Extended Warranty/Extended Service Best Practices

Attachment Rates and Renewal Rates

Recently, Blumberg Advisory Group and Giuntini and Company conducted a study about the Extended Warranty/Extended Service Market.  We looked at various aspects of sales process and specifically evaluated the Warranty Attachment rate (i.e., customers signing up for these programs) and Renewal rate (i.e., customers renewing their agreement during the warranty or at the end of the term)  as they are Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that measure how successful a company is in marketing and selling extended warranties and extended service programs. Best in class performance would equate to companies achieving an attachment rate of 50% or higher and renewal rates of 75% or better.

We saw that only a small percentage of companies have been able to achieve these targets. Specifically, the survey results indicate that only 30% of companies have achieved attachment rates of 50% or more. In fact, 16.7% have achieved attachment rates of 70% or better. While the majority (59.5%) of companies experience renewal rates of 75% or more, only 22.5% have achieved renewal rates greater than 90%.

For companies who wish to improve their performance, there are several best practices that they can pursue to achieve best in class performance on KPIs related to marketing and selling extended warranties and extended service programs. Most significantly, service portfolio design plays a critical role in influencing attachment and renewal rates. The truth is that customers will purchase these programs if they see value, i.e., feel that they will effectively meet their needs. That’s’ why it is important to specify what’s included in the program from the perspective of features, resources, and coverage.

It is important to include both basic and value-added services as part of the program. The more extensive and focused the services, the more likely the customers will be to buy. Nearly all the companies surveyed (93.2%) provide basic corrective failure as part of their program. Only 50.4% include preventative maintenance. Less than 40% offer a broader array of value added services such as calibration, inspection, recalls, and disaster recovery as part of the portfolio.

Indicating the level of service commitment, the customer can expect to receive is also important when it comes to selling extended warranty and extended service programs. Only 58.1% of companies have defined onsite response times as part of their programs, 39.3% specify parts delivery times, 29.9% and 31.6% respectively commit to the repair time and remote resolution times, and 15.0% will provide a loaner unit if repair time target is not met. These components to the program provide added value to the customers as it offers a guarantee as to when the service will be delivered. With respect to selling extended warranty programs, almost half (49%) of respondents indicate that they sell extended warranty and extended service programs any time after the original product sale.  Making this option available at any time naturally increases sales of the programs which equates to higher attachment rates.

The way in which these programs are promoted can also impacts KPIs. Most companies surveyed rely on direct mail (74.8%) and brochures (68.0%) to sell extended warranty and extended service programs. Most respondents (58.5%) indicate that direct sales have been very effective when it comes to impacting attachment rates while only 26.6% believe that brochures are as effective. Interestingly, survey respondents agree that other tactics are just as effective. For example, 50% of respondents indicate that endorsements and testimonials are very effective as is reputation management (49.1%), telemarketing (32.0%) and public relations (28.9%).

Frequency of communication is also a critical driver when it comes to influencing attachment and renewal rates. Almost half (49%) of respondents indicate that they sell extended warranty and extended service programs any time after the original product sale which means the can capture revenue at any point in time during the product’s lifecycle.

Only 28.0% notify customers 90 days or more in advance of when their programs are up for renewal and 36.0% provide more than 3 notifications that there contracts are about to expire. More importantly, most (60%) respondents upsell their programs during the warranty entitlement process. Reminding customers of the opportunity to renew or extend their agreement provides results.

In summary, the survey findings suggest that best in class companies follow a structured and disciplined approach to marketing and selling extended warranties and service programs. They do not view sales of these programs as a one-time event to be made only at the product point of sale. Indeed, they sell beyond the original point of purchase and align attachment and renewals with the customer entitlement process. Furthermore, they promote their programs through a wide array of marketing communications tactics and rely on frequent and timely communication to get their message across. Most importantly, they ensure their programs are designed to meet the needs of their customer and are very specific about what the customer can expect to receive in terms of service feature, resources, and coverage.

Do you have a success story with marketing or selling Extended Warranty/Service programs? Share it with us and be part of the conversation.

