The Role of Data in the Servitization Journey

Data is becoming more important as we consider one of the most significant trends impacting the technology industry, "Servitization".

Several years ago, Blumberg Advisory Group worked with a company that provided hardware maintenance on film based photo labs found in big box retail outlets. Their service revenues and profits were declining because digital photography was replacing the need for film based photo labs. Although the client offered a new digital based technology to replace film based photo-labs, these systems were not being installed at the same rate as the older systems were being phased out.   Digital systems didn’t require as much service and support. They were less complex and easier to maintain than their film-based cousins.

Our client required a new strategy to offset their declining revenues and profits.  They needed a solution urgently or the parent company would shut down this division.  If we did not know the importance of data or the concept of managing the capability to serve, we would have probably recommended that the client lay off some of its field service workforce to reduce costs and improve profits.  This could have led to a downward spiral of layoffs, company morale and growth.

So what steps did we take?  We analyzed their data.  We reviewed their field engineer utilization rates, customer response times, field engineer skill levels, and the equipment on customers’ premises.  In conclusion, we found that their field engineers were not being completely utilized.  We found out that these engineers had further knowledge and expertise in supporting other types of equipment found on the customer site.  They were typically able to respond to a customer request within four hours even though the guarantee was for eight.  

Based on our analysis, we recommended that they expand their service footprint to other types of equipment located on the customers’ premises, i.e. electronic cash registers and point of sale equipment.  We also recommended that they charge a premium price to customers who required faster (e.g., 4 hour) response time.  As a result, this client went from losing 20% of their profits per year to a 50% increase in new business within 24 months of implementing our recommendations.

Ultimately, the key to our client’s success lied within the data.  Data is becoming more important as we consider one of the most significant trends impacting the Technology Industry, “Servitization”.  This trend describes the transformation that many companies are undertaking as they move from primarily selling products to generating a sizable portion of revenue and profits from services.   Ultimately, the path toward Servitization leads companies toward offering anything as a service (XaaS).  In other words, their business has reached the stage of development where they are no longer selling products or solutions to their customers, but outcomes.   For example, instead of selling a copier machine they are selling their customer the right to use the machine to produce a certain number of copies over a specific period or time.

To deliver on this promise, the provider must not only have great people, process, and technology but access to data related in terms of machine condition and performance (e.g., alerts and notifications), parts availability, field engineer location and skill sets, diagnostics, etc.  With this data in hand, the provider can ensure resources are available when needed and that the customer receives the outcome it purchased.  The data is made available through technologies like the Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, etc.   Examples of companies that are along the servitization journey are Rolls Royce, ABB, Siemens, Kone, and General Electric. They have generated profitable income and know that a truly exceptional service business is built on four foundations – people, process, technology, and data.

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Field Service Scheduling Software and What You Need to Know

Scheduling software has long been a foundational technology for field service companies allowing them to meet customer demands.

This article initially appeared in Field Service News – September 7, 2018

 

Michael Blumberg, President of the Blumberg Advisory Group lifts the lid on all of the key aspects of this crucial tool…

If you have spent any time in Field Service, you probably understand the importance of managing service delivery functions against key performance indicators (KPIs). Among the most critical KPIs in the Field Service Leaders track are First Time Fix (FTF), Service Level Agreement (SLA) Compliance or Onsite Response Time (ORT), and Mean Time to Repair (MTTR). These KPIs measure the effectiveness of a Field Service Organization (FSOs) in delivering quality service in a timely manner.

The inability to meet KPI targets may result in exponential costs, customer attrition and loss of revenue; whereas the ability to exceed customer expectations can result in customer appreciation followed by an increase in profit margins and sales. To effectively schedule/dispatch the right technician to arrive on time with the right parts and skillset plays a significant role in meeting these outcomes. This is definitely not a small feat for your typical FSO.

Scheduling and dispatching Field Service Engineers (FSE) poses a challenge for most FSOs, particularly those with more than 5 FSEs. The reason behind this is there are many variables and factors involved.

An FSO with only one or two FSEs and a few customers may not perceive scheduling to be a major challenge. The volume of service requests may be relatively low while the options of who, when and where to send them may be rather limited. Scheduling becomes more of a challenge as the volume of service requests (i.e., customers) and the number of FSEs increases.

Adding to this complexity are the business objectives and/or constraints an FSO must optimize to meet its scheduling requirements.

With additional constraints or objectives, the more difficult it becomes to produce a solid schedule. For example, if the objective is to only meet a response time commitment to the customer, then the decision is easy – assign the FSE who can arrive in a timely manner at the customer’s site.

If FTF, MTTR, and/or SLA Compliance targets are also part of the equation, it becomes even more difficult to produce that solid schedule. Adding a profit margin objective, high call volumes, multiple geographies, and a sizable pool of FSEs, the decision becomes even more overwhelming.

