Driving Revenue Growth without Losing Sight of the Customers

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Several months ago, Derek Korte, the editor of Field Service Digital solicited my opinion for article titled “Expert Roundtable: Never Lose Sight of Customer Satisfaction”.    The basic question that Derek asked was “How do service leaders ensure the important work involved in managing a service business get done while still keeping the needs of customers involved?”  After all, Derek pointed out, Field Service leaders have a lot on their plate. They must continuously balance the need to improve the quality, productivity and efficiency of service operations with the strategic objective to drive revenue and growth; all while never losing sight of keeping customers happy.

This dilemma is a challenge facing all businesses not just Field Service.  When it comes to practical advice, Peter Drucker said it best, “the goal of any business is to get and keep customers.”  This quote provides a good lesson for Field Service leaders.  Driving revenue and growth, and maintaining customer satisfaction is not an either-or proposition.  They are one in the same.

To achieve superior outcomes in these two areas, Field Service leaders must view themselves as business owners.  They must view themselves as owners of a business franchise called “service” whether they are equity owners or not.  In other words, they must adopt an “ownership” mindset.

To succeed as business owners, Field Service leaders must first have the right “seats on the bus” otherwise known as the right functions that manage their service business.  This includes functions such as service delivery operations (i.e. dispatch, field service, parts management, etc.), accounting & finance, sales & marketing and others.  Without the right functions, the business cannot perform.

Second, Field Service leaders must make sure they have the right people in those seats. This means they must find talented people to manage these functions.  The people can be groomed from within the organization or recruited from outside.  Regardless, field service leaders must develop performance standards by which personnel must adhere.  These standards should consider the characteristics, skill sets, experience and behaviors that service personnel must possess.

Third, Field Service leader must have clear outcome of where they are heading.  If they are going to drive growth, then they must have a map to help them reach their destination.  In business, another term for a map is a strategy and/or plan.  Without a clearly defined strategy or plan to follow, a business can’t go very far.

Fourth and finally, Field Service leaders need to make sure their bus (i.e., their organization) is running efficiently. That it has a clean engine, good tires, etc. They also most make sure they have a GPS or dashboard to help them monitor their performance, the direction in which they are heading, and the speed at which they are going.  The engine, tires, etc. are a metaphor for state of the art service delivery infrastructure and related technologies that make superior service possible.  The GPS and dashboard are the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and operating benchmarks that help Field Service leaders keep course on their direction.

Now it’s your turn to answer the question: “How do service leaders ensure the important work involved in managing a service business get done while still keeping the needs of customers involved?”   What have you found that works and doesn’t work? If you’d like to read about other experts’ perspectives on this topic then read Derek’s online article.

Please also feel free to schedule a free strategy session with me today if you need more insight and guidance on how to improve service operations and drive revenue and growth while maintaining a high level of customer satisfaction.

Still looking for answers?

 

 

Strategies to make service more affordable

strategic service pricing

In my last blog post I discussed the strategic importance of continually finding ways to reduce cost of operations while enhancing service quality. A company can benefit from their cost savings in the form of higher profits or by passing them on to customers in the form of lower prices. Most rational business owners and executives would probably choose higher profits over lower prices unless of course lowering prices is a matter of survival. However, cost reduction is not the only strategy for achieving this outcome.

As I mentioned in my last post, there are a number of market focused strategies that a company can pursue that can result in offering customers services at a more affordable fee. Let’s examine them:

  • Standardization The establishment of standard, well-defined service modules or portfolios can lead to reduced cost through the ability to control the human element and ensure consistency in the service delivery process. McDonald’s is a good example of a company that employs standardization in their service strategy.   In the High-Tech Service & Support Industry, standardization may take the form of offering the customer a bronze, silver, and gold service package.
  • Use of alternative delivery systems To reduce investment and operating costs a company can find alternative ways to deliver service to their customers. In other words, they can make it possible for customers to be more involved in the service delivery process. Electronic banking, including bank-by-phone and the use of ATMs, are examples of this type of service strategy. In the High-Tech Service & Support Industry, this may take the form of an internet portal that allows customers to issue work orders directly to Field Service Engineers or perform troubleshooting on their own.
  • Market segmentation and focus on price sensitivityThere are, of course, significant service sub-market segments, some of which are price-insensitive. However, price-sensitive service market segments also exist. In general, those customers who are more price-sensitive will tend to do a greater portion of the service themselves, including self-maintenance and delivery functions, which might normally be done by the external service vendor at an added cost. IKEA, a furniture distribution organization, is an example of service directed toward the low-priced customer base. As such, they leave services such as picking, delivery, and assembly up to the customer. Medical Device companies do this by offering parts only service contracts.
  • Changing service response and completion times. A final tactic that could be utilized to reduce costs or increase margins is to change or lengthen the service response time and delivery characteristics. In essence, some customers are simply willing to wait longer to reduce service costs), than others. (Some customers want and need rapid response and are willing to pay a premium for such service.