What is Field Service Management and Why Should You Care?

This week’s post were are pleased to share a mini info-graphic based on an article by Danny Wong from Salesforce.com. You can find the companion article here.


What is Field Service Management and Why Should You Care Infographic

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Measuring the Impact of Freelance Management Systems on KPIs

In a previous blog we presented the results of a survey regarding staffing for the Field Service Industry.  The  respondents of the survey included people who either staff or make decisions about staffing for companies ranging in size based on revenue, number of events staffed, types of technology supported, and the way in which the service business was run (i.e., cost center, profit center, etc).  The survey supported our idea that using a Variable Workforce and especially using a Freelance Management System (FMS) to recruit, hire and dispatch the Field Service Engineers (FSEs) is becoming a larger part of the industry with overwhelmingly positive results.

As in all industries, there are certain ways in which we measure success, so we looked at the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that are relevant in the Field Service Industry.  These included indices like  Service Level Agreement (SLA) compliance, Field Service Engineer (FSE) Utilization Rate, FSE Productivity , First Time Fix Rate, Time to first response, Gross Margin per Field Service project and per service call Time to recruit, hire, train and onboard, FSEs, Time to train FSEs, and others for the Field Service Industry.

On all 17 KPIs measured, at least 28% of companies saw an improvement with the greatest improvement noted in Geographic Reach (76%). And over 75% saw either improvement or least no change in all indices. Variable Workforce managed by FMS enables easier ability to recruit, hire and onboard specially trained Field Service Engineers. This also increases the ability to respond to seasonal and emergency needs of customers.

The survey shows that using a variable workforce model is faster, less expensive and more efficient than not using it. Because it is so efficient, this makes integration and utilization of FSEs faster. In addition, users of Variable Workforce and FMS are able to support more types of technology (4.3 vs 2.8). This means that not only is the overall function of the company improved, the use of FMS allows companies an opportunity for growth.

We also compared the results of several KPIs for companies using FMS to the Best in Class (BIC) Performance, which is an average of the top 5% of respondents for each KPI.  The results were quite encouraging:  Best In Class FMS users had an SLA Compliance Rate of 98.2%  vs 81.1% for the overall average; FSE Utilization Rate of 96% vs 94.5%; and First Time Rix Rate of 96% vs 77.8%.  In addition, FSE Productivity was the same among Best In Class FMS user versus non FMS users at 6 calls per day.

Not everyone who responded to the survey is has moved to using a Variable Workforce.  In fact, about a 25% of the survey participants are not Variable Workforce users.  What were their main concerns about making the transition?  Loss of control over service quality, coupled with concern about the reliability and capability of freelance technicians.  About a third of this group felt that their volume of service calls doesn’t justify switching to a Variable Workforce model. And 10% stated “We’ve always used a traditional workforce and will not change.”

Other than those who just are not willing to change, the reasons given by these companies for not changing were similar to those concerns expressed by many prior to making the jump to Variable Workforce.  As the survey results show, not only have the Variable Workforce adopters found that their business improved, but they also said that they will continue to use this model and increase the use of it as well.  The success of changing their staffing model seems to far outweigh their past concerns.

So are you are using a Variable Workforce? If not, what is holding you back?  Are you using a Variable Workforce but not using FMS to manage it?  This survey shows that the use of a Variable Workforce in conjunction with a FMS platform has provided overwhelming success for those who have made the transition.  Use of the Variable Workforce and FMS is growing and will continue to do so. It is helping companies to move into the changing market place while maintaining high quality standards.  Meeting and exceeding the needs of your customers, being agile and able to expand your geographic reach and service offerings and financial benefits mean that Variable Workforce and Freelance Management Systems are the way to go into the future in the Field Service Industry.

Best Practices In Selling Extended Warranty

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Innovation is a Given

This is a reprint of an interview which appeared on Core Systems’ website in their Field Service Management Blog.  Core Systems develops solutions and software for the Field Service Industry.

