Walk Before You Can Run

A Blue Print for Creating an IoT Enabled Field Service Organization

Despite the enormous benefits of IoT, field service leaders face many challenges to implementing IoT platforms.   First, many of these leaders have not defined a clear outcome for IoT projects.   In other words, they haven’t created solid use case or achieved clarity around what types of actions, decisions, or benefits they can obtain from IoT.  The possibilities are endless and often overwhelming.   Second, these leaders need to create a clear road map with respect to when, how, and where they will implement IoT.  Questions often exist as to whether they should implement IoT on their existing installed base or roll-out with new product releases.   Applying IoT to an existing installed base may seem like a time-consuming and arduous task.  However, the benefits that a FSO can achieve when a large segment of their installed base is IoT enabled is significant.  Third, IoT produces a vast volume of data.  FSOs are often not sure how they will make sense of all the data or how they will ensure that actionable and measurable results will be achieved from this information.   Fourth and most importantly, many field service leaders are concerned that they must overhaul their entire service delivery processes prior to taking advantage of IoT.  This seems like an impossible order when they may have millions of dollars invested in the current ways of doing things.

Implementing IoT does not have to be this challenging or complex.  Ultimately, field service leaders desire a solution that helps them achieve actionable and measurable results in a reasonable time frame.  More importantly, they want a solution that does not bog them down with tons and tons of meaningless data and one that enables them to work with their existing service delivery processes and systems infrastructure.

Quite often, corporations that implement IoT solutions do so within the context of a Digital Transformation (DX) initiatives.  These initiatives typically involve a complete re-design of the service model.  While they have positive impact on the customer experience and share-holder value in the long run, they maybe counter-productive to the near term objectives of field service leaders to support their customers’ installed base on an efficient and productive basis.  This is because DX initiatives require corporate buy-in, multi function coordination, dedicated investment capital, and considerable time to implement, whereas field service leaders are more pragmatic and want results now.

The best approach for field service leaders is one that enables them to implement IoT in parallel to larger, corporate DX initiatives. By doing so, FSOs can realize short term gains within the context of serving their current installed base using the FSO’s existing infrastructure and service business model.  This approach reduces the requirement to re-design the entire business model and postpone the realization of results that are possible through IoT.

Field service leaders can think of this transformation as “a walk before you run” approach to implementing IoT.  It requires field service leaders to think of IoT in terms of moving from a reactive service model, to conditional, to prescriptive and finally to a predictive service model.  Reactive service is the modus operandi of most of today’s FSOs.  Service is provided when the customer acknowledges they have a problem and request a solution.  Conditional service represents the next phase in the transition to IoT.  It uses IoT technology to monitor the customers’ installed base and provide alerts to the FSO that service is required. This enables the FSO to be more responsive to customer issues, ensure first time fix, and minimize downtime.  A prescriptive model is one in which the alert includes a recommendation or instruction about what action the FSO should take next.  Predictive service goes one step further. It monitors the customer’s installed base to anticipate service events and take corrective action before they occur thus avoiding downtime altogether and eliminate operating costs and overhead from the service operation.

The time for FSOs to think about implementing IoT is when they are replacing or upgrading their Field Service Management Software.  Perhaps the requirement for IoT alone is the primary reason why a FSO would want to upgrade or replace now.  Assuming this is the case, FSOs are advised to seek out software vendors who offer IoT feature functionality as part of a complete solution. This will minimize the number of moving parts (e.g., vendors, applications) that need to be included in the solution.  This in turn will lead to reduced implementation costs, an efficient process, and less headaches for the FSO.  In addition, it will ensure that the IoT solution works within the context of existing service delivery processes and procedures as opposed to the other way around.  In this way, FSOs can walk before they run.

 

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Augmented Reality State of the Art 

An Identification of Key Players 

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Considered to be one of the most defining technologies of our times, Augmented Reality(AR)  provides a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment and then augments (or supplements) this view with computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. AR improves users’ experience by enabling them to interact and learn from whatever they are observing.  Deployment of AR tools within a field service environment can have a measurable improvement on key performance indicators (KPIs) related to quality, productivity, and efficiency such as Mean Time to Repair, First Time Fix Rate, and Mean Time Between Failure.

