The Role of Data in the Servitization Journey

Data is becoming more important as we consider one of the most significant trends impacting the technology industry, "Servitization".

Several years ago, Blumberg Advisory Group worked with a company that provided hardware maintenance on film based photo labs found in big box retail outlets. Their service revenues and profits were declining because digital photography was replacing the need for film based photo labs. Although the client offered a new digital based technology to replace film based photo-labs, these systems were not being installed at the same rate as the older systems were being phased out.   Digital systems didn’t require as much service and support. They were less complex and easier to maintain than their film-based cousins.

Our client required a new strategy to offset their declining revenues and profits.  They needed a solution urgently or the parent company would shut down this division.  If we did not know the importance of data or the concept of managing the capability to serve, we would have probably recommended that the client lay off some of its field service workforce to reduce costs and improve profits.  This could have led to a downward spiral of layoffs, company morale and growth.

So what steps did we take?  We analyzed their data.  We reviewed their field engineer utilization rates, customer response times, field engineer skill levels, and the equipment on customers’ premises.  In conclusion, we found that their field engineers were not being completely utilized.  We found out that these engineers had further knowledge and expertise in supporting other types of equipment found on the customer site.  They were typically able to respond to a customer request within four hours even though the guarantee was for eight.  

Based on our analysis, we recommended that they expand their service footprint to other types of equipment located on the customers’ premises, i.e. electronic cash registers and point of sale equipment.  We also recommended that they charge a premium price to customers who required faster (e.g., 4 hour) response time.  As a result, this client went from losing 20% of their profits per year to a 50% increase in new business within 24 months of implementing our recommendations.

Ultimately, the key to our client’s success lied within the data.  Data is becoming more important as we consider one of the most significant trends impacting the Technology Industry, “Servitization”.  This trend describes the transformation that many companies are undertaking as they move from primarily selling products to generating a sizable portion of revenue and profits from services.   Ultimately, the path toward Servitization leads companies toward offering anything as a service (XaaS).  In other words, their business has reached the stage of development where they are no longer selling products or solutions to their customers, but outcomes.   For example, instead of selling a copier machine they are selling their customer the right to use the machine to produce a certain number of copies over a specific period or time.

To deliver on this promise, the provider must not only have great people, process, and technology but access to data related in terms of machine condition and performance (e.g., alerts and notifications), parts availability, field engineer location and skill sets, diagnostics, etc.  With this data in hand, the provider can ensure resources are available when needed and that the customer receives the outcome it purchased.  The data is made available through technologies like the Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, etc.   Examples of companies that are along the servitization journey are Rolls Royce, ABB, Siemens, Kone, and General Electric. They have generated profitable income and know that a truly exceptional service business is built on four foundations – people, process, technology, and data.

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Field Service: A Mid Year Review

Opportunities, challenges, and what lies ahead

Now that we are half way through 2018, I wanted to take some time to look at where the Field Service industry is right now.  Here are some of my thoughts on the biggest struggles facing Field Service Organizations (FSO), where some of the greatest opportunities lie, and what trends to look for in the coming months and years.

Field Service Organizations must continuously strive to maintain customer satisfaction while operating within various business constraints (e.g., cost reduction, revenue targets, labor shortages, etc.).  The challenge is these objectives are often in conflict. On one hand, companies must keep customers happy; on the other, they must find ways to lower costs and do more with less. In addition, they must keep up with innovations in technology and find ways to deliver an exceptional customer experience. At the same time, they must find ways to monetize technology investments without gauging the customer on price. Meanwhile, field service leaders in these companies are bombarded by data and information about where to invest their time, effort, and resources. This of course presents a challenge of its own.

In broad terms, FSOs should be seizing opportunities that make the highest and best use of their most expensive resources, namely talent and capital. What does this mean exactly? The answer is investments that simultaneously fulfill multiple objectives such as cost reduction, quality and productivity improvements, revenue generation, and profit enhancement. While this may seem like a tall order, FSOs can achieve this outcome by leveraging technology and being more effective in creating offers that customers value. For many FSOs this also means seizing on trends like digitization, servitization, and Uberization.