In this week’s interview we have spoken to Michael R. Blumberg, independent consultant and President of Blumberg Advisory Group, about the latest technologies field service businesses need to implement and what managers can do to create a culture of innovation.

You are consulting a lot of companies on strategic planning and efficiency improvement. What are your customers’ pain points?

I help my customers unlock value within their service supply chain like for example technical support, field services, services parts logistics or depot repair. For example, they may face challenges growing top line revenue or boosting profits. They may be trying to improve various KPIs associated with service quality and productivity. Others are focused on reducing costs, improving operating efficiency, or enhancing customer experience. One specific set of challenges I help clients deal with is validating their need to implement new technology to automated key business processes and functions.

What do you advise those companies to meet those challenges? 

I help them compare their current business processes and performance to best practices and industry standards. As part of this evaluation, I help them understand where there are gaps and how they can close them through process and systems improvements. I then make specific recommendations on what the new processes and systems should look like.

According to you, what are the top technologies that will change how businesses deliver service in the future? 

Every management guru and industry analyst wants to point to disruptive technologies like IoT, wearables, drones, and 3D printing as the top technologies that will change how service will be delivered in the future. No doubt these technologies will have a dramatic impact on the future of service. However, in order for these technologies to have any real and measurable benefit, they need to be incorporated into a company’s overall service business strategy, service delivery processes, and systems infrastructure.

More importantly, it may be a long time in the future until a company is ready and able to make these investments. In the meantime, there is lower hanging fruit they can pick off the trees that will help them achieve measurable gains in service performance, in a shorter period of time. For example, technologies like social collaboration, mobility, cloud computing, crowdsourcing platforms, or knowledge management. Businesses should consider implementing these technologies, if they haven’t done so already.

Do you have particular examples of companies that have innovated their field service? What results do they see? 

Most examples usually center on implementing some form of field service software. Either a basic system with dispatch, depot repair, and inventory management functionality or more advanced systems with capabilities for dynamic scheduling, spare parts optimization, field service mobility, and knowledge management. The results include greater control over people and parts, improved access to real-time business intelligence, better decision making, lower operating costs, improved utilization of parts and labor, and increased productivity of field resources.

Which features should a field service software ideally have? 

Businesses seeking to implement a field service software solution should consider features which automate critical service delivery processes and capture key data related to service transactions. In addition, the software should have the capability to produce performance reports in order to evaluate how well the processes are working. At a minimum, field service software should include feature functionality for work order management, parts usage, customer history, equipment history, time and cost tracking, and reporting & metrics. More advanced features might include mobility, contract management, and dynamic scheduling, routing, and knowledge management.

Do you feel there is a fear on the side of businesses to implement new technologies? Or are they open to innovation? 

I think most field service leaders today recognize that their businesses need to innovate in order to survive and thrive. Without innovation, they risk going out of business. This was not always the perspective of service businesses. Looking back, 15 or 20 years ago, there were more field service leaders who resisted innovation than embraced it. Technology was often perceived to be a threat to their existence. Now most field service leaders see innovation as a given. Sure business executives still have fears about innovation, its human nature. However, the fears are more realistic then in the past. Rather than an irrational fear about being replaced by a machine, the fear is centered around whether or not their companies are ready for innovation, whether the implementation will go smoothly, and whether the results will live up to the promise.

What would you advise managers to do in terms of getting everyone on board with innovating service processes? 

Managers really need to make sure that everyone understands and appreciates where the business is in terms of current levels of productivity and efficiency. They need to communicate this with all stakeholders and help them understand the risks associated with maintaining the status quo versus the rewards associated with pursing innovation. In addition, managers must create a well-defined plan for innovation and communicate the plan with key stakeholders. Most importantly, managers must create an environment which motivates and rewards people for embracing innovation.

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Field Service Staffing — The Variable Workforce and FMS

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The unemployment rate, outsourcing, part time employees, changes in the workforce; these are all topics that have been in the news for several years. Is it just that there are less jobs or fewer full time positions? Is the economy really in bad shape? Or is there a staffing trend that we need to examine.  Full time employment means a guarantee of wages, benefits, and paying the employee even when there is a lull in the business.  For companies in the Field Service Industry there may be peaks and valleys in workflow and need for field service personnel. And while so many functions can be performed on a remote basis, sometimes someone just has to be there.