The implementation of an AR solution requires integration of multiple components which must all function together to make the solution work.  First there is the viewer technology. Most often this takes the form of Smart Glasses or a mobile device such as a tablet or smart phone.  Next is the application which allows the device to read what the field service engineer (FSE) is seeing live and produce the additional content whether it be sound, video, graphics or GPS data.  In addition, many AR experiences rely on video from the onsite FSE to a control center or remote support personnel with special information or skills to assist the onsite FSE in completing the job.  Often the communication is done using a mobile device such as a smart phone or tablet.

In this blog we examine some of the key players in the AR space who have developed both use case scenarios and actual solutions for maintenance and field service environments:

APX

APX’s Skylight is an AR enterprise platform which integrates with smart glasses or other wearables.   It allows field service engineers to receive in-view instructions and obtain remote assistance with video from a central control center. It also has the ability to capture information at the onsite location and receive live data feeds to aid in field service.

AR Media

I-Mechanic is an AR application for smartphones that enable consumers or mechanics to perform maintenance on automobiles.  In addition it can provide consumers with useful information on closest auto repair and parts stores.

Epson: Moverio- Augmented Reality Glasses

The Moverio product uses sensors to provide onsite 3D Augmented Reality assistance while detecting issues and seeing images of what exists inside the components.  Additionally it provides one way video to a “control room” providing other resources for the onsite technician to successfully complete repair. One of the use cases for the Moverio product is the inspection and repair of HVAC systems  on cruise ships.

Fieldbit

An AR software platform allows for both 3-D overlay of information and remote instruction/collaboration with experts using video and smart phone technology. It also provides the ability to catalog issues and capture technical information enabling users to log and track reasons for equipment failure. Fieldbit is currently being used in maintenance of Print Equipment Manufacturers, Medical Equipment Manufacturers, Utility Providers, and Industrial Machinery.  Fieldbit recently partnered with cloud based, field service management software vendor ClickSoftware  to deliver faster, more effective field service repair resolution once the workforce arrives on site.

iQagent

iQagent is a mobile-based AR application for plant floor maintenance.   It scans QR codes to provide maintenance related information such as process data, schematics, and other resource.   It can be customized to read an individual organizations data and information from its database.

Microsoft

HoloLens – AR glasses which can be purchased as part of a commercial suite allowing for customization for enterprise use.  Current partners include Volvo, NASA, Trimble, and others.

NGrain

NGrain consists of a suite of AR applications including:

ProProducer –  platform to create virtual training simulations;
Viewer – companion to ProProducer to view and use the virtual simulations;
Android Viewer – allows access to content created using ProProducer from Android devices;
SDK – allows building of 3-D imaging to provide AR experience including both surface of objects and what is inside and underneath.

NGrain has also developed a number of industrial applications for its AR suite of products including but not limited to:

Consort – for inspection and damage assessment;
Envoy – providing real-time updates and information to field service engineers and allows communication between technicians;
Scout – Use Case – Aircraft Repair shop floor – real time visual analysis with Floor Manager oversite improving efficiency.

PTC

ThingWorx Studio is an AR offering developed by PTC for use in Industrial Enterprise. It combines the power of Vuforia, an AR platform, with the ThingWorx IoT Platform. These technologies offer new ways for the industrial enterprise to create, operate, and service products. For example, this technology can be used to monitor machine conditions in real-time and provide step by step instructions on the operation, maintenance, and repair of these machines.

Scope AR

Scope AR offers several applications to facilitate an AR platform within a field service environment. The Worklink application allows 3-D images and instructions to pop up on mobile or wearable devices thus enhancing the FSE’s ability to get information on site. To see a video click here.

Remote AR  allows onsite technicians to interface with remote support personnel, sending video feed to allow for collaboration and assistance to the onsite maintenance team. To see a video click here.