Digital Transformation has been a hot topic and big buzz phrase especially in Field Service.  I think it is one of the most important topics for FSOs. Companies who do not embrace digital transformation will become laggards at best or irrelevant at worst. Digital transformation is how companies develop innovations that lead to a better customer experience, improved operating efficiency, and increased financial value (e.g., revenue, profits, earnings, etc.) in the marketplace.   Digital transformation is what makes servitization and Uberization possible.

Many in our industry talk about IoT but the question is how does it fit into a successful FSO. As with many disruptive technologies, a small segment of field service is far along the adoption curve, while the majority is either in the early stage of adoption or just now beginning to consider it. At issue, IoT adoption in field service is a function of market penetration in the product/technology market. Adoption is the highest among large, Fortune 1000 companies and innovative start-ups in industrial automation, building automation, and home automation because these are the companies who are the furthest along in terms of integrating IoT into their product solution sets.

Many FSOs think that IoT is the answer to all their problems. They think it will solve all their labor, cost, quality, and revenue generation challenges. They need to understand that a great deal of planning is required to effectively roll-out IoT solutions. FSOs need to develop a vision, strategy, business plan, and road map that considers when, where, why, and how IoT will be implemented. They must consider which technology platform to use, what type of applications and analytics will be performed, what problems it will solve, and how to price and package it.

I have been talking and writing about Augmented Reality and Artificial Intelligence a lot because I feel that these technologies are a perfect fit for the field service space. I first became aware of them over twenty years ago and have patiently awaited their maturity and commercialization. I am bullish on them because they solve very real problems that FSOs face like labor shortage, first time fix challenges, requirements to reduce costs while improving productivity, etc. They also enable new possibilities. For example, the ability to anticipate, resolve, or avoid service events. I also like the fact they permit the creation of new income streams for service providers.

Other important trends that Field Service leaders should watch would be service marketing and sales, cognitive and predictive analytics, 3D printing, and drones. There are of course many more including the use of block chain technology which lies out on the horizon.

Stay up to date and catch more of my insights by visiting Field Service Insights, a subscription-based, community site bringing you thought provoking perspectives on industry trends and best practices.

Preparing for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Antonia Kay gives a preview of WBR's upcoming event in St. Louis

Worldwide Business Research (WBR) will be hosting the Connected Manufacturing Forum on June 19-20, 2018 in St Louis, MO. I recently had the chance to talk to Antonia Kay, the Program Director, about a few emerging trends impacting the Manufacturing Industry.

1. What are the biggest challenges facing the Manufacturing Industry today, specifically when it comes to Industry 4.0?

We are at the beginning of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which will fundamentally change our lives. Things that we deemed impossible or futuristic as children – artificial intelligence, human-like robots, drones, self-driving cars – are quickly becoming an everyday reality. As fascinating as it may sound, these technological advancements translate into a lot of uncertainty and hard work for industrial leaders tasked with “giving a facelift” to their manufacturing ecosystems.

The biggest challenge most executives are facing today is mapping out their digitalization journey, making first steps towards connectivity and automation, and adapting their company culture to the drastic change that comes with the digital transformation. As of today, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to connected manufacturing, but top global industrials are investing in IoT, cloud computing, advanced analytics, robotic process automation, and 3D printing in order to capture opportunities early on and secure their competitive edge in future.

2. What do you see as the most important trends and opportunities with respect to Industry 4.0?

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is the word of the day.

Global manufacturing organizations are investing in predictive maintenance and condition monitoring – the move from don’t fix what’s not broken to making sure things don’t break through continuous, smart monitoring and maintenance of the factory equipment.

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are big too, as they can drive equipment optimization and productivity on the factory floor and beyond.

And, of course, there is an ever-present talk about Big Data and advanced analytics – how do you collect and secure your data assets, how do you leverage it for informed decision making, product/service innovation and, eventually, improved customer satisfaction?

The opportunities that come with connecting people, processes, and assets are endless. The question is, how do you do it?

3. What is the Connected Manufacturing Forum and why should people attend?

Connected Manufacturing Forum is a networking and learning platform for Industry 4.0 frontrunners who are ready to move past fear of the unknown and revolutionize their business, one step at a time.

