References on Service and Support

Suggestions have been made for me to recommend books on the topic of service and support. Of course there are many written on the subject; however, most of these books tend to be focused on consumer related industries such as hospitality, restaurants, and personal care services which focuses primarily on either services marketing or customer service, not both.  Furthermore, some do not provide a holistic perspective on how to build, operate, or grow a profitable services business.  

Unfortunately, there are only a handful that deal with service in product related or high-tech manufacturing business.  The two books that come to my mind are Managing Service as  A Strategic Profit Center and Managing High Tech Service Using a CRM Strategy.   Both of these books were written by my late father, Donald F. Blumberg.  Although these were published in 1991 by McGraw Hill and 2003 by CRC Press respectively, the  content is still quite valuable and relevant to today’s high-tech service and support organizations. To those reading this blog, you are probably interested in learning more about recent publications.

Given my interest and experience in all things service related, I began to research and identify books published in the last 3-5 years on the topic of service and support.  What interested me most were those that provided a holistic or strategic perspective on service management as opposed to those that focused solely on one aspect, like customer service.  On top of this interest was to also find publications distributed by the commercial book trade which helped me to learn those publishers who are willing to invest in authors writing on the topic of service and support.   While my research was not exhaustive by any stretch of the imagination, I was surprised to learn there are not many books published on this subject by the commercial trade. My view is that they are clearly missing a large and growing market opportunity.

A description of a few books that match my search criteria are found below:

Made to Serve: How Manufacturers can Compete Through Servitization and Product Service Systems

By Timothy Baines and Howard Lightfoot

Publisher – John Wiley Sons, Apr 9, 2013 – Business & Economics – 272 pages

Made to Serve provides readers with a framework for determining the feasibility of adopting a services-led competitive strategy, along with strategies for designing and implementing the kinds of service offerings customers expect when they purchase technology.

Designing & Managing Industrial Product Service Systems

By Petri Helo, Angappa Gunasekaran and Anna Rymaszewska

Publisher – Springer International Publications, Aug 27, 2016 – Business & Economics – 101 pages

This book analyzes how companies can manage the transition from products to services. Examines the role of marketing and operations strategy, and how actual service delivery takes place. It also considers the pricing decisions that need to be made when moving from a product focused model to a service oriented model.

Profiting from Services and Solutions: What Product-Centric Firms Need to Know

By Valarie A. Zeithaml and Stephen W. Brown Business

Publisher – Expert Press, Aug 15, 2014 – Business & Economics – 132 pages

This book is written for executives in companies that manufacture or sell products.  The authors provide a framework for how a manufacturing company can transition from selling products to services and solutions. 

I do hope you can find the time to read these books and perhaps provide us with your feedback.  If you are interested, we’d be happy to publish a 500 -850 word book review from this blog site.  Also, please feel free to recommend any other books you think your peers in service and support might be interested in reading. 

Question: Reading Recommendations? Comments? Thank you! You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Plan Today for an Amazing Future Tomorrow

I love this time of the year.  It’s not just because of the holiday season and the chance to spend time with friends and family.  I like this time of the year because it gives me time to reflect on the past 12 months and set goals for the next 12.   Goal setting can be daunting task for many of us.   Quite often people set goals without giving thought to the impact they have on various parts of their life.  For example, they might set a goal for one aspect of their life only to learn several months latter that while they achieved this goal other areas are suffering like their health, relationship, or finances.

You might be wondering why I am writing goal setting in a blog devoted to business issues. Why am I concerned with this topic? Why should you be concerned with it too?  The answer is that I am a big proponent of goal setting. It is required if we are going to obtain any results in our life.  More importantly, I believe that how we show up in one area of our life impacts how we show up in other areas of our life.   For example, our ability to advance in business may be directly related to our relationships at home or vice versa.

The truth is that we can design an amazing life for ourselves and “run on all cylinders” as I like to refer to the feeling of success and fulfillment in all areas of our life.   Effective goal setting, requires that we first assess each part of our life and determine where we need to achieve better results.   If our health is at a 10 and our relationships are at a 6, doesn’t it make sense to set some goals in this area rather then spending more time at the gym.

Basically, if we are going to make progress in the key areas of our life we need to head the adage …. “What you don’t measure, you can’t improve.”

If we don’t measure those areas of our life that are important, it’s hard to improve them. You must know where you are now before you can move beyond it.

