Walk Before You Can Run

A Blue Print for Creating an IoT Enabled Field Service Organization

Despite the enormous benefits of IoT, field service leaders face many challenges to implementing IoT platforms.   First, many of these leaders have not defined a clear outcome for IoT projects.   In other words, they haven’t created solid use case or achieved clarity around what types of actions, decisions, or benefits they can obtain from IoT.  The possibilities are endless and often overwhelming.   Second, these leaders need to create a clear road map with respect to when, how, and where they will implement IoT.  Questions often exist as to whether they should implement IoT on their existing installed base or roll-out with new product releases.   Applying IoT to an existing installed base may seem like a time-consuming and arduous task.  However, the benefits that a FSO can achieve when a large segment of their installed base is IoT enabled is significant.  Third, IoT produces a vast volume of data.  FSOs are often not sure how they will make sense of all the data or how they will ensure that actionable and measurable results will be achieved from this information.   Fourth and most importantly, many field service leaders are concerned that they must overhaul their entire service delivery processes prior to taking advantage of IoT.  This seems like an impossible order when they may have millions of dollars invested in the current ways of doing things.

Implementing IoT does not have to be this challenging or complex.  Ultimately, field service leaders desire a solution that helps them achieve actionable and measurable results in a reasonable time frame.  More importantly, they want a solution that does not bog them down with tons and tons of meaningless data and one that enables them to work with their existing service delivery processes and systems infrastructure.

Quite often, corporations that implement IoT solutions do so within the context of a Digital Transformation (DX) initiatives.  These initiatives typically involve a complete re-design of the service model.  While they have positive impact on the customer experience and share-holder value in the long run, they maybe counter-productive to the near term objectives of field service leaders to support their customers’ installed base on an efficient and productive basis.  This is because DX initiatives require corporate buy-in, multi function coordination, dedicated investment capital, and considerable time to implement, whereas field service leaders are more pragmatic and want results now.

The best approach for field service leaders is one that enables them to implement IoT in parallel to larger, corporate DX initiatives. By doing so, FSOs can realize short term gains within the context of serving their current installed base using the FSO’s existing infrastructure and service business model.  This approach reduces the requirement to re-design the entire business model and postpone the realization of results that are possible through IoT.

Field service leaders can think of this transformation as “a walk before you run” approach to implementing IoT.  It requires field service leaders to think of IoT in terms of moving from a reactive service model, to conditional, to prescriptive and finally to a predictive service model.  Reactive service is the modus operandi of most of today’s FSOs.  Service is provided when the customer acknowledges they have a problem and request a solution.  Conditional service represents the next phase in the transition to IoT.  It uses IoT technology to monitor the customers’ installed base and provide alerts to the FSO that service is required. This enables the FSO to be more responsive to customer issues, ensure first time fix, and minimize downtime.  A prescriptive model is one in which the alert includes a recommendation or instruction about what action the FSO should take next.  Predictive service goes one step further. It monitors the customer’s installed base to anticipate service events and take corrective action before they occur thus avoiding downtime altogether and eliminate operating costs and overhead from the service operation.

The time for FSOs to think about implementing IoT is when they are replacing or upgrading their Field Service Management Software.  Perhaps the requirement for IoT alone is the primary reason why a FSO would want to upgrade or replace now.  Assuming this is the case, FSOs are advised to seek out software vendors who offer IoT feature functionality as part of a complete solution. This will minimize the number of moving parts (e.g., vendors, applications) that need to be included in the solution.  This in turn will lead to reduced implementation costs, an efficient process, and less headaches for the FSO.  In addition, it will ensure that the IoT solution works within the context of existing service delivery processes and procedures as opposed to the other way around.  In this way, FSOs can walk before they run.

 

Schedule a FREE 30 minute consultation

What Makes Successful Digital Transformation? – Podcast

Field Service — FMS

Michael Blumberg (President & CEO of Blumberg Advisory Group) sat down with Todd Stewart of In the Know to discuss why digital transformation is one of the hottest topics within the field service space. 

Digital Transformation occurs when an organization leverages the use of  advanced technology to change the way they conducting business. By doing so, these companies can run a  more responsive business operation and gain greater market share.