Enter the Variable Workforce, offering highly skilled, well trained, specialized Field Service Engineers who are available on an as needed or project basis. These individuals are normally highly motivated as they essentially run their own small business and best of all; they work this way by choice.

Now we have people to hire.  How do we manage that? Freelance Management Systems (FMS) offer online cloud based systems allowing companies looking for qualified workers, including Field Service Engineers, to find them quickly and easily.  FMS provides companies with the opportunity to achieve significant cost savings over time and the ability to accelerate strategic or organic expansion resulting in new clients, new service offerings, and/or new sales territories.

So what is the actual experience of companies using a Variable Workforce and FMS platforms? Have they been able to achieve these benefits or is it just hype?

A survey seemed to me to be the best way to get answers. So we designed an online survey for the Field Service Industry to ask professionals who handle field service staffing or make decisions about field service staffing requirements, for companies with field service functions for technology equipment they sell and/or service.

We wanted to examine the benefits of Variable Workforce models, particularly FMS. In doing so, we could assess concerns regarding using FMS, the motivators for using FMS and the benefits that have been seen by using it.

Over 200 Third Party Maintainers (TPM)/ Independent Service Organizations (ISO), Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM), Value Added Resellers, Systems Integrators, and Self-Maintainers participated.  The companies range in size from over $500 million in annual revenue to less than $50 million varying in size from those who manage less than 100 field service events per month up to more than 1000. These field service events included emergencies, installations, inspections, and preventative maintenance or calibration. And the types of technology supported included Information Technology, Network Connectivity, Printers, Point of Sale, Telecommunications, and more. The companies also varied on how a Field Service Business is run – as a cost center, profit center, strategic line of business, or revenue contribution center.

Over three-fourths (77%) were currently using some type of Variable Workforce Model.  The survey respondents were two-thirds TPM/ISOs or OEMs.

Most participants (81%) use the Variable Workforce for project based work.

We found that the top three reasons that companies made the move to a Variable Workforce were:

  • The ability to be agile and scale the workforce based on customer demands.
  • Over half agreed that “We didn’t have enough work in selected geographies to justify hiring a fulltime Field Service Engineer.”
  • Almost all said that controlling labor costs was a significant motivator.

One of the most important results was that the Variable Workforce users support more types of technology on average than non-users.  That is, those companies who use Variable Workforce are able to support 4 types of technology versus only 1.8 types of technology for non-users.

Nearly two-thirds of those utilizing the Variable Workforce use a Freelance Management System (FMS) to manage the staffing.  Of these FMS users, almost all have been using it for at least one year and 60% for three years or more — another sign that something must be working.

FMS users tend to support more types of technology as well. On average, companies who use FMS support 4.3 types of technology versus only 2.8 types for non-users.

Ultimately the most compelling reason to make the switch was that the FMS platform is agile, giving companies the ability to scale up quickly to meet seasonal, cyclical and short term demands. In fact, 71% of users found this to be the case.  FMS adopters have been able to gain more business and have been able to increase their field service work. They have experienced such success that 76% of them reported an increased demand for FMS just in this past year, most by at least 15%.

The survey results certainly indicate that usage of Freelance Management Systems for the Variable Workforce in Field Service will continue to increase over the next year as well.

Stay tuned for future posts where I will discuss what our survey revealed about the Key Performance Indicators and how use of Variable Workforce and specifically FMS impacts the Field Service Industry.

The New Field Service Workforce

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There has been a dramatic shift over the past 5 to 10 years in the way work is performed in the U.S. and Europe as more and more workers join the gig economy.  By definition, a gig economy is an environment where temporary positions are common and organizations contract with independent workers for short-term engagements.  In other words, people are increasingly taking on freelance work.