The reason why scheduling is so excruciating of a task is that there are numerous factors that an FSO would need to create and evaluate to determine the optimal assignment for each FSE.

This is a time-consuming activity that requires an extensive amount of computational power to achieve. Many companies have suffered from a loss of time and resources in dealing with confusion and potential human error. The solution is Dynamic Scheduling Software.

Dynamic Scheduling Software provides FSOs with the feature-rich functionality that streamlines, automates, and optimizes scheduling decisions.

This technology ensures the FSO sends the assigned technician to the right job having the proper skill set and arriving on time. These applications typically leverage a scheduling engine that optimizes FSE job assignment. Scheduling engines vary in their complexity ranging from those based on business rules to Linear Programming (i.e. goodness of fit) techniques, Operations Research Algorithms (e.g., Quantum Annealing, Genetic Algorithms, etc.), or Artificial Intelligence (AI)/Self-Learning applications.

The complexity of the scheduling problem, number and types of resources involved, duration of tasks, and objectives to be optimized play a role in determining which scheduling engine is most functional.

Critical factors to consider may include whether the scheduling engine can handle:

  • Multi-day projects or short duration field service visits,
  • People and assets (e.g., tools, parts, trucks, equipment) or solely people,
  • The number and types of KPIs that are part of the objective, and
  • Route planning requirements.

In evaluating Dynamic Scheduling Software, FSOs are also advised to consider the following criteria:

  • Cloud versus On-Premise Deployment Options
  • Speed and Ease of Implementation
  • Integration with Back-office Systems
  • Availability of Real-time Visibility by the Customer
  • FSO Requirements for Best of Breed or Integrated Enterprise Solution
  • Total Cost of Ownership
  • Return on Investment
  • Vendor Industry Knowledge and Experience

There are over a dozen software vendors who offer some form of dynamic scheduling functionality for field service.

Obviously, no two Dynamic Scheduling applications are alike. Each one has their points of differentiation. The best solution is a function of the level of importance the FSO places on each criterion and how each vendor meets these criteria.

Regardless of which vendor is selected, the benefits of Dynamic Scheduling are clear.

In fact, industry benchmarks show that companies who implement these types of solutions can achieve a 20% to 25% improvement in operating efficiency, field service productivity, and utilization. The impact on bottom line profitability and customer satisfaction is substantial. To enable FSOs to provide customers with an Uber-like experience and significant profitability, FSOs should consider deploying Dynamic Scheduling Software as part of their service delivery infrastructure.

Is Now The Right Time To Replace Your Field Service Management Software?

 This article first appeared in August 20, 2018 online issue of Field Technologies Online 

The market for field service management (FSM) software market is large and growing. In 2017, the market for cloud- based applications was valued at $1.2 billion by Blumberg Advisory Group, and we anticipate that the market will experience a five-year compound annual growth of 22.8 percent. In other words, it will more than double by 2022.  

Given the size and growth of this market, it is no wonder that dozens of software vendors are vying for share. Each vendor claims that their software will help field service organizations (FSOs) transform operations, keep up with industry trends, adhere to best practices, increase profits, and maximize customer satisfaction.

These claims are prompting many field service leaders to evaluate if now might be the right time to replace their existing FSM solution.  Being rational business managers, field service leaders need logical reasons to upgrade or replace their software. Of course, there are many reasons but some are good and some are not so very good. With more than three decades of experience with this topic, let me share with you five good reasons why NOW might be the right time to make a change:

  1. Your current system is costly to operate and maintain. Lets’ face it, if you are spending too much to operate and maintain your existing system, then it is probably time to replace it. Typically, companies that operate antiquated, disjointed, and/or fragmented systems experience higher IT operating expenses than those who do not. I worked with one client whose IT operating expense were 12 percent of revenue (while best in class is 4 percent). The cost savings alone was enough to justify the purchase of a new system.  
     
  2. Your existing FSM software is hindering growth. Depending on its feature functionality, your FSM software can either facilitate or limit your company’s growth. A few years ago, I helped a client expand into a new service business. Unfortunately, their existing systems did not have the required functionality to manage the transactions and workflow of this new business. As a result, my client had to postpone the launch of the new business until they could replace their system.
     
  3. You can’t get good data from your current software. This is one of the most frequently cited reasons for replacing software. If you can’t obtain good data on your installed base, equipment service histories, field service engineer skill sets, cost of service, failure rates, etc., then your company is at a disadvantage because it lacks the business intelligence to effectively plan and manage resources. 
     
  4. Your current solution is impacting KPIs. Ultimately, the success of your FSO’s ability to meet financial targets and keep customers happy depends on its ability to manage service processes against KPIs. For example, first-time fix, SLA/response time compliance, MTTR (mean time to repair), etc. If your company’s performance trails significantly from industry average or best in class, then it is possible your FSM is to blame. Perhaps its time to consider replacing your current system with one that does a better job and drives performance gains?
     