This is especially true in the Field Service Industry. One example of this positive impact is the use of Internet of Things (IoT) to remotely monitor equipment performance. By continuously monitoring sensors related to a particular piece of machinery, a Field Service Organization(FSO) can predict when service is needed or know as soon as there is a failure. At that point, the FSO can contact the customer to provide information to fix the problem, analyze what personnel or parts need to be sent onsite to resolve the issue, or provide information to the customer to avoid the impending problem all together.

Learn more about Digital Transformation by listening to this podcast.

 

 

Digital Transformation Trend: Changing “Business as Usual”

The following is an excerpt from an article we wrote for XM Reality.  You can get a copy of the full article here http://resources.xmreality.com/blumberg-new-reality/

customer service

Perhaps the trend that is having the greatest influence on the adoption of AR/VR/MR platforms is not the affordability or stability of the technology but the commitment by today’s leading corporations to embrace Digital Transformation (DX). Rather than utilizing technologies simply to streamline and automate existing business processes and transactions, digital transformation means utilizing technological innovation such AR/VR/MR to change the very way business is conducted, resulting in new business models and cultures.

DX has had an overwhelmingly positive impact on the performance of companies that have pursued this strategy. In fact, in some instances it has resulted in a winner take all scenario. According to Constellation Research Founder and Principal Analyst Ray Wang, “digital leaders in almost every industry are taking 40% to 70% of the overall market share and 23% to 57% of profits. In some markets, if there are one or two major players, they are taking up to 77% of the profits”.

These findings suggest that DX could lead to a “zero-sum” game for selected field service providers. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that businesses across a wide range of industry segments are investing heavily in DX technologies. Indeed, worldwide spending on DX is estimated to approach $1.2 trillion by 2017 year-end, according to International Data Corporation, an increase of 17.8% over 2016. IDC predicts this market will continue to grow at a steady rate of 17.9% over the next three years, reaching $2.0 trillion by 2020.

Most business experts and industry pundits agree that DX investments have the greatest impact on a company’s performance when they achieve two major objectives. First, they make business operations more responsive by leveraging digitally connected product-service offerings, people, and assets. Second, they lead to innovations that transform how customers, partners, employees, and things communicate with each other. For field service organizations, the outcome of meeting these objectives incudes a more enabled workforce, enhanced customer experience, and improved overall collaboration and performance.

Clearly, AR/VR/MR technology is well suited to meet these objectives and deliver outcomes. At a macro level, it changes the way field service business is conducted, by bringing a problem to the expert rather than the other way around. As a result, it shortens the time it takes to resolve a customer’s issue and avoids the high costs associated with sending a technician to the customer site. In addition, it helps FSOs overcome resource constraints. For example, utilizing this technology, a technician at a customer site can simultaneously offer remote support to a second customer at another location. Furthermore, the technology facilitates greater collaboration and performance among technicians. A “top-gun” technician with deep domain knowledge and expertise can provide remote guidance to a less experienced, “novice” engineer. Technicians can also use annotations as part of AR sessions to overcome language barriers that may exist between people in different geographic regions. Lastly, AR/VR/MR provides an immersive experience to the customer, enhancing their experience and enabling them to be self-reliant when it comes to resolving basic issues.

In many ways, AR/VR/MR pushes the boundaries of possibilities when it comes to providing high quality and efficient services and support to end customers. By overcoming limitations, FSOs experience improved performance in the areas of first time fix, remote call resolution rates, mean time to repair, and cost per service call. While effective field service leaders have always been committed to continuously improving performance in these areas, AR/VR/MR provides the technology to make step-wise (e.g., exponential) improvements as opposed to only incremental gains.

AR/VR/MR brings additional value in its ability to positively influence and enhance customer satisfaction as well as generate new and profitable sources of revenue for FSOs. For example, many early FSO adopters have been able to monetize their investment in this technology by offering AR/VR/MR enabled remote support sessions as a value-added, fee-based service to customers. These examples clearly demonstrate why FSOs should give serious consideration to deploying an AR/VR/MR solution today.

Call Michael for a FREE 30 minute Consultation