What Smarketing Looks Like

(And Why Your Company Needs to Adopt It)

This article is reposted with permission from Tenfold Blog (www.tenfold.com).

Smarketing is a new buzz word in the world of sales and marketing. Actually, it’s a contraction of sales & marketing. Hubspot defines smarketing as: “…the alignment between your sales and marketing teams created through frequent and direct communication between the two.”

Since a company’s end goal is always the same, it makes perfect sense to integrate sales and marketing processes in the pursuit of those end goals. Establishing this common ground makes the process of acquiring leads and converting them a lot smoother. It also makes more sense for a consumer to undergo a more cohesive experience. A disjointed experience between sales and marketing can lead to consumer confusion and lost opportunities. A consumer should never feel like they’re being tossed around.

Instead of treating sales and marketing teams like two competing units, a company that takes a cooperative approach makes them all part of the same team. Bringing them together as allies will positively impact a company’s bottom line as well. In fact, some companies that have joined their sales and marketing forces reported a 20% revenue growth.

So, what does smarketing look like within a company?

It starts with a framework

First, a company’s sales and marketing teams need to be on the same page regarding their target market and what they consider a warm lead. They should also know what their respective objectives are. How many leads should marketing be bringing in? How fast should sales follow up with a lead? How many times should they follow up? Making sure everyone is aligned makes the process so much more straightforward. It’s like a team playing together on a  soccer field; the infield and the outfield both know when and where to send the ball. A clear sales and marketing strategy is vital.

Using common terminology

In addition to functioning within the same framework, a company’s sales and marketing alignment depends on using common terminology for the entire funnel process. Having set terms and terminology will not only make the discourse between departments clearer, it will also make the process more streamlined for the customer. If sales is using one set of terminology and marketing is using another, they risk sending mixed messages to the consumer.

Frequent sales and marketing meetings

Saying that a company’s sales and marketing teams work together sounds nice in theory, but it must also be put into practice. Regular meetings provide the physical coming together of the sales and marketing teams and focusing on a common purpose. Sales and marketing management should also work closely together to ensure objectives are being met or to establish those objectives.

The purpose of the meetings is to track their collective progress and hone the smarketing process. Bringing ideas, resources, and suggestions together in meetings can bolster the entire process. Bringing the teams together face-to-face as allies reduces any antagonism, replacing it with the constructive opportunity to build on each other’s success instead.

Create boundaries

Even though the purpose of smarketing is to bring the sales and marketing teams together, there must still be delineation between their respective responsibilities. Clear boundaries must be set between where marketing ends and sales begins so intrusion can be avoided. After all, sales and marketing are two different specialties that require different skills. Employees must know what their particular roles are in a company and how they fit together to keep friction to a minimum.

Closed loop reporting

Anyone from sales or marketing should be able to tell where a particular lead is in the sales and marketing process. They should never be left wondering: “Hey whatever happened to that guy I met at that seminar in June?” They should be able to open up a program and see exactly where that guy is in the buying process. Business 2 Community recommends using both marketing automation software and CRM software to provide data access for both teams and build transparency.

Closed-loop reporting also offers more opportunities for two-way discussion and input between sales and marketing teams. They can check in with each other to enhance the process or give each other valuable customer insight. Aligning sales and marketing processes makes both sides feel they’re working towards a collective goal.

The moral?

Creating a sales-marketing alignment plan can boost a company’s bottom line by creating an opportunity to build each other up rather than tear each other down. Environments, where the sales and marketing teams are competitive rivals, don’t make much sense when the main objective is the same.

To create sales and marketing alignment, a company needs to improve the relationship and conversation between the departments. Smarketing puts sales and marketing on the same team for the benefit of the company as a whole. Now that’s smart marketing!

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Sales and The Field Service Engineer

Questions from Kris Oldland, Publisher of Field Service News

The following is a compilation of a 4 part series from Field Service News called ‘The Big Discussion’ All four questions with the answers from Michael Blumberg appear here to give you a clear picture on his views of the role of Field Service Engineers in sales to existing customers.

“In the Big Discussion we will take one topic, bring together three leading experts on that topic and put four key questions to them to help us better understand its potential impact on the field service sector…”

It is often said service technicians are the greatest salesmen – what are your views on this?

Service technicians bring a perspective and outlook that makes them great at sales in certain situations. For example, where the sale solves a critical problem for the customer.