XMReality

A Swedish company whose product, XM Reality Remote Guidance, allows onsite technicians to use video to connect to a central control center to receive visual instructions from qualified technicians with the information on how to fix the onsite problem. Their products include Smart Glasses, a Guide Station from which to provide the remote assistance, a tablet, interface with mobile phones, and a heavy duty casing for Microsoft Surface Pros to be used in the field.

Although the AR market is in its early growth stages, the vendor landscape for these solutions is already quite vast.   We anticipate that more vendors will emerge while others evolve into more robust solution providers as the market continues to mature. There are of course many other applications for AR as well outside of field service and maintenance such as retail, consumer, building and more.  We hope that you will join the conversation and let us know about your experience with these and other companies in this marketplace.

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Make Way for a New Marketing Power:

Service Marketing

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In this week’s blog post, I am sharing an article that first appeared in Field Service Digital on July 15, 2016.  The article was written by Derek Korte, editor at Field Service Digital and a senior editor at Original9 Media.  

Thanks to technologies like the IoT, and enticed by the promise of more revenue and a cozier relationship with customers, traditional manufacturers are now getting in on the service game. It’s a shift that not only blurs the lines between manufacturing and service, but also how companies market those products and services.

Sure, tried-and-true product marketing strategies are still relevant, but service marketing is a different beast entirely, says Michael Blumberg, president of the Blumberg Advisory Group. Below, he explains service marketing’s growing importance — and why it’s so hard to do well.

Is service marketing now more important than product marketing?

It’s not that product marketing is less important, it’s that service marketing is becoming more important. There are several reasons why: First, many companies have made it a strategic priority to build and grow their service businesses. Second, they recognize that services can be sold independently from products and, in some cases, in lieu of products. Third, they recognize that service marketing is different from product marketing and a different approach is need. Fourth, they understand they have to step up their marketing game if they are going to generate more service business.

So products might sell themselves, but that’s not necessarily true with services?

That’s true. You can sell a product by showing the customer the great things it can do because it has cool features, such as the IoT and augmented reality. On the other hand, service is intangible.

There is nothing you can show or demonstrate to the customer before they buy it. Just because a product has certain features, doesn’t necessarily mean that they will buy the service and support that comes with it. This is different sale all together.

How do you convince customers to invest in an unfamiliar service — especially if they don’t immediately know why they need it?

You have to focus on the economic value to the customers of having (or not having) the service available when they need. When you understand that, you can start selling services around that value proposition. Companies that struggle with service marketing can’t explain this benefit to the customer. Instead, they talk about service as an insurance contract. That’s a very general term. It doesn’t tell them anything about how the service will be provided, when it will be provided, or what outcomes it will produce.

What are the biggest differences companies should consider when marketing services, rather than products?

In a product sale, you sell the customers on the form, fit, and function of the product:. You basically sell them reality: what it does, how it works, its dimensions, etc. When selling services, you also have to sell customers on perception: the outcome or defined level of service they can expect. Bear in mind, you also have to sell reality, which is also known as the actual capability to serve, by describing or showing all resources that make it possible to deliver that level of service.

Is it fair to say service marketing is a lot harder — and a lot more work — than product marketing?

It’s a lot harder for a couple of reasons. First, service is an afterthought for many companies. They think that because the customer owns the product, they’ll buy the services, too. That’s often not the case.

Secondly, you can’t market a service like you would a product. Marketers talk about the four principles or Ps of marketing — product, place, promotion and price. But those principles are product-oriented. They don’t work with services marketing. Why? Services are intangible, and it’s hard to market something that’s intangible. To market services, companies need a new mix — the Seven Principles.

Are new technologies changing how companies market their services?

Service technologies like IoT, Big Data, and even field service software enable companies to collect and analyze very granular data about service events, product usage, failure rates, etc.

This information enables them to offer very tailored and customized solutions to their customers in terms of service coverage, response time, pricing levels, etc. The technology also helps companies be more precise about who they market to, when they market to them, and what they market.

Any standout companies that are doing this well?

Siemens, GE, and Philips are doing a pretty good job in marketing their service. They’ve made service marketing a priority because they understand services’ strategic value to their bottom line. They have carefully designed their service portfolios and pricing strategies to meet customer needs and requirements.