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, 53 million Americans are currently working as freelancers.  By 2020, 50% of the American workforce will be engaged in freelance activity. Furthermore, a study published by the Freelancers Union and Elance O-Desk indicates that freelance work contributes $750 billion annually to the US economy.

The gig economy has played a significant role within the Field Service Industry.  It is driven by the trend of many companies to implement variable workforce (VWF) models. This is a business model in which a field service organization (FSO) relies on a contingent workforce to manage peaks and valleys in labor demand.  Earlier this year, Blumberg Advisory conducted an extensive research study to examine the impact of VWF models on the Field Service Industry. The study, sponsored by Field Nation, revealed  that 8 out of 10 FSOs have implemented VWF models to manage over one-half (53%) of their workforces.

One of the ways that FSOs implement the VWF model is through a Freelancer Management System (FMS).  This is an integrated software platform that includes functionality for Vendor Management System (VMS), Human Capital Management System (HCMS), Service Ticketing System, on-line recruitment tools, and reporting & analytics. Approximately two-thirds of survey respondents use this type of solution to manage their contingent labor pool of field technicians.

The single biggest benefit of using an FMS, as reported by 70% of survey respondents, is scalability.  In other words, the ability to scale the workforce up or down based on service demands.   A majority of respondents also perceive access to a vibrant marketplace of freelance technicians (61%), the flexibility that an FMS has in managing W2 and 1099 employees (56%), and lower cost of overhead (54%) that results from using an FMS, among the top benefits.  Just under half of the respondents (46%) viewed lower direct labor cost as a benefit of using an FMS platform.

In addition to these benefits, FMS platforms have a measurable impact on field service financial and operating performance.  Indeed, companies that use FMS platforms report having observed a 6% or more improvement in field service key performance indicators (KPIs) such as field service productivity (i.e., # of visits per day), labor utilization rates, SLA compliance, recurring revenue, and gross margins.

Obviously, the gig economy has had a positive impact on FSOs who rely on the VWF model and FMS platforms.  However, many opponents of the gig economy believe that freelancing models take advantage of workers and therefore are bad for individuals.  The facts point to the contrary. In 2015, Field Nation, a leading FMS platform provider to the field service industry, conducted a survey among freelance workers to understand their attitudes and perceptions of freelance work.  An overwhelming majority indicated that the freelance lifestyle is both a personnel choice (88%) and their primary source of income (73%).  Almost all the respondents were satisfied with the work they do (97%) and the career choice they had made (95%).

These findings suggest that the nature of work within the Field Service Industry has changed for good. The days of individual commitment to a single employer and vice versa are long gone.  Freelancing is not a passing fad within Field Service .  Furthermore, Freelancer Management System (FMS) platforms make it possible for FSOs to achieve positive, measurable results from implementing a Variable Workforce Model. Clearly, the gig economy is here to stay.

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What Do Pokémon Go and Service Lifecycle Management Have in Common?

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Augmented Reality (AR) became a physical reality earlier this month when Nintendo launched its Pokémon Go application. This is the first example of a consumer based, augmented reality application that can be downloaded free on any Android or iOS device.  According to Vox Examiner, “Pokémon Go is a game that uses your phone’s GPS and clock to detect where and when you are in the game and make Pokémon “appear” around you (on your phone screen) so you can go and catch them. As you move around, different and more types of Pokémon will appear depending on where you are and what time it is. The idea is to encourage you to travel around the real world to catch Pokémon in the game.”

Many analysts believed that consumer applications for AR would not hit the market until 2017.   Nintendo was ahead of schedule.  Pokémon is taking the world by storm and fueling the market for  AR applications, a market that Digi-Capital reports will reach $90 billion by 2020.  Goldman Sachs estimates that 60% of the AR market will be driven by consumer applications, with the remaining 40% of the market attributable to enterprise usage.

In case you have not been paying attending to technology trends, AR provides a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment and then augments (or supplements) this view with computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data.  The technology functions by enhancing one’s current perception of reality.  AR improves  users’ experience by enabling them to interact and learn from whatever they are observing.