That’s why I thought you might be interested in accessing this great tool from New York Times bestselling author Michael Hyatt…

This online self-assessment is easy, quick, and effective in helping you measure where you are in each domain of your life. It shows you where you’re excelling and where you should focus your improvement efforts.

But you can only get the assessment for a limited time. It’s FREE, so check it out today!

All you do is quickly rate yourself in each of life’s major domains.  You read a series of descriptive statements and pick the one that most closely aligns with where you perceive yourself to be. You then refine a bit based on your unique situation. It all adds up to your LifeScore™.

It’s simple. But I promise it will instantly show you your opportunities to grow this year.

The assessment is 100% free, but it’s only available for a few days.

If you want to improve something, start measuring it. finally gives us an easy way to do this for every area of  our lives. Here’s where to find out your number!

After you’ve completed the assessment please post your score below and share with us what you’ve learned about yourself from your score.

Schedule a Free 30 Minute Consultation with Michael

The Most Empowering Question You Can Ask

question-mark-colorful-r

Have you ever felt stuck when it comes to growing your service business? For example, you feel that things are stagnant or perhaps just not going as well as you’d like.  If your answer is yes, then chances are that you have been doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome.  That’s called insanity!!

You know you need to make a change but you are not exactly sure how.

All of us in business have at one time or another felt this way.  Most people in this situation ask themselves…”What should I do?”  “What should I do to get better results?”   The truth is this is a poor question to ask.  It is a poor question to ask because it is a disempowering question.

Disempowering questions seldom give us new insights or perspectives that lead to real change.  This is because our mind always tries to find a way of answering our questions. When you ask yourself “What should I do to increase service sales?” you come up with a million different answers.  One answer may be advertising, so you spend money on advertising only to find that it doesn’t help. You may again ask yourself, what should I do to increase sales, and your mind answers…”invest in Search Engine Optimization (SEO)”.  You invest in SEO, yet still you observe little or no improvement.

You continue to ask yourself the same question over and over again and get answers like do more networking, do thought leadership marketing, do price discounts . . . but still no improvement.  Soon you find yourself running around in circles doing different things. You keep doing more and more different things in hopes of getting better results but nothing happens. That’s crazy!  If you keep this up, soon you are likely to hear a small voice inside your head say “Woe is me, what should I do, I don’t know what to do, poor me!”

Poor you is right!

Can you see why asking yourself “What I can do to increase sales?” is a disempowering question?  Asking this type of question creates a vicious cycle that you have to break before it breaks you.  You can break it by learning how to ask empowering questions.  The most empowering question you need to ask and answer if you are trying to grow your service business is, “What value does my company bring to the marketplace?” In other words, what is you value proposition?

The truth is you can’t improve your sales until you are clear about the value you provide. Without a clear value proposition, spending money on advertising, incentives, networking, and other forms of marketing is throwing good money after bad.

In order to define your value proposition you have to answer 3 additional questions:

  1. Whom do I serve?
  2. What problem do I help them solve?
  3. What results do I help them achieve?

These answers provide input to the value proposition formula, which goes something like this…l help X, solve Y, so that Z. Here, X is the answer to the question, whom do I serve; Y identifies what problem you help them solve; and Z clarifies the results you help them achieve.

For example, my value proposition is, I help service managers and executives gain access to new perspectives, strategies, and insights about service management so that they can increase sales, boost profits, and delight their customers.

Once you determine you value proposition and consistently apply it you’ll achieve better results:

  • You’ll gain clarity about whom you help
  • You’ll be more certain about how you help them
  • You’ll be more effective in finding more people like them
  • You’ll find yourself working with people who really understand and appreciate the value you provide them
  • You’ll close more sales

Remember, if you are feeling stuck in your business or career, and nothing seems to be working, you are probably asking yourself disempowering questions. Break the cycle of despair by asking empowering questions, instead!

Now it’s your turn.  Complete the value proposition formula (I help X, solve Y, so that Z) and share it with us in the Comments section.  We’d love to learn what you’ve developed and how you think it has helped or will help you company get more business.  If you need ideas about what to do now that you’ve developed your value proposition, schedule a free consultation today.

Make Way for a New Marketing Power:

Service Marketing

Power image

In this week’s blog post, I am sharing an article that first appeared in Field Service Digital on July 15, 2016.  The article was written by Derek Korte, editor at Field Service Digital and a senior editor at Original9 Media.  