Their service marketing and sales people are adept at articulating the economic value of their services, and they are properly trained and incentivized to sell those services. They are effectively leveraging technology to find new market opportunities and exploit existing ones.

Are you interested in growing your service business? Check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing ™. As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here.

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The Impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management – Part II

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As follow-up to last week’s blog post, I wanted to share some more answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the impact on IoT on Enterprise Service Management (ESM):

  1. What new skills sets are required to support an IoT environment?   IoT generates an extensive amount of real time data, some of which of is unstructured. In order to make use of this data in any meaningful way, a service provider will need to employ “data scientists”. These are individuals skilled at analyzing and interpreting data through predictive analytics.
  2. What impact will IoT have on Call Center personnel? The always on nature of IoT and its ability to send automatic alerts to the service organization will reduce the demand for personnel that handle basic call handling and dispatching procedures. However, there will be a greater need for remote support personnel with the ability to monitor service events in real-time, apply predictive analytics, and initiate corrective action.
  3. What will be the role for Field Service Engineers (FSE)? IoT has the ability to improve the percentage of service events that are resolved remotely without dispatching a FSE.   This does not necessarily equate to a diminished role for FSEs. In fact, the need for FSEs will increase. First, FSEs will be required to deploy IoT solutions. Second, FSEs will be needed to provide onsite diagnostics and troubleshooting when remote resolutions prove ineffective. Third, FSEs will function in the role of onsite consultant in helping the customer obtain maximum benefit from the technology operating at their site.
  4. How will IoT impact the Supply Chain?  Most people agree that IoT will enable Supply Chain personnel to proactively ship a replacement part or consumable to the end-customer before the customer is even aware of their need. The reverse logistics supply chain will also benefit from IoT in the sense that it will gain better visibility into events occurring at the field level that impact demand on return center and depot repair operations.

I know that these answers barely scratch the surface of the questions people have about the impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management (ESM).  In the weeks and months ahead, I will continue to share my insights on IoT and ESM.  As always, I am interested in other people’s perspectives on this subject.  Please feel free to post any comments, thoughts, or fun facts that could help advance the body of knowledge around this subject.

The Impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management – Part I

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Last week I attended the IFS World Conference 2015 in Boston, MA and participated in a panel on the subject of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its impact on Enterprise Service Management (ESM).   The other members of the panel included Adam Brody, Director of Enterprise Systems at Sysmex America, Inc. and Tom Bowe, Global Industry Director, IFS, Inc.   We were asked some great questions by our moderator Jon Briggs and members of the audience who were comprised of industry analysts, members of the press, and other influencers.

I am taking the liberty in this blog post of sharing some the key questions that were poised to us and the answers I provided.  Here they are:

  1. Which service industries will be affected by IoT?  It is hard to imagine any industry that will not be affected by IoT especially when it comes to the area of service and support.   As long as there is a way to connect a sensor to electronic or electromechanical equipment, there’s an opportunity for IoT.
  2. How will the end-customers benefit from IoT?  The conventional wisdom is that IoT enables proactive service management. If you can see what’s happening with the equipment in real-time, then you can predict and anticipate what may happen next. Pre-emptive actions could be taken to avoid downtime or prevent failure.
  3. What is the financial gain to manufacturers from IoT? Manufacturers can collect real-time data related to system reliability and maintainability issues which enable them to be more precise in managing service resources.   More importantly, IoT provides manufacturers with a vehicle for offering premium priced services like remote monitoring and diagnostics, automatic replenishment of consumables, and proactive service management.
  4. Will there be divergence in usage between B2B and B2C applications? It’s possible that some segments of the consumer market may be resistant to IoT because they believe that it intrudes on their personnel privacy.
  5. What are the challenges to IoT adoption? One of the biggest challenges to using IoT Technology to transform service management is that it requires updates to the existing technology infrastructure. Some technology out there is 10 years old. If you really want to adopt IoT throughout the enterprise, every piece of technology has to be IoT-enabled. That’s going to take some time. Another challenge is learning how to make use of all the data and information collected by IoT.