Prior to the launch of Pokémon Go, AR applications where limited to the enterprise market.  I saw an example of a real-world-use case for AR at PTC’s LiveWorx ’16 last month in Boston.  At this conference and exhibition, PTC provided a proof of concept of how AR can be utilized within the context of Service Lifecycle Management.  In conjunction with their customer FlowServe, a leading manufacturer of pump and valves for process industries, PTC demonstrated an integrated solution which provides users with a better experience when it comes to operating, maintaining, and managing centrifugal pumps.  Sensors on the pump identify when an anomaly is detected.  Using AR, a virtual representation of the machine is placed on top of the device to expose the root cause of the problem.  AR is then utilized to identify the exact steps that need to be taken to resolve the problem.

By implementing AR solutions, companies can expect to realize significant improvements in key performance indicators related to Service Lifecycle Management.  For example, AR can help equipment operators anticipate and/or avoid machine failures and thus increase equipment uptime.  AR can also facilitate repair processes, thereby reducing both repair time and downtime while improving first time fix.  In addition, AR can improve the learning curve of novice field technicians, enabling them to become more proficient in diagnosing and resolving problems.  Furthermore, the contextual knowledge that is made available through AR enables equipment owners to make smarter decisions about operating the equipment, which  in turn can help extend the equipment’s life.

These results are only possible if field service technicians embrace AR and actively utilize it.  How likely are technicians to embrace this technology? This of course is the big question on people’s mind.  One scenario is that AR adoption will be very high, so high that technicians will become dependent on it.  The implication is that technicians will lose their domain expertise and be unable to resolve problems without it.  This could pose a challenge if for some reason the AR interface is not working properly and the machine still has a problem that requires resolution.  This outcome can be avoided through ongoing education, training, and skill-assessment drills.

A more likely scenario is that adoption rates will occur gradually.  Although technicians may embrace the use of AR in consumer applications, they may have some resistance to using it in a technical environment.  This is because AR requires technicians to modify their workflow and perceptions of themselves as problem solvers.  Technicians have been conditioned to rely on their own experience, intuition, and “tribal knowledge” to solve problems.  AR changes that basic premise.  Technicians will have to remember to activate AR applications when they are in the field and rely on the information that is presented to them to complete the task at hand. They’ll also need to become proficient at analyzing and acting upon the information they observe.  These activities are not second nature and may take some getting used to for veteran technicians because it represents a different way of working and a challenge to their conventional way of thinking.  Companies that want to leverage the value of AR can overcome these challenges by managing technicians’ performance against key performance indicators (KPIs).  They can observe who on their team is using AR and evaluate the impact on performance. They can in turn incentivize and reward good performance as well as identify who needs more training and coaching on the use of AR.

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Big Data & Analytics – A Transformational Journey

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Last month I had the good fortune to attend the Reverse Logistics Sustainability Council (RLSC) and Warranty Chain Management (WCM) conferences.   Big Data & Analytics was a topic that gained much prominence at both of these conferences.  Indeed, this is a subject that is gaining much attention in business and academic circles these days.  Interestingly, there is a general consensus among academics and industry thought leaders that Big Data Analytics is one of the most misunderstood and misused terms in the business world.  For some business professionals, the term analytics applies specifically to performance metrics, for others it has to do with unstructured data sets and data lakes, while still others think it relates to predicting the future.

Big Data refers to the volume, velocity, and variety of data that a company has at their disposal. Analytics applies to the discovery, interpretation, and communication of meaningful patterns in data.  The truth is that there are actually four (4) different types of Big Data Analytics that firms can rely on to make business decisions.