Thanks to technologies like the IoT, and enticed by the promise of more revenue and a cozier relationship with customers, traditional manufacturers are now getting in on the service game. It’s a shift that not only blurs the lines between manufacturing and service, but also how companies market those products and services.

Sure, tried-and-true product marketing strategies are still relevant, but service marketing is a different beast entirely, says Michael Blumberg, president of the Blumberg Advisory Group. Below, he explains service marketing’s growing importance — and why it’s so hard to do well.

Is service marketing now more important than product marketing?

It’s not that product marketing is less important, it’s that service marketing is becoming more important. There are several reasons why: First, many companies have made it a strategic priority to build and grow their service businesses. Second, they recognize that services can be sold independently from products and, in some cases, in lieu of products. Third, they recognize that service marketing is different from product marketing and a different approach is need. Fourth, they understand they have to step up their marketing game if they are going to generate more service business.

So products might sell themselves, but that’s not necessarily true with services?

That’s true. You can sell a product by showing the customer the great things it can do because it has cool features, such as the IoT and augmented reality. On the other hand, service is intangible.

There is nothing you can show or demonstrate to the customer before they buy it. Just because a product has certain features, doesn’t necessarily mean that they will buy the service and support that comes with it. This is different sale all together.

How do you convince customers to invest in an unfamiliar service — especially if they don’t immediately know why they need it?

You have to focus on the economic value to the customers of having (or not having) the service available when they need. When you understand that, you can start selling services around that value proposition. Companies that struggle with service marketing can’t explain this benefit to the customer. Instead, they talk about service as an insurance contract. That’s a very general term. It doesn’t tell them anything about how the service will be provided, when it will be provided, or what outcomes it will produce.

What are the biggest differences companies should consider when marketing services, rather than products?

In a product sale, you sell the customers on the form, fit, and function of the product:. You basically sell them reality: what it does, how it works, its dimensions, etc. When selling services, you also have to sell customers on perception: the outcome or defined level of service they can expect. Bear in mind, you also have to sell reality, which is also known as the actual capability to serve, by describing or showing all resources that make it possible to deliver that level of service.

Is it fair to say service marketing is a lot harder — and a lot more work — than product marketing?

It’s a lot harder for a couple of reasons. First, service is an afterthought for many companies. They think that because the customer owns the product, they’ll buy the services, too. That’s often not the case.

Secondly, you can’t market a service like you would a product. Marketers talk about the four principles or Ps of marketing — product, place, promotion and price. But those principles are product-oriented. They don’t work with services marketing. Why? Services are intangible, and it’s hard to market something that’s intangible. To market services, companies need a new mix — the Seven Principles.

Are new technologies changing how companies market their services?

Service technologies like IoT, Big Data, and even field service software enable companies to collect and analyze very granular data about service events, product usage, failure rates, etc.

This information enables them to offer very tailored and customized solutions to their customers in terms of service coverage, response time, pricing levels, etc. The technology also helps companies be more precise about who they market to, when they market to them, and what they market.

Any standout companies that are doing this well?

Siemens, GE, and Philips are doing a pretty good job in marketing their service. They’ve made service marketing a priority because they understand services’ strategic value to their bottom line. They have carefully designed their service portfolios and pricing strategies to meet customer needs and requirements.

Their service marketing and sales people are adept at articulating the economic value of their services, and they are properly trained and incentivized to sell those services. They are effectively leveraging technology to find new market opportunities and exploit existing ones.

Are you interested in growing your service business? Check out my online training course where you will learn strategies, tactics, and insights for Successful Service Marketing ™. As a starter, I’ve put together a brief video that describes the course content. You can access it here.

Got a question? Click here to schedule a free consultation

The Impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management – Part I

iot 1

Last week I attended the IFS World Conference 2015 in Boston, MA and participated in a panel on the subject of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its impact on Enterprise Service Management (ESM).   The other members of the panel included Adam Brody, Director of Enterprise Systems at Sysmex America, Inc. and Tom Bowe, Global Industry Director, IFS, Inc.   We were asked some great questions by our moderator Jon Briggs and members of the audience who were comprised of industry analysts, members of the press, and other influencers.