Basically, customers appreciate the fact that service technicians are problem solvers and place the customer’s need first. As a result, the service technician has trust and credibility with the customer.

In turn, the customer is highly likely to act on the service technician’s recommendations. Sometimes, the only way a technician can solve the customer’s problem is by having them buy something new like a spare part, new piece of equipment, or value-added service offering.

In these situations, the sale is not viewed as a sale at all by the customer but merely as an attempt by the technician to solve the customer’s problem

Is there a difference between selling service and selling products?

Yes, there is an enormous difference.

Selling products requires the salesperson to focus on the form, fit, and function of the product and how it meets the customer’s needs. Selling products is about selling the tangible.

Selling services requires the salesperson to focus on how the service can help the customer solve a problem, improve their situation, or achieve a better outcome.

More importantly, it is about selling the intangible.

Is incentivising service technicians to “sell” opening up new revenue streams or putting their “trusted advisor” status at risk?

Technicians represent a ready and available channel for generating incremental service revenues.

After all, they are at the customer site almost every day.

However, service technicians may become over-zealous or pushy about selling, and jeopardize their “trusted advice” status, if they lack proper sales training or if their performance measurement system and company culture are too focused on sales.

What impact does the rising uptake in outcome based services have on the relationship between service and sales?

Selling outcome based services requires greater collaboration and communication between service and sales than ever before. Service needs to understand and support the solution that the sales force crafts for the customer.

The sales force needs to have a clear understanding of the capabilities of the service team to craft the right solution.

Basically, service and sales must work as a team. In addition, the service organization must be proficient at sales so they can add-on additional services to better meet outcomes as these opportunities present themselves.

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Should Technicians Sell to Your Customers?

I attended a very interesting session at WBR’s Field Service USA 2017 Conference a few weeks ago.  It was billed as an “Oxford Style Debate: Should Technicians Sell to Your Customers?”  The debate about whether technicians should sell has been around for decades.  I know that has been a hot topic of discussion since I’ve been in the industry and I started working as a consultant in 1985.   While the topic has been discussed in countless articles and conference presentations, this was the first time I’ve heard it presented as an open debate.  I found it refreshing because it gave conference participants the opportunity to ask questions and challenge conventional wisdom which helps in formulating one’s position on a subject.

Arguing for technicians as sales people were Tom Vorin, VP of Customer Services, ISCO International and Ron Zielinski, VP, Global Customer Service Coherent.    Arguing against Technicians as salespeople were Andrew Kovach, VP US Lifecycle Services, ABB and Chris Westlake, VP & GM of Services & Electrical Businesses, RK.  Each side did an excellent job in presenting their case.

The argument that Vorin and Zielinski presented was that companies who have technicians sell create additional value not only for their company but for their customers.  In other words, their customers appreciate the fact that their technicians can identify new products and services that help improve their situation and/or business.  Since they already view their technicians as trusted advisors, customers are more likely to listen to technicians’ suggestions than if a sales person approached them directly about buying more products or services.  Basically, technicians are perceived to be objective when advising customers of their options and thus carry an air of credibility around themselves.

Kovach and Westlake’s argument against technicians as sales people centered around three issues. First, technicians are not comfortable in a sales role. If they like to sell, then they would have pursed a career as a sale person.  Second, putting technicians in a sales role can hurt the brand and jeopardize the level of trust that already exists.  After all, customers are not stupid and will quickly catch-on that they are being sold too.  Third, and most importantly, technicians must stay focused on their job of solving problems and keeping customers happy.   Anything else is a distraction and disruptive to the customer relationship.

Of course, each side had an opportunity for rebuttal and the audience had a chance to express their opinion and vote on which position/argument they favored most. The vote occurred before and after the debate.   Although a larger percentage of the audience were in favor of technicians selling before the debate occurred, Kovach and Westlake changed several people’s opinions about whether technicians should sell.  Ironically, after the debate Kovach and Westlake revealed it was staged, that they were asked by the conference organizers to take the against position, and that they do involve their technicians in the sales process.  Basically, they have them identify opportunities and refer them to the sales force.  In describing the sales role of technicians, Vorin and Zielinksi also implied that their technicians work in a similar capacity.    Both sides agreed that the “debate” was all in fun and it provided a fantastic opportunity to present ideas on the best way to involve technicians in the sales process.