 

Companies seeking to make service more affordable to customers can pursue any or all of these options and still achieve healthy profit margins. Now it’s your turn. Do you have a segment of the market that is price sensitive? Which option would you implement to better serve them? Please share with me you thoughts or experiences you’ve had when it comes to this issue. Still searching for answers, schedule a free consultation today.

Is it time for a mid-course correction?

mid course correction2

 

The summer is here and with it brings the beginning of the second half of the year. This is great time for re-evaluating progress in meeting our business goals.  It represents a half-way point to determine if we are on track for the year, if we need to change course in direction, or simply act with greater resolve and urgency to achieve our outcomes.

One thing that we uncovered in our recent Readership Survey is that a large percentage (47.7%) of subscribers desire to learn about strategies for achieving better results. The most frequently occurring response when respondents were asked about what they want to achieve in their business over the next 3-5 years in “growth”.  I think that it is safe to say that many of our readers can benefit from strategies that will help them achieve higher levels of growth.

In my attempt to provide readers with more of what they want, let me give you some action steps to follow if you find that your actual growth for this year is not in line with your original target.   First, remember that the trend is your friend.  This means that you need to periodically evaluate your market to determine if the trend is working in your favor.   You’ll want to get a handle on the size and growth rate of the market you serve, the level of competition, industry dynamics, buyer behavior, and purchasing criteria.   You can uncover this information through internet research, market surveys, analysts, and other secondary sources of data such as articles, press releases, annual reports, etc.

Assuming you’ve concluded that the market you serve is large and growing, then you need to ensure you have the right marketing strategy in place to capture your share of this opportunity.  Think of your marketing strategy in terms of a triad.

market strategy triadAt the base of this triad is your company’s performance.  The ability of your company to deliver on its promise is critical to keeping customers. If they are happy with your service, they will tell others and you will gain word of mouth referrals.  The second side of the triad is the value your company provides to customers. Is it defined in a way that the value is clear and compelling to current and potential customers?  Value is often defined by the quality of your offering and the little things you do to win over the customer.  For example, are you providing them with options so they get exactly what they want?  It also includes offering great service and support before they buy.

The third side of the marketing strategy triad is your tactics.  You want to make sure that you are implementing tactics that will drive customers to you and encourage them to do business with you.  Tactics to consider are pricing, social media, advertising, promotion, etc.  Most importantly, the tactics you use must be consistent with the other elements of your triad.  In other words, your advertising and pricing tactics must align with the value you provide and the performance you deliver, and vice versa.

This triad provides a good framework for evaluating the results of your marketing efforts. Like most frameworks, they are only effective if use them as an analytical tool.  If sales are not where you want them to be then look at your marketing strategy triad. Use it to evaluate how effective your performance, value, and tactics are in attracting and keeping customers.  It will provide you with insights on how and where to improve.  If used consistently, it will enable to you win more than you fair share of business.

Enterprise Service Management System Trends

 

enterprise-service-management2There has been a lot of attention given in recent years to the need to automate field service and related logistical processes through the implementation of Enterprise Service Management (ESM) systems.   Although the benefits from improved automation are well documented, there is still a segment of the market that is facing challenges to achieving measurable productivity and efficiency gains associated with key service performance metrics.  This shortcoming is due in part to lack of integration between Field Service and Reverse/Service Logistics functions.  The growing trend toward remote support combined with the increasing reliance on spare parts in the service resolution process places even greater demands on equipment service providers to ensure their field service and related logistical process are both integrated and optimized.   We conducted a survey among a cross representative sample of companies in the High Technology Service & Support Industry to validate these assumptions.  Over 250 respondents participated in the survey.  The survey results reveal a number of very interesting trends:

  • Greater reliance on Remote Support: The survey results support the fact that more and more service requests are being resolved remotely without the need to dispatch a field service engineer. More importantly, a large percentage of these remote activities are resolved by sending a replacement part to the customer site.
  • Best of Breed Solutions outperform Integrated Solutions: Despite the breadth of functionality found within integrated enterprise systems, our results indicated a higher level of satisfaction with Best of Breed solutions than with Integrated ESM platforms. We believe this is because best of breed solutions are more focused on the detailed processes and transactions involved in managing a field service and/or reverse logistics operation.
  • Perceived Gaps in Reverse Logistics functionality: Many companies perceive their ESM solutions have gaps in the ability to deal with Reverse/Service Logistics issues particularly when it comes to depot repair activities.
  • Integrated Automation is critical to success: The level of integrated automation between Field Service and Reverse/Service Logistics functionality has a direct impact on ESM effectiveness. More importantly companies with a high level of integrated automation perform better on key service performance metrics than those who do not.

 

In summary, our research findings reveal that companies who have been able to successfully integrate Field Service and Reverse/Service Logistics processes report a higher level of service performance than those who have not.  The most effective integrated solutions are those that incorporate best of breed functionality for both Field Service and Reverse/Service Logistics processes.  More importantly, the data reveals that these integrated solutions are not only highly effective in managing ongoing service requirements but essential to overcoming critical business challenges.

We’d like to thank IFS, a leading provider of Enterprise Service Management systems, for sponsoring our research study.  IFS has made available the results of our study in a 14 page whitepaper that can be downloaded at Whitepaper Download.   To better understand the implications of these findings to your organization or to define requirements for a best of breed, integrated solution, schedule a free strategy session with us today by clicking here.

The Five Most Important Trends Impacting the ITAD Market

Recycle

In my last blog post, I provided a high level summary of key findings from the recent market research study we conducted for Arrow Electronics on the topic of IT Asset Disposition Trends.   Now that I’ve piqued your interest, I thought I’d share five important data points from the survey results:

  1. 9 out of 10 companies in 2014 have a formal end-of-life ITAD strategy
  2. Nearly 2 out of 3 companies surveyed choose to have a 3rd party service provider manage their end-of-life assets
  3. The most important factors in selecting a 3rd party service provider are adoption of compliance standards, well documented chain of custody, and high quality reporting
  4. 95% of companies feel that R2 and/or e-Stewards are the most important environmental standards related to ITAD
  5. Nearly 9 out of 10 companies feel that R2 and e-Stewards should be combined into a single standard

 

These findings validate the fact the ITAD has gained increased attention among not only IT Managers but C-suite executives as well.  However, these findings reveal that most companies do not view ITAD as a core competency.  Instead they choose to outsource it to 3rd Party Service providers.  This explains the increased level of competition within the ITAD market as more and more companies enter this space.  It is not just start-up specialized ITAD vendors that are pursing this opportunity but well established IT Service providers and distributors like Arrow Electronics who view ITAD as a natural extension of their product and service offerings.

Given the large playing field of competitors, end-customers are becoming increasingly selective about who they choose to conduct business with.  Among the most important factors are compliance standards, documented chain of custody, and IT reporting and analytics.  It is interesting that while R2 and e-Stewards are perceived as the most important environmental standards, an overwhelming majority of end-customers believe that they should be combined into one, single standard. This suggests that these standards are used interchangeably by end-customers.  Possessing one or both of these industry standards is simply not enough for an ITAD service provider to differentiate itself in the marketplace. While many companies can lay claim to a well-documented chain of custody and superior reporting capabilities, we believe that its additional industry standards such as RIOS, ADISA, NIST, and knowledge of best practices to minimize risk, reduce waste, and maximize recovery values that set one ITAD vendor apart from one another.  If you haven’t read the Arrow IT Asset Disposition Trends Report, we suggest you obtain a copy, click here.    To discuss the implications of this report on your company or business, feel free to schedule a free 30-minute strategy session with us today.

A Strategic Analysis of ITAD Trends

ITAD

The data is now in from our large scale market survey conducted on behalf of Arrow Electronics on the subject of IT Asset Disposition (ITAD) trends.  The results validate a popularly held view among IT industry practitioners that ITAD considerations continue to be a top concern for all size companies.   In fact, knowledge of ITAD best practices continues to evolve and improve among C-suite and IT Executives.  However, as one might expect the issues and concerns between the two groups vary somewhat.