I am taking the liberty in this blog post of sharing some the key questions that were poised to us and the answers I provided.  Here they are:

  1. Which service industries will be affected by IoT?  It is hard to imagine any industry that will not be affected by IoT especially when it comes to the area of service and support.   As long as there is a way to connect a sensor to electronic or electromechanical equipment, there’s an opportunity for IoT.
  2. How will the end-customers benefit from IoT?  The conventional wisdom is that IoT enables proactive service management. If you can see what’s happening with the equipment in real-time, then you can predict and anticipate what may happen next. Pre-emptive actions could be taken to avoid downtime or prevent failure.
  3. What is the financial gain to manufacturers from IoT? Manufacturers can collect real-time data related to system reliability and maintainability issues which enable them to be more precise in managing service resources.   More importantly, IoT provides manufacturers with a vehicle for offering premium priced services like remote monitoring and diagnostics, automatic replenishment of consumables, and proactive service management.
  4. Will there be divergence in usage between B2B and B2C applications? It’s possible that some segments of the consumer market may be resistant to IoT because they believe that it intrudes on their personnel privacy.
  5. What are the challenges to IoT adoption? One of the biggest challenges to using IoT Technology to transform service management is that it requires updates to the existing technology infrastructure. Some technology out there is 10 years old. If you really want to adopt IoT throughout the enterprise, every piece of technology has to be IoT-enabled. That’s going to take some time. Another challenge is learning how to make use of all the data and information collected by IoT.

 

We covered a few other important topics in this panel discussion which I plan to share in next week’s blog post, so stay tuned.  You might also want to check out the article appearing in Tech Target from Laura Eberle titled “How is the IoT changing Enterprise Service Management?”   Laura did a great job covering the key salient points from this discussion.  Last but not least, I’d appreciate it if you could add to this conversation by sharing your perspective on IoT and what impact it will have on enterprise service management.

Treat salespeople like the valuable assets they are

sales people 3

With so much merger and acquisition activity occurring within the High Tech Industry, I thought it would make sense to understand how sellers should deal with their most valuable assets, their salespeople.  I posed this question to my friend and business partner, Joe Vanore at Everingham & Kerr, who gave me permission to republish this article from the company’s June/July 2014 newsletter….

Knowledgeable, experienced salespeople with strong customer relationships are worth their weight in gold — or perhaps the premium paid to acquire their company. So the last thing you want to do as you integrate your acquisition is alienate this valuable group of employees. Instead, focus on convincing sales staff of your merger’s merits and involving them in the planning process.

Thwarting the competition

As soon as your deal is announced, competitors are likely to contact your target’s customers to persuade them to jump ship, claiming that your combined organization will be too big or bureaucratic to effectively serve them. Competitors will also attempt to recruit your best salespeople.

Act quickly to thwart competitors’ efforts and reap the benefits that attracted you to the transaction in the first place. Help salespeople communicate the deal to customers by preparing a script that explains expected changes and how customers will benefit. Include FAQs and provide the name of a person in the organization who can answer questions your sales staff can’t.

Face to face meetings

Also be sensitive to the morale in the sales department. It’s not enough to communicate upcoming events via e-mail. CEOs of both organizations need to meet face-to-face with their salespeople as soon as possible to address rumors, reassure employees of their job security and discuss potential opportunities within the merged organization. Keep these presentations short and spend time listening to employee concerns.

Salespeople will — above all — want to know how the deal will affect them. For example:

  1. Will the sales forces of the two companies be combined?
  2. Will salespeople now be expected to sell the other company’s products or services?
  3. Will compensation and benefits change?
  4. How will the new sales department be structured, and who will manage it?

 

If you don’t know the answer to a question off hand, promise that you’ll respond as soon as possible — then keep your word. Following these meetings, salespeople can return to their work and communicate a consistent message to existing and potential customers.

Financial Incentives

Even the most loyal employee will consider a competitor’s offer if the price is right. So consider financial incentives, if you hope to retain top sales producers (and their customers) and encourage staff to cooperate with new colleagues and share knowledge.  Offering retention bonuses and rewards for maintaining and increasing sales — in addition to existing compensation plans — can help. Make such incentives easy to understand and clearly achievable. While interim bonus programs may be expensive in the near term, they can prevent sales from dropping off during the merger process. And they will help you generate far more long-term revenue to offset the immediate cost.