In case you are wondering, I agree that technicians should not be selling to customers.   However, neither side of the debate was really arguing that technicians should sell.  They were basically suggesting that technicians can play a role in the sales process by uncovering customer pain points, identifying solutions, and referring business opportunities to the sales force.    Quite frankly, unless, a technician has a sales quota, can overcome objections, and close the sale they are not actually sales people.  I also think that if their compensation is not based in part on some form of sales incentive or commission for closing business then they will never be fully committed to sales.

However, I would not argue for placing technicians in a direct sales role as it could be disruptive or damaging to business.  On the other hand, any company that is passionate about growing their top line revenue, increasing customer satisfaction, and improving their market share needs to adopt a “sales” oriented approach where everyone in the company plays a role in the sales process.  That’s why I agree with the proposition that technicians should be play an important role in uncovering customer pain points, identifying solutions, and referring business opportunities to the sales force.   Bear in mind, the systems, performance metrics and processes need to be in place, and the proper training and coaching needs to be provided if they are going to realize success in this role.

I’d love to read your perspective on this subjective. Do you think technicians should sell to customers?  If yes, please share your experience in the comments section of this post.   Let me know what works and doesn’t work.  If you want some advice or suggestions on how to make it work then schedule a free consultation today.

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Treat salespeople like the valuable assets they are

sales people 3

With so much merger and acquisition activity occurring within the High Tech Industry, I thought it would make sense to understand how sellers should deal with their most valuable assets, their salespeople.  I posed this question to my friend and business partner, Joe Vanore at Everingham & Kerr, who gave me permission to republish this article from the company’s June/July 2014 newsletter….

Knowledgeable, experienced salespeople with strong customer relationships are worth their weight in gold — or perhaps the premium paid to acquire their company. So the last thing you want to do as you integrate your acquisition is alienate this valuable group of employees. Instead, focus on convincing sales staff of your merger’s merits and involving them in the planning process.

Thwarting the competition

As soon as your deal is announced, competitors are likely to contact your target’s customers to persuade them to jump ship, claiming that your combined organization will be too big or bureaucratic to effectively serve them. Competitors will also attempt to recruit your best salespeople.

Act quickly to thwart competitors’ efforts and reap the benefits that attracted you to the transaction in the first place. Help salespeople communicate the deal to customers by preparing a script that explains expected changes and how customers will benefit. Include FAQs and provide the name of a person in the organization who can answer questions your sales staff can’t.

Face to face meetings

Also be sensitive to the morale in the sales department. It’s not enough to communicate upcoming events via e-mail. CEOs of both organizations need to meet face-to-face with their salespeople as soon as possible to address rumors, reassure employees of their job security and discuss potential opportunities within the merged organization. Keep these presentations short and spend time listening to employee concerns.

Salespeople will — above all — want to know how the deal will affect them. For example:

  1. Will the sales forces of the two companies be combined?
  2. Will salespeople now be expected to sell the other company’s products or services?
  3. Will compensation and benefits change?
  4. How will the new sales department be structured, and who will manage it?

 

If you don’t know the answer to a question off hand, promise that you’ll respond as soon as possible — then keep your word. Following these meetings, salespeople can return to their work and communicate a consistent message to existing and potential customers.

Financial Incentives

Even the most loyal employee will consider a competitor’s offer if the price is right. So consider financial incentives, if you hope to retain top sales producers (and their customers) and encourage staff to cooperate with new colleagues and share knowledge.  Offering retention bonuses and rewards for maintaining and increasing sales — in addition to existing compensation plans — can help. Make such incentives easy to understand and clearly achievable. While interim bonus programs may be expensive in the near term, they can prevent sales from dropping off during the merger process. And they will help you generate far more long-term revenue to offset the immediate cost.

Ask the real experts

Because they work in the trenches, salespeople may have cross-selling and other ideas. Create a temporary sales leadership team to evaluate possible downside risk and increased sales potential. The team should include two to four seasoned salespeople who focus their efforts on retaining customers and maintaining sales during the integration.

There are many ways the team can help accomplish these goals. It can serve as a clearinghouse for customer concerns and employee confusion over the future of product and service offerings. Team members also might have ideas for new product and service offerings or combinations. Sales leaders can be valuable in identifying and monitoring at-risk accounts.

A fragile link

Although all personnel affected by a merger deserve honest communications and an opportunity to voice their concerns, it’s particularly important to keep salespeople in the loop. Your sales staff is your direct link to customers, and this link can be broken if it’s not handled with care.