How to Prevent Ongoing Performance Issues

Our Guest Blogger this week is Jan van Veen. He helps technology and manufacturing companies increase momentum for a continuous and quicker adaption to change. Adaptability is a key success factor for sustainable success in an increasingly complex world with rapid changes.  Download his research report “Adapt or Die – How to increase momentum for sustainable success”

Is your company experiencing continuous performance issues? Are your co-workers fixing these problems, adequately and rapidly? Many manufacturing companies often suffer with ongoing performance issues.  Their most common intervention is to do more of the same, in the hope that this will do the trick. In a complex world that is rapidly evolving, it is essential to continuously adapt and drive performance. But is this easier said than done?

Take a regional leadership team for example, that once struggled with reaching their expected growth. As the pressure for them increased, their main intervention was to create a list of potential sales opportunities within their respective countries; in order to meet their objectives, they would only have needed to gain a small portion of these leads. Unsurprisingly however, this  didn’t work out.

Why get Stuck?

As opposed to just a ‘quick-fix’, many performance issues require a more thought-out intervention. This should begin with a thorough root cause analysis, involving different stakeholders bringing in their individual perspectives. Several teams or departments will often need to collaborate, to implement the adequate solution.

In practice, this appears to be difficult for individuals and teams whilst they are in the so-called ‘defensive survival mode’ or in the fixed mindset (as opposed to Carol Dweck’s famous ‘Growth Mindset’). The common “planning & control” management approach is what pushes co-workers into this defensive survival mode. They focus on short-term targets and punish set-backs. They fail to give themselves time to sit back, discover the root cause, and seek alternatives.

Consequently, people in the defensive survival mode will focus on their survival by reducing risk, justifying issues, identifying external circumstances, blaming others for causing problems, and so on. This impacts performance and creates performance issues throughout the company.

The Alternative

Let’s go back to the leadership team from our last example. How different would it have been if they had taken the time to find out why their business was failing to grow? What if they had involved other stakeholders and experts, or interviewed a couple of (potential) clients? The team could have discovered that their company did not have the right brand or proposition for this specific region. They could have solved the performance issue from first principle, at the root cause. This would have resulted in quicker, and more sustainable solutions.

The Solution for ongoing performance issues

To resolve the matter, employees at every level should be confident and eager to adapt, collaborate, try, rethink, question, and most importantly: act! With modern “sense & respond” management practices you can increase the momentum to continuously adapt and drive change. There are a few practical things you could do, to increase momentum in your team:

  • Let them take the time to analyze the root causes.
  • Schedule meetings with team members to discuss these root causes.
  • Engage in strategic dialogue across all levels, to discuss and adjust priorities.
  • When objectives are not met, initiate a forward-looking approach; with a constructive review and discussion, that will lunge your team forward.
  • Introduce shared objectives as a basis for the review, as well as rewards for your team members; this will get them all in the ‘same boat’, and drive collaboration.

Hold them individually accountable, by agreeing on separate objectives that can all contribute towards the overall goal.

Would you like to submit a Guest Post?

The New Field Service Workforce

Images Outreach article

There has been a dramatic shift over the past 5 to 10 years in the way work is performed in the U.S. and Europe as more and more workers join the gig economy.  By definition, a gig economy is an environment where temporary positions are common and organizations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements.  In other words, people are increasingly taking on freelance work.

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 53 million Americans are currently working as freelancers.  By 2020, 50% of the American workforce will be engaged in freelance activity. Furthermore, a study published by the Freelancers Union and Elance O-Desk indicates that freelance work contributes $750 billion annually to the US economy.

The gig economy has played a significant role within the Field Service Industry.  It is driven by the trend of many companies to implement variable workforce (VWF) models. This is a business model in which a field service organization (FSO) relies on a contingent workforce to manage peaks and valleys in labor demand.  Earlier this year, Blumberg Advisory conducted an extensive research study to examine the impact of VWF models on the Field Service Industry. The study, sponsored by Field Nation, revealed  that 8 out of 10 FSOs have implemented VWF models to manage over one-half (53%) of their workforces.

One of the ways that FSOs implement the VWF model is through a Freelancer Management System (FMS).  This is an integrated software platform that includes functionality for Vendor Management System (VMS), Human Capital Management System (HCMS), Service Ticketing System, on-line recruitment tools, and reporting & analytics. Approximately two-thirds of survey respondents use this type of solution to manage their contingent labor pool of field technicians.

The single biggest benefit of using an FMS, as reported by 70% of survey respondents, is scalability.  In other words, the ability to scale the workforce up or down based on service demands.   A majority of respondents also perceive access to a vibrant marketplace of freelance technicians (61%), the flexibility that an FMS has in managing W2 and 1099 employees (56%), and lower cost of overhead (54%) that results from using an FMS, among the top benefits.  Just under half of the respondents (46%) viewed lower direct labor cost as a benefit of using an FMS platform.

In addition to these benefits, FMS platforms have a measurable impact on field service financial and operating performance.  Indeed, companies that use FMS platforms report having observed a 6% or more improvement in field service key performance indicators (KPIs) such as field service productivity (i.e., # of visits per day), labor utilization rates, SLA compliance, recurring revenue, and gross margins.

Obviously, the gig economy has had a positive impact on FSOs who rely on the VWF model and FMS platforms.  However, many opponents of the gig economy believe that freelancing models take advantage of workers and therefore are bad for individuals.  The facts point to the contrary. In 2015, Field Nation, a leading FMS platform provider to the field service industry, conducted a survey among freelance workers to understand their attitudes and perceptions of freelance work.  An overwhelming majority indicated that the freelance lifestyle is both a personnel choice (88%) and their primary source of income (73%).  Almost all the respondents were satisfied with the work they do (97%) and the career choice they had made (95%).

These findings suggest that the nature of work within the Field Service Industry has changed for good. The days of individual commitment to a single employer and vice versa are long gone.  Freelancing is not a passing fad within Field Service .  Furthermore, Freelancer Management System (FMS) platforms make it possible for FSOs to achieve positive, measurable results from implementing a Variable Workforce Model. Clearly, the gig economy is here to stay.

Have a question? Click to schedule a consultation.

To obtain a copy of our new ground breaking report on benchmarks and best practices in field service staffing click here.