Ask the real experts

Because they work in the trenches, salespeople may have cross-selling and other ideas. Create a temporary sales leadership team to evaluate possible downside risk and increased sales potential. The team should include two to four seasoned salespeople who focus their efforts on retaining customers and maintaining sales during the integration.

There are many ways the team can help accomplish these goals. It can serve as a clearinghouse for customer concerns and employee confusion over the future of product and service offerings. Team members also might have ideas for new product and service offerings or combinations. Sales leaders can be valuable in identifying and monitoring at-risk accounts.

A fragile link

Although all personnel affected by a merger deserve honest communications and an opportunity to voice their concerns, it’s particularly important to keep salespeople in the loop. Your sales staff is your direct link to customers, and this link can be broken if it’s not handled with care.

Seven Ways to Win at Service Marketing

Market-Research1

Revenue growth is probably the single most important objective for executives who are responsible for managing service as a profit center or strategic line of business.  “I want to double my service revenue in the next 3-5 years” is an incantation that I hear constantly from business owners and executives.  That equates to a 20% or more growth rate per year.  Sure, this type of growth is easily achievable if the market is growing at this rate or faster.  I’ve found that these high growth targets are often triggered by management’s desire to take back market share from competitors or increase the share of service revenue contribution to overall corporate revenue.

While high revenue growth in a low growth market is difficult, it’s not impossible. A little hard work is usually required to achieve this type of performance.  To understand where the emphasis is needed, let’s look at where service market programs may fall short:

  1. Service Portfolio not meeting customer needs: Quite often service providers fail to meet their revenue objectives because their service portfolio is no longer meeting customer requirements. In other words, they have failed to offer services tailored to their customer needs. For example, offering only next day response when customers require same day.
  2. Pricing not optimal: If your revenue is flat or declining, you might want to look at how you price your services. Perhaps you service prices are no longer competitive. On the other hand, you may be underpricing your services in relation to the value you provide.
  3. Failure to understand competitive threats:   Many service providers, particularly those that are divisions of manufacturers, fail to understand the competitive threat of “mom & pop” third party maintenance (TPM) companies and/or in-house service providers.  For example, they often under estimate the value that TPMs provide to their customer and/or fail to develop an effective value proposition to compete against them.
  4. Failure to articulate value: How well have you articulated the value of your service offering to current and prospective customers? Do they understand the cost of downtime or the pain points that your services help solve? It is important that you not only articulate value to your customers but make sure that your sales people understand it and provide them with the appropriate sale aides and marketing collateral to support it. 
  5. Lack of communication & follow-up: One way to increase service revenue is by improving contract renewal rates. These rates often decline though lack of consistent communication and persistent follow-up about the value of services provided, when contracts are up for renewal, special incentives for renewing, and information on when they are about to expire. 
  6. Not asking for referrals: Referrals are the best and least expensive source of qualified prospects. The problem is most service providers forget to ask for them. Remember your customers speak to each other. They may be involved in the same networks and trade associations, or call on each other for advice and guidance. Why not enlist them in your business development efforts? 
  7. Lack of customer appreciation:    Your customers will remain loyal to you and purchase more from you when you let them know how much you value and appreciate them. It’s the simple things like a courtesy phone call/visit, thank you card, small gift (i.e., rewards program), or special offer that let them know you value their business.

 

These seven areas have one thing in common, they all benefit from market research.  Whether its information that will help you redesign your service portfolio or modify pricing, market research provides you with an unbiased and unfiltered perspective on what your customers are actually thinking and saying. You will learn things that you may not otherwise from a sale’s call or courtesy call made by a company executive.

Before you conduct research or make any changes, it is important that you have a baseline assessment of how well you service marketing program is working. You may want to consider an audit from an independent and objective industry consultant.     Schedule a free consultation today to learn more.

Strategic Value Drivers of High-Tech Service

strategic value 3

In order for a business to succeed it must have a clearly defined strategic value that it provides to shareholders, stakeholders (e.g., customers, suppliers, employees,) and the market place at large.  It is important to clearly define strategic value since it is the precursor to developing a value proposition and mission statement.  Furthermore, it forms the basis for the strategies, tactics, and programs that a business puts into place.

Nowhere is strategic value more important than in the High-Tech Service Industry.  All too often, service providers, especially those that are divisions of product companies (e.g., OEMs, VARs, Distributors) fail to clearly define their strategic value.  As a result, they fail to make any impact in reaching their business goals and objectives.   They are like a ship on an ocean without a sail, drifting aimlessly in whatever direction the winds blow.