4. Can you give an overview of what people will get?

Connected Manufacturing Forum will offer a comprehensive coverage of the main Industry 4.0 trends and will help manufacturing leaders find answers to their toughest digitalization questions.

We have a good number of real-life case studies focused on Industry 4.0 blueprint development and implementation, projects that have helped companies like Johnson & Johnson, LEGO, Intel, Boeing, Coca-Cola and more start their connected manufacturing transformation, align teams around the same goals and prepare for future industry advancements.

Cultural change and workforce management is a big topic this year – executive leaders from Georg Fischer, Kuhn Krause, Subaru, Nature’s Variety will share best practices in preparing your organization for the Industry 4.0 revolution, delivering required training to your existing employees and expanding your talent pool by attracting new, highly skilled workers who will drive the future of your company.

Lastly, we will be discussing innovative technologies – IoT, augmented reality (AR), 3D printing, robotics, sensor technologies, human machine interface (HMI), predictive analytics – that can help companies improve processes and optimize efficiencies.

5. Why did WBR choose to produce the event, and how will it be different from other events focused on Industry 4.0?

Our in-depth market research indicated that there was a high need for an Industry 4.0 conference that would help industry leaders benchmark their connected manufacturing strategies and find solutions to the toughest digitalization challenges.

While there are many smart manufacturing events out there, the quality of our content and the seniority and experience of our topnotch speakers by far outweigh competition and what other events have to offer. Our program was developed through in-depth interviews with Fortune 500 executive leaders and is packed with case studies, panels, roundtable discussions, and interactive workshops focused on real-life challenges that manufacturing executives are trying to overcome on a daily basis. Our goal is to help them do just that and progress to the next digitalization level.

6. What will people be missing if they do not attend?

They’ll miss out on top-quality, real-life content and outstanding industry networking opportunities. If your company is going through a digital transformation, you simply can’t miss Connected Manufacturing Forum!

7. If they must come up with one reason why to attend, what should it be?

Connected Manufacturing Forum is your one stop shop for all things Industry 4.0. Have questions about digitalization? Don’t know how to roll out an IoT initiative and deliver on it? Want to learn from the best in the industry and meet the most innovative solution providers? Then hurry up and register today!

Register to join 150+ executives in a collaborative debate on the emerging Industry 4.0 trends in Manufacturing, Technology, Operations, and Advanced Engineering.

And as a bonus to my readers, use code CM18BLUMBERG to save 25% on your ticket!

REGISTER NOW

Walk Before You Can Run

A Blue Print for Creating an IoT Enabled Field Service Organization

Despite the enormous benefits of IoT, field service leaders face many challenges to implementing IoT platforms.   First, many of these leaders have not defined a clear outcome for IoT projects.   In other words, they haven’t created solid use case or achieved clarity around what types of actions, decisions, or benefits they can obtain from IoT.  The possibilities are endless and often overwhelming.   Second, these leaders need to create a clear road map with respect to when, how, and where they will implement IoT.  Questions often exist as to whether they should implement IoT on their existing installed base or roll-out with new product releases.   Applying IoT to an existing installed base may seem like a time-consuming and arduous task.  However, the benefits that a FSO can achieve when a large segment of their installed base is IoT enabled is significant.  Third, IoT produces a vast volume of data.  FSOs are often not sure how they will make sense of all the data or how they will ensure that actionable and measurable results will be achieved from this information.   Fourth and most importantly, many field service leaders are concerned that they must overhaul their entire service delivery processes prior to taking advantage of IoT.  This seems like an impossible order when they may have millions of dollars invested in the current ways of doing things.

Implementing IoT does not have to be this challenging or complex.  Ultimately, field service leaders desire a solution that helps them achieve actionable and measurable results in a reasonable time frame.  More importantly, they want a solution that does not bog them down with tons and tons of meaningless data and one that enables them to work with their existing service delivery processes and systems infrastructure.

Quite often, corporations that implement IoT solutions do so within the context of a Digital Transformation (DX) initiatives.  These initiatives typically involve a complete re-design of the service model.  While they have positive impact on the customer experience and share-holder value in the long run, they maybe counter-productive to the near term objectives of field service leaders to support their customers’ installed base on an efficient and productive basis.  This is because DX initiatives require corporate buy-in, multi function coordination, dedicated investment capital, and considerable time to implement, whereas field service leaders are more pragmatic and want results now.