Our research also indicates that all companies, regardless of size, are more likely today than in the past to budget for the ITAD process.  In addition, corporations are becoming more aware of penalties arising from improper disposal of IT assets, which has led to an increased implementation of formal ITAD strategies.  While the most important factors for creating an ITAD strategy have remained the same over the last few years (data security concerns, commitment to “Green” business practices, and mitigating legal and financial risks), companies are far less likely to apply their ITAD strategy outside of North America.  It is also clear that companies who have developed a formal end-of-life ITAD strategy are far more likely to have an ITAD provider handle their IT assets when compared with companies who do not have a formal ITAD strategy.

Companies using a 3rd party service provider to manage their end-of-life IT assets are currently very satisfied with their providers.  When choosing these providers, ISO industry certifications are particularly important, with R2 and e-Stewards being the most important environmental standards.  Due to their equal level of importance and credibility, most companies feel that R2 and e-Stewards should be combined into one standard.

While most companies have a data security policy regarding their end-of-life assets, data security concerns are still prevalent.  Data security concerns are particularly high among companies with a formal ITAD strategy as well as companies who use 3rd party service providers.  Most companies use multiple tactics to alleviate data security concerns, which includes using 3rd party service providers.  However, with nearly 2 out of 3 companies selecting a method such as “Delete the file directory on the hard drive” which does not fully eliminate the potential for data security breaches, there remains some uncertainty as to which methods are truly effective.

With most companies adopting a BYOD policy that allows employees to bring at least one device to work, there has been a dramatic increase in the implementation of policies to ensure that company data on BYOD devices is secure during active use.  The vast majority of companies are also implementing policies to ensure that company data on BYOD devices is eradicated once those devices are no longer active on the company network.

Corporate social responsibility/sustainability has also become increasingly important, with approximately 93% of companies expected to have a program in place by the end of 2015.  Companies who currently have a corporate social responsibility/sustainability program in place typically report their program’s progress in their annual report and/or other forms of corporate communication, both public and private.

The cloud is having a significant impact on the purchase of IT assets, with a majority of companies purchasing more assets to support the cloud.  Some of these additional assets purchased likely include tablets, whose use continues to increase.  As a result, ITAD practices and policies will continue a critical topic among C-suite executives and ITAD Managers.

Details of our survey results can be found in the Arrow IT Asset Disposition Trends Report. To obtain a copy, click here.

The Impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management – Part II

interent of things

As follow-up to last week’s blog post, I wanted to share some more answers to Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the impact on IoT on Enterprise Service Management (ESM):

  1. What new skills sets are required to support an IoT environment?   IoT generates an extensive amount of real time data, some of which of is unstructured. In order to make use of this data in any meaningful way, a service provider will need to employ “data scientists”. These are individuals skilled at analyzing and interpreting data through predictive analytics.
  2. What impact will IoT have on Call Center personnel? The always on nature of IoT and its ability to send automatic alerts to the service organization will reduce the demand for personnel that handle basic call handling and dispatching procedures. However, there will be a greater need for remote support personnel with the ability to monitor service events in real-time, apply predictive analytics, and initiate corrective action.
  3. What will be the role for Field Service Engineers (FSE)? IoT has the ability to improve the percentage of service events that are resolved remotely without dispatching a FSE.   This does not necessarily equate to a diminished role for FSEs. In fact, the need for FSEs will increase. First, FSEs will be required to deploy IoT solutions. Second, FSEs will be needed to provide onsite diagnostics and troubleshooting when remote resolutions prove ineffective. Third, FSEs will function in the role of onsite consultant in helping the customer obtain maximum benefit from the technology operating at their site.
  4. How will IoT impact the Supply Chain?  Most people agree that IoT will enable Supply Chain personnel to proactively ship a replacement part or consumable to the end-customer before the customer is even aware of their need. The reverse logistics supply chain will also benefit from IoT in the sense that it will gain better visibility into events occurring at the field level that impact demand on return center and depot repair operations.

I know that these answers barely scratch the surface of the questions people have about the impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management (ESM).  In the weeks and months ahead, I will continue to share my insights on IoT and ESM.  As always, I am interested in other people’s perspectives on this subject.  Please feel free to post any comments, thoughts, or fun facts that could help advance the body of knowledge around this subject.