We have found that there are at least three (3) common strategic values that High Tech  Service  & Support organization might chose to pursue/adopt. These include:

  1. Directly influencing the sale and adding value – A company who adopts this strategic value recognizes that service is very critical to the customer in their final selection to purchase a product.   In other words, it’s a value-added feature influencing the purchase decision. Dell is a great example of a company who uses service as a way of directly influencing the sale of products.
  2. Generating revenue and profits directly – This applies to any company that operates their service business as a profit center or strategic line of business. These companies recognize that customers are willing to pay for service independently from purchasing equipment. More importantly, their willingness to pay is based on the value-in-use of the service not it terms of the perceived cost. Much of IBM’s success in the 1990s was due to their ability to generate revenue and profits from directly selling services.
  3. Providing market control – Companies who embrace this value driver provide a broad array of services in order to gain account control. In essence, they engulf their customers with an extensive portfolio of basic and value added services in attempt to establish a trusted advisor position and influence future sales. GE is a prime example of a company that has achieved this result by offering its customers technology assessments, strategic planning, and other types of professional and value added services.

 

When establishing your strategic value it is important to select one and only one value driver.  Otherwise, it will lead to inconsistent performance and confusion in the market place. Strategic value cannot be defined in a vacuum, it must take into account the needs and requirements of your key stakeholders and align with your overall corporate strategy. For example, a company focused on generating services revenues and profits directly may find this goal at odds with its objective to increase market share in its product market.  Basically, the service division would be competing with the products line of business for resources and investments.   More importantly, your definition of strategic value will determine where you focus in terms of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), such as investment considerations, business constraints you must optimize, and possible market outcomes.

Strategic value when set into motion is difficult to alter since your entire service program and corporate objectives are based on this.  It often takes a commitment from the C-suite and/or board of directors as well as persistent and consistent follow through from management to successfully redefine your strategic value in terms of measurable outcomes.   This change should not be pursued lightly.  Those who succeed at redefining their strategic value often do so after very serious consideration, typically involving strategic market analysis, risk assessment, and scenario planning.

Strategic value is the DNA of your service business. If defined poorly, your strategic value maybe a liability and bankrupt your company.  If designed optimally and implemented effectively it can lead to unlimited upside potential.

Strategic Market Analysis – The Foundation for Smarter Business Decisions

strategic market analysis 2

Strategic market analysis is the solid foundation from which to build your business intelligence. Having careful, objective and professional analysis of the market place, competition, internal resources and capabilities and assessing future trends built on hard data and evidence is paramount.

All Companies have a critical need for strategic market analysis. Strategic market analysis provides an understanding of the market in which you are competing. Here are a few of the questions where you can achieve insights:

  1. What’s the total market opportunity?
  2. What is our current market share?
  3. Who are our main competitors?
  4. Is this a market we should be investing in or planning to exit?
  5. Should we consider merging, acquiring or selling?
  6. What market trends can we take advantage of, or do we need to address to grow?
  7. Does our business plan reflect market wants?
  8. Are there market niches we are missing, or should be growing?
  9. What are the market segments that are growing, or declining?
  10. Are we missing any important market segment opportunities?
  11. Do we have a deep understanding of our competitors which will allow us to exploit their weaknesses?

 

Planning and Allocating Market Analysis Resources
Planning and allocating resources for strategic market analysis is essential whether your needs are for proprietary or off-the-shelf research. The value proposition in making a sound purchase decision should come down to the strategic value of the information vs. the cost. When trying to make decisions, the place to start is with the most accurate and up-to-date information you can get . Outdated or bad information will result in a cascading effect of bad decisions. Because of this, allocating sufficient resources for strategic market analysis and business intelligence is absolutely necessary. These costs are insignificant compared to the capital, assets, and business failure you risk by making bad decisions based on flawed or obsolete data.

One note of caution, you should be of aware is that lower cost off-the-shelf research when not used for its intended purpose of broad view and general trend information will in the end cost more than proprietary research.

Proprietary Research or Off-the-Shelf Research
The important key to whether proprietary custom or off-the-shelf research is best for you depends. It depends upon answers to questions like these:

  1. Why do you need the data?
  2. Are you simply in need of broad trend data?
  3. Do you need it to plan and allocate operational resources?
  4. Do you need specific information on sub-segments of the market?
  5. Is having a deep dive on the competition required?
  6. Will you need data to enhance buying & decision making processes?
  7. Do you need strategic and market analysis?