 

We covered a few other important topics in this panel discussion which I plan to share in next week’s blog post, so stay tuned.  You might also want to check out the article appearing in Tech Target from Laura Eberle titled “How is the IoT changing Enterprise Service Management?”   Laura did a great job covering the key salient points from this discussion.  Last but not least, I’d appreciate it if you could add to this conversation by sharing your perspective on IoT and what impact it will have on enterprise service management.

For whom the bell tolls: examining the future of field service

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I remember attending a conference in the early days of my career, circa 1987, where service executives from leading computer manufacturers at that time (e.g., Digital, Control Data Corporation, Burroughs, Univac, etc.) were predicting that field service would become extinct by the beginning of the 21st century.  Their prognosis was based on an observable trend that the equipment was becoming more reliable and easier to support remotely. Thirty (30) years later Field Service is a booming industry.

Indeed, many of these predications have come true. Technology has become cheaper and more reliable. Product life cycles are shorter, making it more affordable to replace older systems.  M2M and remote support make it possible for many companies to resolve an issue remotely and avoid dispatching a field service engineer. Self-service options also make it possible for the consumer to manage the repair process themselves.  It has also become an accepted fact that field service is a low margin business and extremely competitive in selected markets (e.g., IT).

Do these trends support the argument that field service is going the way of the dinosaur?  Market data points to a different conclusion. According to the research firm Markets and Markets, the Global market for Field Service Management (FSM) software is expected to grow from $1.58 billion in 2014 to $3.52 billion by 2019, at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 17.3%.  Certainly these figures do not suggest that field service is going to disappear anytime soon.

Although the High-Tech Industry has experienced a number of trends which challenge the need for field service, there have been a number of trends which will allow field service to continue to survive and prosper:

  1. Increased use of advanced technologies:  Tools such as dynamic scheduling, mobility, knowledge management, and spare parts planning software enable Field Service Organizations (FSOs) to optimize the coordination of resources (e.g., parts, labor) required to support the field service delivery process resulting in more satisfied customers, increased revenue, reduced cost and higher profits. Furthermore, disruptive technologies like IoT and Big Data provide FSOs with the tools to expand their service offerings and be more proactive in managing service delivery. As a result, customers are more dependent on FSOs than ever before for continued support.
  2. The advent of on-demand platforms: On-demand and SaaS based applications enable FSOs to obtain critical service applications required to manage the field service dispatch on a subscription basis. This permits FSOs to quickly acquire and deploy state-of-the art Field Service Management Systems (FSMS), which at one time required a considerable capital outlay. This means that FSOs can expense the costs associated with the new system into their operating budgets and profits and avoid building elaborate ROI justification models. As result, the economics associated with maintaining a Field Service workforce have improved.
  3. Greater complexity and convergence of technology: Every major technology sector ranging from information technology, to telecommunications, to plant automation and building controls, has experienced a trend of equipment becoming increasingly more integrated with microprocessors, hardware and network operating system software, broadband communications, and network connectivity equipment. This complexity has led to new requirements for fast, reliable, and high quality field service in many segments.
  4. Acceptance of trade-off between remote support and field service: Manufacturers now accept the fact that there are trade-offs in cost and customer satisfaction in attempting to resolve all service requests through remote support tactics. Although remote support can be very effective in lowering operating costs, and eliminating the need for field service dispatch, there is a point in every service call, where it becomes more effective to dispatch a Field Engineer. The greater the complexity of the service problem, the longer it will take to resolve remotely resulting in longer downtime for the customer and higher support cost for the service provider. Field service dispatch can mitigate these costs and help to resolve the issue sooner.
  5. Growth in Servitization: Manufacturers continue to look for opportunities to generate income through the provision of value added services such as installation, integration, configuration management, training and process improvement. Field Service Engineers represent the most likely resource for delivering these services. Furthermore, many Servitization business models have their foundation in IoT and connected devices. Manufacturers are of course turning to their FSOs to roll-out and deploy these solutions.

