 billion emails are sent daily. Unfortunately, they’re being ignored for text messages. While email open rates vary by industry, most companies experience an average open rate of 20 to 40 percent. Texts, however, experience an astounding 90 percent open rate. Consumers are reading texts, and they’re engaging brands at deep, intuitive levels. After 2016, brands unable to enchant buyers by way of text will be more than a few steps behind. Sure, email is still a viable marketing tool, but it fails to compete against SMS’s inherent communicative power.

Five: MMS is Even Better than SMS

MMS messages strike more conversations than SMS messages do. Many mobile marketers are redefining their strategies upon media-centric engagement strategies. Viral videos offered through Facebook and YouTube might be effective—but few platforms can compete with texting.

MMS content is highly shareable. It’s preferred by mobile marketing’s biggest fan-base, too. Millennials are viewing, sharing, voting on and even creating mobile video content. While Snapchat sparked much of the MMS craze, it’s currently unable to content with several of the business world’s creative initiatives. Branded SMS messages have a limit of 160 characters, while MMS messages can jam-pack thousands of words within a single video. Check out this article, and find out how your MMS strategy compares to baseline SMS approaches.

It’s important to understand the mobile world’s trajectory. The Internet of Things, alongside much of the business world’s contingency on immediacy, has made smartphone-centric marketing incomparable. Your brand, your workers, your strategy and your consumer base need mobile connectivity. The smartphone has created a paradigm shift, and it’s hitting the professional world hard. Double-check your strategy, find a gap for mobile and expand a smartphone-centric plan from within.

What’s Next?

What do you think of what I’ve covered so far? Will you adopt mobile as your tool for marketing?  I would love to read your comments below.

Jumpstart your business by grabbing your free copy of Sophorn’s powerful Mobile Marketing Success Kit.

Big Data & Analytics – A Transformational Journey

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Last month I had the good fortune to attend the Reverse Logistics Sustainability Council (RLSC) and Warranty Chain Management (WCM) conferences.   Big Data & Analytics was a topic that gained much prominence at both of these conferences.  Indeed, this is a subject that is gaining much attention in business and academic circles these days.  Interestingly, there is a general consensus among academics and industry thought leaders that Big Data Analytics is one of the most misunderstood and misused terms in the business world.  For some business professionals, the term analytics applies specifically to performance metrics, for others it has to do with unstructured data sets and data lakes, while still others think it relates to predicting the future.

Big Data refers to the volume, velocity, and variety of data that a company has at their disposal. Analytics applies to the discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful patterns in data.  The truth is that there are actually four (4) different types of Big Data Analytics that firms can rely on to make business decisions.

  • Descriptive Analytics: This type of Analytics answers the question “What is happening?”  In a field service organization (FSO) this may be as simple as KPIs like SLA compliance or First Time Fix rate.  The exact measurement tells an FSO how well it is doing when it comes to fixing problems right the first time and meeting customer obligations for response time.
  • Diagnostic Analytics: Understanding what is happening is important, but it is even more important to understand why something is happening.  This is how managers and executives can identify and resolve problems before they get out of hand. Diagnostic Analytics provides this level of insight, for example by pin-pointing why First Time Fix Rate is low.  Maybe it’s because the company is making poor decisions about which Field Engineers (FEs) are dispatched to the customers’ sites.  Or, perhaps selected Field Engineers do not have access to the right parts when they arrive on site and must return for a second visit.
  • Predictive Analytics: Ok, so now we know why something is happening. Wouldn’t it also be good to know what is likely to happen next?  Predictive Analytics provides this level of insight. In other words, it provides a forecast about what may happen if a company continues to experience a low first time fix rate.  For example, it could show the specific impact on customer satisfaction or the measurable effect on service costs and/or gross margins.   In this case, Predictive Analytics helps a company understand with a high level of statistical confidence how long it may continue to maintain the status quo before financial problems may arise.
  • Prescriptive Analytics: The final component of analytics is Prescriptive A This level of information helps a company understand at a granular level of certainty exactly what it should do to resolve a current situation and avoid future problems.  For example, Prescriptive Analytics may reveal that a company must ensure the field engineer has the right parts on hand prior to being dispatched to arriving at the customer site.  The Analytics can show which parts must be available and where they should be located.

In summary, Analytics takes the guesswork out of decision-making.  Instead of relying on intuition or prior experience, service executives can make sound business decisions based on objective analysis of data.  As a result, the probability of making the right decision increases.   Relying on Analytics to drive business decisions involves a transformational journey.  As innovative as it seems, a company cannot just start using Predictive or Prescriptive Analytics. It must first become proficient with Descriptive Analytics before it can leverage the power of more advanced analytic models.    This journey is not just about the data.  Many managers mistakenly believe that they must have enough of the right data to make Analytics work.  The truth is that we all have a wealth of data at our disposal.  Our challenge is finding the tools and technology to process the data, making Analytics a winning business proposition.  This begs the question: does your service organization have an optimal system in place to harness the power of Analytics?  If you are not certain, it may be time to conduct an audit and assessment of your infrastructure.  To learn more, schedule a free consultation today.