The Impact of IoT on Enterprise Service Management – Part I

iot 1

Last week I attended the IFS World Conference 2015 in Boston, MA and participated in a panel on the subject of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its impact on Enterprise Service Management (ESM).   The other members of the panel included Adam Brody, Director of Enterprise Systems at Sysmex America, Inc. and Tom Bowe, Global Industry Director, IFS, Inc.   We were asked some great questions by our moderator Jon Briggs and members of the audience who were comprised of industry analysts, members of the press, and other influencers.

I am taking the liberty in this blog post of sharing some the key questions that were poised to us and the answers I provided.  Here they are:

  1. Which service industries will be affected by IoT?  It is hard to imagine any industry that will not be affected by IoT especially when it comes to the area of service and support.   As long as there is a way to connect a sensor to electronic or electromechanical equipment, there’s an opportunity for IoT.
  2. How will the end-customers benefit from IoT?  The conventional wisdom is that IoT enables proactive service management. If you can see what’s happening with the equipment in real-time, then you can predict and anticipate what may happen next. Pre-emptive actions could be taken to avoid downtime or prevent failure.
  3. What is the financial gain to manufacturers from IoT? Manufacturers can collect real-time data related to system reliability and maintainability issues which enable them to be more precise in managing service resources.   More importantly, IoT provides manufacturers with a vehicle for offering premium priced services like remote monitoring and diagnostics, automatic replenishment of consumables, and proactive service management.
  4. Will there be divergence in usage between B2B and B2C applications? It’s possible that some segments of the consumer market may be resistant to IoT because they believe that it intrudes on their personnel privacy.
  5. What are the challenges to IoT adoption? One of the biggest challenges to using IoT Technology to transform service management is that it requires updates to the existing technology infrastructure. Some technology out there is 10 years old. If you really want to adopt IoT throughout the enterprise, every piece of technology has to be IoT-enabled. That’s going to take some time. Another challenge is learning how to make use of all the data and information collected by IoT.

 

We covered a few other important topics in this panel discussion which I plan to share in next week’s blog post, so stay tuned.  You might also want to check out the article appearing in Tech Target from Laura Eberle titled “How is the IoT changing Enterprise Service Management?”   Laura did a great job covering the key salient points from this discussion.  Last but not least, I’d appreciate it if you could add to this conversation by sharing your perspective on IoT and what impact it will have on enterprise service management.

Treat salespeople like the valuable assets they are

sales people 3

With so much merger and acquisition activity occurring within the High Tech Industry, I thought it would make sense to understand how sellers should deal with their most valuable assets, their salespeople.  I posed this question to my friend and business partner, Joe Vanore at Everingham & Kerr, who gave me permission to republish this article from the company’s June/July 2014 newsletter….

Knowledgeable, experienced salespeople with strong customer relationships are worth their weight in gold — or perhaps the premium paid to acquire their company. So the last thing you want to do as you integrate your acquisition is alienate this valuable group of employees. Instead, focus on convincing sales staff of your merger’s merits and involving them in the planning process.

Thwarting the competition

As soon as your deal is announced, competitors are likely to contact your target’s customers to persuade them to jump ship, claiming that your combined organization will be too big or bureaucratic to effectively serve them. Competitors will also attempt to recruit your best salespeople.

Act quickly to thwart competitors’ efforts and reap the benefits that attracted you to the transaction in the first place. Help salespeople communicate the deal to customers by preparing a script that explains expected changes and how customers will benefit. Include FAQs and provide the name of a person in the organization who can answer questions your sales staff can’t.

Face to face meetings

Also be sensitive to the morale in the sales department. It’s not enough to communicate upcoming events via e-mail. CEOs of both organizations need to meet face-to-face with their salespeople as soon as possible to address rumors, reassure employees of their job security and discuss potential opportunities within the merged organization. Keep these presentations short and spend time listening to employee concerns.

Salespeople will — above all — want to know how the deal will affect them. For example:

  1. Will the sales forces of the two companies be combined?
  2. Will salespeople now be expected to sell the other company’s products or services?
  3. Will compensation and benefits change?
  4. How will the new sales department be structured, and who will manage it?

 

If you don’t know the answer to a question off hand, promise that you’ll respond as soon as possible — then keep your word. Following these meetings, salespeople can return to their work and communicate a consistent message to existing and potential customers.