Why were the service executives in the late 1980s so far off in their predictions? I think it was because they could not anticipate how innovations in software and technology could go on creating new revenue opportunities. Conventional wisdom at that time viewed innovation as a way of cutting costs, and of course, the biggest cost, was people (e.g.., Field Service Engineers). More importantly, most companies viewed Field Service as a cost center, not as a profit center. As a result, they were not thinking strategically about innovation. It is amazing how things have changed. To quote the old Virginia Slims commercial, “we’ve come a long way baby.”

Now it is your turn. Please share with me your ideas on the future of field service.   Let me know if you remember any predications from the past that are no longer true today. Tell me about your vision of the future. Will field service continue to thrive or will field service engineers become irrelevant? I’d love to get your thoughts on this important topic.

5 New opportunities created by IoT and the challenges they present

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There has been some excitement in the media these days about the Internet of Things (IoT) and the promise it creates for businesses, consumers, and governments.  John Chambers, the CEO of Cisco, said on CNN’s GPS with Fareed Zakaria that IoT will create approximately $19 Trillion in economic value over the next 5 years.  As an example of the opportunities that are possible, Chambers points to the fact that the city of Barcelona created 40,000 new jobs through its connected city initiative.

While the upside potential is great, there are still many who believe that the disruptive force of IoT will have a negative impact on certain industries; eliminating jobs and destroying businesses instead of creating them. The proponents of IoT remind us that similar claims were made about the internet in its early days. However, according to a 2014 study by McKinsey and Company, 2.6 new jobs were created by the internet for every 1 job it eliminated. Will the same be true for IoT?

To answer this question, I think we have to look at how IoT will impact specific industries.  For example, let’s look at five (5) new opportunities that IoT creates for the High-Technology Service & Support Industry and the challenges they present.

  1. Facilitation of Remote Monitoring & Diagnostics: IoT makes it possible for manufacturers to implement remote monitoring and diagnostics solutions on a low cost and rapid basis. Of course, these solutions are as effective as the knowledge management tools behind them. Nevertheless, remote diagnostics can eliminate the number of emergency dispatches which in turn could have an impact on Field Service Engineer staffing levels. On the other hand, it is likely that new jobs will be created to monitor and analyze the data collected by these solutions as well as respond to the actions that are generated by this analysis.
  2. Greater integration with the supply chain: One the largest beneficiaries of IoT will be the service supply chain. By monitoring service related events, the service supply chain can have more visibility into the demand for spare parts and be more effective in planning and forecasting inventory stock levels. In addition, supply chain mangers can be more proactive in anticipating demands on forward stocking locations and depot repair & refurbishment centers. The net impact of IoT on the supply chain is an enhanced level of productivity and efficiency which is great for profits and job creation.
  3. Creation of barriers to entry: It is very possible that IoT will create new barriers to entry for service competitors. That is because once you control access to a device, you control the device itself. Manufacturers will need to think through how their channel partners participate in IoT solutions. Will channel partners participate in the revenue stream that comes from managing connected networks or will they simply resell the solution on behalf of the OEM? What options will be available when it comes to service & support? Will manufacturers implement open systems which make it possible for anyone to service the network or will be a closed solution keeping out competition?
  4. Collaboration between business partners: It is also likely that IoT solutions will be comprised of products and components from multiple suppliers. This will require greater collaboration between business partners. Manufacturers will need to establish new business protocols and rules of engagement when it comes to supporting IoT solutions involving third party products. This is likely to result in new job creation.
  5. Need for new business models:  IoT makes it possible for manufacturers to offer new added value services to their customers. At issue, these services are most likely to be monetized through subscription based models. New financial KPIs will be needed to manage these models. Instead of focusing on attach rates and gross margins, manufacturers will need to pay attention to monthly recurring revenue (MRR) and customer churn rates.   Revenue ramps up slowly under these scenarios and customer attrition rates are high so manufacturers will need to create marketing and onboarding programs to facilitate growth of MRR and reduce churn.