The best approach for field service leaders is one that enables them to implement IoT in parallel to larger, corporate DX initiatives. By doing so, FSOs can realize short term gains within the context of serving their current installed base using the FSO’s existing infrastructure and service business model.  This approach reduces the requirement to re-design the entire business model and postpone the realization of results that are possible through IoT.

Field service leaders can think of this transformation as “a walk before you run” approach to implementing IoT.  It requires field service leaders to think of IoT in terms of moving from a reactive service model, to conditional, to prescriptive and finally to a predictive service model.  Reactive service is the modus operandi of most of today’s FSOs.  Service is provided when the customer acknowledges they have a problem and request a solution.  Conditional service represents the next phase in the transition to IoT.  It uses IoT technology to monitor the customers’ installed base and provide alerts to the FSO that service is required. This enables the FSO to be more responsive to customer issues, ensure first time fix, and minimize downtime.  A prescriptive model is one in which the alert includes a recommendation or instruction about what action the FSO should take next.  Predictive service goes one step further. It monitors the customer’s installed base to anticipate service events and take corrective action before they occur thus avoiding downtime altogether and eliminate operating costs and overhead from the service operation.

The time for FSOs to think about implementing IoT is when they are replacing or upgrading their Field Service Management Software.  Perhaps the requirement for IoT alone is the primary reason why a FSO would want to upgrade or replace now.  Assuming this is the case, FSOs are advised to seek out software vendors who offer IoT feature functionality as part of a complete solution. This will minimize the number of moving parts (e.g., vendors, applications) that need to be included in the solution.  This in turn will lead to reduced implementation costs, an efficient process, and less headaches for the FSO.  In addition, it will ensure that the IoT solution works within the context of existing service delivery processes and procedures as opposed to the other way around.  In this way, FSOs can walk before they run.

 

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IoT’s surprising impact on revolutionizing inventory management

Sarah Hatfield directs OnProcess Technology’s strategy for products and core service offerings, including the OPTvision platform. She brings more than 15 years of leadership expertise from previous roles in supply chain, product and program management for Comcast, Asurion and ADT.

You know disruptive technologies have reached the tipping point when non-IT pros build business plans around them. This is exactly what’s happening with IoT. Because of its ability to drive wide-ranging, game-changing improvements, IoT is starting to be used across all aspects of business operations. One of the newest, and most impactful, areas is spare parts inventory management, a key aspect of the post-sale supply chain.

Maintaining the right level of spare parts is critical. As you can probably guess, carrying excessive inventory can be prohibitively expensive. But if you have too little, you’ll slow product repairs, hurt customer experience and end up spending more money purchasing new parts for stock replenishment. The problem is, traditional best practices for managing spare parts — using time-series algorithms combined with sales forecasting, seasonality, gut instincts and simple rules of thumb to determine how many parts to stock — are woefully inaccurate because:

  • They’re static, “review-and-stock” endeavors based largely on historical demand data
  • The algorithms don’t account for variables resulting from failed parts in the field

Knowing this, many companies hedge their bets by purposefully overstocking. Others think they’re maintaining the right levels, but unknowingly overstock. In either case, they’re wasting a lot of money.

New IoT-driven inventory planning

The key to accurately stocking parts is knowing which ones are likely to fail and when they’ll need to be replaced. Some businesses have attempted to use IoT data to understand product failure impacts on inventory planning. However, most of the IoT monitoring programs are designed to respond to signal failures. Plus, IoT data collection is often haphazard and emphasizes the few pieces of equipment that are starting to fail, rather than the whole. This makes it impossible to generate a sound baseline for analyzing product performance and predicting failures — which, in turn, makes it impossible to accurately forecast spare parts needs.

The good news is there’s a new inventory planning algorithm that builds IoT-based failure data directly into the equation. Developed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Transportation and Logistics, it enables businesses to accurately forecast needs. By using this methodology and analyzing historical failure data on the entire installed base, businesses can predict the exact spare parts they’re likely to need, when and in what quantity.

The better news is that it doesn’t take a huge team to capture IoT data because not much data is needed…. Read More