 

Bottom line proprietary market research is the choice for comprehensive and specific information that allows you to make informed operational and tactical decisions. Also when you need more data points like:

  1. Market size and forecasts by product or region
  2. Deep dive competitive information
  3. Understanding market behavior, needs and wants
  4. Analyzing your capabilities to deliver against market needs
  5. The help of a market expert to leverage industry data from a proprietary databases

 

Off-the-Shelf market research is best for a broad view of the market without a lot of specifics. This type of market research attempts to satisfy the needs of most people wanting to gain a high level view of a market or industry.

When off-the-shelf or Internet research is used as the method for obtaining market data it is often referred to as a “Swiss cheese” approach. However, the problem, as we know with Swiss cheese, is that it has holes in it. This method is fraught with issues like:

  1. quality of the data
  2. old data, freshness of the data
  3. not getting the whole picture
  4. comparing apples to oranges

 

This approach is like trying to build a jig saw puzzle with pieces from different puzzles. Is this what you want as the foundation for your decision making?

Take Away

No matter the type of market research, the important point to remember is that no successful business goes to market without all the market research it can obtain and continues to utilize market research on a consistent basis to remain successful.

The building blocks to Servitization

servitization1

The “Servitization” of Manufacturing is taking the High-Tech Industry by storm!  By definition, Servitization is a transformation from selling products to delivering services.  It typically involves two components:

  1. The idea of a product-service system – an integrated product and service offering that delivers value in use.
  2. A “Servitized” organization which designs, builds and delivers an integrated product and service offering that delivers value in use

In more practical terms Servitization turns the product–service offering into a “utility” that the customer pays for on a subscription basis.   Under this model, the customer pays a monthly or annual fee equal to the amortized cost of the equipment plus the value of services provided for a specified period of time.

The concept of Servitization is nothing new. As early as the 1950’s, manufacturers provided their customers with the option to lease equipment with services attached to the lease agreement.  In the late 1990s and early 2000s, companies like ABB and GE begin to offer tperformance based service contracts to their customers.

Servitization is more than just a pricing strategy.  It is an overall business model that attempts to maximize and monetize value in use to the end-customer. This requires a manufacturer to proactively identify all the services that an end-customer may require over the lifecycle of equipment operation, understand the value that the customer assigns to these services, build this value into the subscription pricing model, and then deliver on that promise.

The trend toward Servitization has picked up steam in recent years for a number of reasons. First, market participants (i.e., OEMs and End-customers) have a greater appreciation of the strategic value of service to their overall business models.  Second, manufacturers recognize that service can generate more revenue over the lifecycle of the equipment than the actual purchase price of the equipment itself.  Third, the Great Recession forced many manufacturers to rethink the economics associated with how their customers justify the acquisition of new equipment.  Fourth, service tools and technology are now available that facilitates the design and operation of an integrated product-service system in a cost effective and real-time basis.

Ultimately, it’s the technology that is having the greatest impact on advancing Servitization business models.  There are some basic building blocks that any company will need to implement in order to deliver on the promise of Servitization. First, they’ll need a state-of-the-art service management system. It needs to perform the basic activities involved in managing a service organization (e.g., dispatch, scheduling, parts management, etc.). Second, they’ll need to have a way to connect with and monitor the condition of equipment within their serviceable installed base.  They will also need to integrate this information into to their back-end service management system. The third step is a mobility solution to communicate with people in the field. Finally, analytics are needed to evaluate what’s happening. Most companies will probably benefit by using a big data solution, as well, so they can look at unstructured data from their installed base and the customer’s environment at large, and start to analyze, predict and forecast.

In summary, Servitization is a transformational process that requires manufacturers to rethink all aspects of their business from marketing and sales, to pricing and financial management, to service delivery infrastructure.  The benefits of Servitization are great including the ability to build a multiyear annuity stream, gain account control, and create deeper and longer lasting relationships with customers.

I’d love to get your thoughts on Servitization.  Let me know if your company is pursuing Servitization.  What benefits do you expect to achieve? What obstacles remain in the way to realizing these benefits?   Last but not least, if feel free to schedule a strategy session with me if you want to discuss how Servitization could impact your business.