  • Descriptive Analytics: This type of Analytics answers the question “What is happening?”  In a field service organization (FSO) this may be as simple as KPIs like SLA compliance or First Time Fix rate.  The exact measurement tells an FSO how well it is doing when it comes to fixing problems right the first time and meeting customer obligations for response time.
  • Diagnostic Analytics: Understanding what is happening is important, but it is even more important to understand why something is happening.  This is how managers and executives can identify and resolve problems before they get out of hand. Diagnostic Analytics provides this level of insight, for example by pin-pointing why First Time Fix Rate is low.  Maybe it’s because the company is making poor decisions about which Field Engineers (FEs) are dispatched to the customers’ sites.  Or, perhaps selected Field Engineers do not have access to the right parts when they arrive on site and must return for a second visit.
  • Predictive Analytics: Ok, so now we know why something is happening. Wouldn’t it also be good to know what is likely to happen next?  Predictive Analytics provides this level of insight. In other words, it provides a forecast about what may happen if a company continues to experience a low first time fix rate.  For example, it could show the specific impact on customer satisfaction or the measurable effect on service costs and/or gross margins.   In this case, Predictive Analytics helps a company understand with a high level of statistical confidence how long it may continue to maintain the status quo before financial problems may arise.
  • Prescriptive Analytics: The final component of analytics is Prescriptive A This level of information helps a company understand at a granular level of certainty exactly what it should do to resolve a current situation and avoid future problems.  For example, Prescriptive Analytics may reveal that a company must ensure the field engineer has the right parts on hand prior to being dispatched to arriving at the customer site.  The Analytics can show which parts must be available and where they should be located.

In summary, Analytics takes the guesswork out of decision-making.  Instead of relying on intuition or prior experience, service executives can make sound business decisions based on objective analysis of data.  As a result, the probability of making the right decision increases.   Relying on Analytics to drive business decisions involves a transformational journey.  As innovative as it seems, a company cannot just start using Predictive or Prescriptive Analytics. It must first become proficient with Descriptive Analytics before it can leverage the power of more advanced analytic models.    This journey is not just about the data.  Many managers mistakenly believe that they must have enough of the right data to make Analytics work.  The truth is that we all have a wealth of data at our disposal.  Our challenge is finding the tools and technology to process the data, making Analytics a winning business proposition.  This begs the question: does your service organization have an optimal system in place to harness the power of Analytics?  If you are not certain, it may be time to conduct an audit and assessment of your infrastructure.  To learn more, schedule a free consultation today.

Strategic Value Drivers of High-Tech Service

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In order for a business to succeed it must have a clearly defined strategic value that it provides to shareholders, stakeholders (e.g., customers, suppliers, employees,) and the market place at large.  It is important to clearly define strategic value since it is the precursor to developing a value proposition and mission statement.  Furthermore, it forms the basis for the strategies, tactics, and programs that a business puts into place.

Nowhere is strategic value more important than in the High-Tech Service Industry.  All too often, service providers, especially those that are divisions of product companies (e.g., OEMs, VARs, Distributors) fail to clearly define their strategic value.  As a result, they fail to make any impact in reaching their business goals and objectives.   They are like a ship on an ocean without a sail, drifting aimlessly in whatever direction the winds blow.

We have found that there are at least three (3) common strategic values that High Tech  Service  & Support organization might chose to pursue/adopt. These include:

  1. Directly influencing the sale and adding value – A company who adopts this strategic value recognizes that service is very critical to the customer in their final selection to purchase a product.   In other words, it’s a value-added feature influencing the purchase decision. Dell is a great example of a company who uses service as a way of directly influencing the sale of products.
  2. Generating revenue and profits directly – This applies to any company that operates their service business as a profit center or strategic line of business. These companies recognize that customers are willing to pay for service independently from purchasing equipment. More importantly, their willingness to pay is based on the value-in-use of the service not it terms of the perceived cost. Much of IBM’s success in the 1990s was due to their ability to generate revenue and profits from directly selling services.
  3. Providing market control – Companies who embrace this value driver provide a broad array of services in order to gain account control. In essence, they engulf their customers with an extensive portfolio of basic and value added services in attempt to establish a trusted advisor position and influence future sales. GE is a prime example of a company that has achieved this result by offering its customers technology assessments, strategic planning, and other types of professional and value added services.