Financial Incentives

Even the most loyal employee will consider a competitor’s offer if the price is right. So consider financial incentives, if you hope to retain top sales producers (and their customers) and encourage staff to cooperate with new colleagues and share knowledge.  Offering retention bonuses and rewards for maintaining and increasing sales — in addition to existing compensation plans — can help. Make such incentives easy to understand and clearly achievable. While interim bonus programs may be expensive in the near term, they can prevent sales from dropping off during the merger process. And they will help you generate far more long-term revenue to offset the immediate cost.

Ask the real experts

Because they work in the trenches, salespeople may have cross-selling and other ideas. Create a temporary sales leadership team to evaluate possible downside risk and increased sales potential. The team should include two to four seasoned salespeople who focus their efforts on retaining customers and maintaining sales during the integration.

There are many ways the team can help accomplish these goals. It can serve as a clearinghouse for customer concerns and employee confusion over the future of product and service offerings. Team members also might have ideas for new product and service offerings or combinations. Sales leaders can be valuable in identifying and monitoring at-risk accounts.

A fragile link

Although all personnel affected by a merger deserve honest communications and an opportunity to voice their concerns, it’s particularly important to keep salespeople in the loop. Your sales staff is your direct link to customers, and this link can be broken if it’s not handled with care.

Seven Ways to Win at Service Marketing

Market-Research1

Revenue growth is probably the single most important objective for executives who are responsible for managing service as a profit center or strategic line of business.  “I want to double my service revenue in the next 3-5 years” is an incantation that I hear constantly from business owners and executives.  That equates to a 20% or more growth rate per year.  Sure, this type of growth is easily achievable if the market is growing at this rate or faster.  I’ve found that these high growth targets are often triggered by management’s desire to take back market share from competitors or increase the share of service revenue contribution to overall corporate revenue.

While high revenue growth in a low growth market is difficult, it’s not impossible. A little hard work is usually required to achieve this type of performance.  To understand where the emphasis is needed, let’s look at where service market programs may fall short:

  1. Service Portfolio not meeting customer needs: Quite often service providers fail to meet their revenue objectives because their service portfolio is no longer meeting customer requirements. In other words, they have failed to offer services tailored to their customer needs. For example, offering only next day response when customers require same day.
  2. Pricing not optimal: If your revenue is flat or declining, you might want to look at how you price your services. Perhaps you service prices are no longer competitive. On the other hand, you may be underpricing your services in relation to the value you provide.
  3. Failure to understand competitive threats:   Many service providers, particularly those that are divisions of manufacturers, fail to understand the competitive threat of “mom & pop” third party maintenance (TPM) companies and/or in-house service providers.  For example, they often under estimate the value that TPMs provide to their customer and/or fail to develop an effective value proposition to compete against them.
  4. Failure to articulate value: How well have you articulated the value of your service offering to current and prospective customers? Do they understand the cost of downtime or the pain points that your services help solve? It is important that you not only articulate value to your customers but make sure that your sales people understand it and provide them with the appropriate sale aides and marketing collateral to support it. 
  5. Lack of communication & follow-up: One way to increase service revenue is by improving contract renewal rates. These rates often decline though lack of consistent communication and persistent follow-up about the value of services provided, when contracts are up for renewal, special incentives for renewing, and information on when they are about to expire. 
  6. Not asking for referrals: Referrals are the best and least expensive source of qualified prospects. The problem is most service providers forget to ask for them. Remember your customers speak to each other. They may be involved in the same networks and trade associations, or call on each other for advice and guidance. Why not enlist them in your business development efforts? 
  7. Lack of customer appreciation:    Your customers will remain loyal to you and purchase more from you when you let them know how much you value and appreciate them. It’s the simple things like a courtesy phone call/visit, thank you card, small gift (i.e., rewards program), or special offer that let them know you value their business.

 

These seven areas have one thing in common, they all benefit from market research.  Whether its information that will help you redesign your service portfolio or modify pricing, market research provides you with an unbiased and unfiltered perspective on what your customers are actually thinking and saying. You will learn things that you may not otherwise from a sale’s call or courtesy call made by a company executive.

Before you conduct research or make any changes, it is important that you have a baseline assessment of how well you service marketing program is working. You may want to consider an audit from an independent and objective industry consultant.     Schedule a free consultation today to learn more.