 

In summary, IoT will have a positive impact on the High Tech Service & Support Industry in terms of job creation and financial returns.  Indeed, IoT is likely to create multiple new jobs and businesses for everyone that it replaces.  While some companies and individuals may be at risk, they can mitigate the downside by taking a proactive approach to strategic planning.  Furthermore, companies who stand to benefit from IoT the most can ensure maximum returns, and thus double down on their investment, by incorporating fundamental strategic design principles into the development of IoT solutions.  To learn more, schedule a free consultation.

Strategic forces shaping the deployment of IoT & M2M

The Internet of Things

News about the Internet of Things (IoT) is everywhere. Indeed, IoT is one of the largest and fastest growing segments of the Information Technology industry.  The number of deployments of connected devices is forecasted to increase by 30% in 2015 from last year, according to The Gartner Group, with the total number of connected devices to reach 25 billion in 2020.

Those of us who have been involved with the High-Tech Service & Support Industry for some time will tell you that the concept of IoT and its cousin Machine to Machine (M2M) are nothing new. Remote Monitoring & Diagnostic tools have been around for decades.  As early as the mid-1980s, capital equipment manufacturers like Honeywell, Texas Instruments, and AT&T had deployed these solutions to improve the troubleshooting and maintenance of their systems.

At issue, it is only within the last couple of years that the number of IoT and M2M deployments has begun to sky-rocket.  Let’s look at some of the forces that are making this possible:

  • Social Forces: One of the reasons why I believe we are seeing a surge in connected devices within the High-Tech Service Industry is the recognition that data drives business. For service providers, it is no longer just about finding ways to reduce the time and cost associated with troubleshooting and maintenance. In order to optimize productivity and efficiency, and to facilitate innovation in a service business, you need data. While service executives have understood this for some time, end-customers now understand and appreciate that they also need access to this same data in order to optimize the operations and processes that comprise their enterprise. In essence, data about the condition of assets and machine performance is part of a larger system of systems which need to work in tandem to ensure that that the entire system works smoothly and efficiently.
  • Economic Forces: The cost of implementing IoT and M2M solutions has reduced significantly over the last decade. In the past, remote monitoring was achieved through dedicated land line data communications which were very costly to implement and maintain. Today communication is much more accessible and affordable through technologies like Internet Protocol, ZigBee, and Wireless. Furthermore, the cost of collecting data has improved significantly. Earlier solutions required expensive and clunky Programmable Logic Control (PLC) platforms. Now data collection is possible through low-cost, disposable sensors. Furthermore, the financial justification for IoT has improved. Not only is access to investment capital cheaper than ever but manufacturers are now finding ways to monetize IoT solutions resulting in a profitable revenue stream, higher ROI, and faster payback period. More importantly, the financial model associated with IoT deployments is changing. In the past, manufacturers would first attempt to sell individual customers on the benefit of adding remote monitoring to their capital equipment purchase. In turn, the customer needed to incorporate the cost of a Remote Monitoring solution into their capital expenditure and cash flow projections. The economics of IoT have now made it possible for service providers to make IoT solutions available as a subscription model, thus enabling end-customers to turn a high fixed cost investment into a variable expense.
  • Technology Forces: As noted above, the technology (e.g., data communications, sensors, etc.) associated with IoT and M2M is becoming cheaper, easier to implement, more secure, and flexible. In addition, we now have access to much more robust, cheaper, and flexible data repositories. Not only has the cost of storage improved but the advent of Big Data solutions enables us to leverage information collected by IoT in ways we have never known before.

 

For service executives who are dissatisfied with service being an afterthought in their organization, now is the time to look toward M2M and IoT as platforms for innovation and new sources of profitable revenue.    To achieve this outcome, service providers need to develop an overall service business strategy around IoT as opposed to merely a technology plan for connecting devices with back-end systems.   While addressing concerns with respect to security and risk are critical to any IoT deployment, the optimal strategy must incorporate a service centric philosophy, receive full endorsement by C-suite executives, and be formulated with active participation of the service leadership team.  Strategic design is critical to IoT success. For more information, schedule a free consultation.