 

When establishing your strategic value it is important to select one and only one value driver.  Otherwise, it will lead to inconsistent performance and confusion in the market place. Strategic value cannot be defined in a vacuum, it must take into account the needs and requirements of your key stakeholders and align with your overall corporate strategy. For example, a company focused on generating services revenues and profits directly may find this goal at odds with its objective to increase market share in its product market.  Basically, the service division would be competing with the products line of business for resources and investments.   More importantly, your definition of strategic value will determine where you focus in terms of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), such as investment considerations, business constraints you must optimize, and possible market outcomes.

Strategic value when set into motion is difficult to alter since your entire service program and corporate objectives are based on this.  It often takes a commitment from the C-suite and/or board of directors as well as persistent and consistent follow through from management to successfully redefine your strategic value in terms of measurable outcomes.   This change should not be pursued lightly.  Those who succeed at redefining their strategic value often do so after very serious consideration, typically involving strategic market analysis, risk assessment, and scenario planning.

Strategic value is the DNA of your service business. If defined poorly, your strategic value maybe a liability and bankrupt your company.  If designed optimally and implemented effectively it can lead to unlimited upside potential.

Key Performance Indicators and their impact on your business

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I gave a presentation a couple of years ago to a group of service managers and executives on the subject of key performance indicators (KPIs).  I was surprised by the fact that most of the audience could not give an accurate explanation of what a KPI is.  Most people thought it was a data point that was used to measure business performance.   However, this is not entirely accurate.

The true definition of a KPI is that it is a quantifiable measure of how successful an organization’s strategies are in meeting their goals.   To be effective, KPIs must be specific to your business needs, align with strategic goals, and bring overall benefit to your business.  Most importantly, it must inspire you to set new goals.

Unfortunately, many service managers confuse KPIs with industry performance benchmarks.  They are not the same thing.  In contrast to a KPI, a benchmark is a point of reference against which things may be compared or assessed. While a company might want to benchmark their KPIs against competitors in their industry, they shouldn’t assume that they must adopt the same KPIs as their competitors.  They might want to do this if their goal is to outperform competitors on every KPI they measure.  This may be neither practical nor feasible if their business needs and strategic goals differ from those of their competitors.

Let’s look at this from another perspective.  While there maybe dozens of different field service or reverse logistics activities that your company can measure, you’ll find that there are only a handful that ultimately drive the success of your company’s business strategy.  You’ll want to make these specific measurements your KPIs.   For example, your strategic goal may be to consistently meet your customers’ expectations for timely service.  There could be multiple factors to consider when measuring this outcome like response time, wait time, resolution time, call drive time, etc.  However, you may determine that SLA Compliance is the KPI that best measures your success or failure in meeting this strategic goal.  On the other hand, your strategic goal might be to deliver high quality service to your customers.  While this could be determined through factors like trunk stock fill rate or calls closed incomplete due to lack of parts, you determine that First Time Fix Rate is the best KPI measuring service quality.

When establishing KPIs, it is important that you answer these four questions:

  1. How will I know when my goals are reached?  This is a quantitative target that you want to establish for your KPI. It could be expressed as a raw number (i.e., 4 hour average response time), a progress measure (e.g. 98% SLA compliance), or incremental change (i.e., 10% improvement in Customer Satisfaction).
  2. What are the key success factors in reaching this goal?   A description of the core functions, activities, or business practices that must be performed in order to reach this goal.
  3. What critical actions do I want to take from the KPIs? It is important to anticipate how your company will react to the KPI measurement that it actually achieves. What steps do you take if you miss your target? What if you meet or exceed it? For example, hire more resources, retrain personnel, improve processes, implement new systems, etc.
  4. What results do I achieve through these actions?  Examine how these actions will impact your business.  In what timeframe will they impact your KPI and at what cost?  Are there other aspects of your business that will be impacted?

 

By answering these questions, you’ll have a strategic road map for achieving operational excellence in your business.  It’s all about getting clear about your goals, making sure you measure the right things, tracking results on a consistent basis, taking corrective action when needed and, of course, celebrating success. Do you want to learn more about how to achieve geometric results in your field service or reverse logistics business?  Schedule a free strategy session today.