  5. Your current solution lacks flexibility and scalability. It is important that your FSM software can scale up or down without a massive investment in capital or labor. In addition, it should offer flexibility in terms of how workers can share and access data as well as flexibility or openness in terms of the ability to add on third party applications.     

There will always be software vendors who offer new and innovative applications to the field service market. The desire to keep up with industry trends and best practices will also drive purchasing decisions. Implementing a new solution can be costly and time consuming, even if the ROI exists. Therefore, the decision to switch should not be made lightly. You can use these five reasons to provide an objective framework for decision making.  

Preparing for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Antonia Kay gives a preview of WBR's upcoming event in St. Louis

Worldwide Business Research (WBR) will be hosting the Connected Manufacturing Forum on June 19-20, 2018 in St Louis, MO. I recently had the chance to talk to Antonia Kay, the Program Director, about a few emerging trends impacting the Manufacturing Industry.

1. What are the biggest challenges facing the Manufacturing Industry today, specifically when it comes to Industry 4.0?

We are at the beginning of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which will fundamentally change our lives. Things that we deemed impossible or futuristic as children – artificial intelligence, human-like robots, drones, self-driving cars – are quickly becoming an everyday reality. As fascinating as it may sound, these technological advancements translate into a lot of uncertainty and hard work for industrial leaders tasked with “giving a facelift” to their manufacturing ecosystems.

The biggest challenge most executives are facing today is mapping out their digitalization journey, making first steps towards connectivity and automation, and adapting their company culture to the drastic change that comes with the digital transformation. As of today, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to connected manufacturing, but top global industrials are investing in IoT, cloud computing, advanced analytics, robotic process automation, and 3D printing in order to capture opportunities early on and secure their competitive edge in future.

2. What do you see as the most important trends and opportunities with respect to Industry 4.0?

The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is the word of the day.

Global manufacturing organizations are investing in predictive maintenance and condition monitoring – the move from don’t fix what’s not broken to making sure things don’t break through continuous, smart monitoring and maintenance of the factory equipment.

Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are big too, as they can drive equipment optimization and productivity on the factory floor and beyond.

And, of course, there is an ever-present talk about Big Data and advanced analytics – how do you collect and secure your data assets, how do you leverage it for informed decision making, product/service innovation and, eventually, improved customer satisfaction?

The opportunities that come with connecting people, processes, and assets are endless. The question is, how do you do it?

3. What is the Connected Manufacturing Forum and why should people attend?

Connected Manufacturing Forum is a networking and learning platform for Industry 4.0 frontrunners who are ready to move past fear of the unknown and revolutionize their business, one step at a time.

4. Can you give an overview of what people will get?

Connected Manufacturing Forum will offer a comprehensive coverage of the main Industry 4.0 trends and will help manufacturing leaders find answers to their toughest digitalization questions.

We have a good number of real-life case studies focused on Industry 4.0 blueprint development and implementation, projects that have helped companies like Johnson & Johnson, LEGO, Intel, Boeing, Coca-Cola and more start their connected manufacturing transformation, align teams around the same goals and prepare for future industry advancements.

Cultural change and workforce management is a big topic this year – executive leaders from Georg Fischer, Kuhn Krause, Subaru, Nature’s Variety will share best practices in preparing your organization for the Industry 4.0 revolution, delivering required training to your existing employees and expanding your talent pool by attracting new, highly skilled workers who will drive the future of your company.

Lastly, we will be discussing innovative technologies – IoT, augmented reality (AR), 3D printing, robotics, sensor technologies, human machine interface (HMI), predictive analytics – that can help companies improve processes and optimize efficiencies.

5. Why did WBR choose to produce the event, and how will it be different from other events focused on Industry 4.0?

Our in-depth market research indicated that there was a high need for an Industry 4.0 conference that would help industry leaders benchmark their connected manufacturing strategies and find solutions to the toughest digitalization challenges.

While there are many smart manufacturing events out there, the quality of our content and the seniority and experience of our topnotch speakers by far outweigh competition and what other events have to offer. Our program was developed through in-depth interviews with Fortune 500 executive leaders and is packed with case studies, panels, roundtable discussions, and interactive workshops focused on real-life challenges that manufacturing executives are trying to overcome on a daily basis. Our goal is to help them do just that and progress to the next digitalization level.

6. What will people be missing if they do not attend?

They’ll miss out on top-quality, real-life content and outstanding industry networking opportunities. If your company is going through a digital transformation, you simply can’t miss Connected Manufacturing Forum!

7. If they must come up with one reason why to attend, what should it be?

Connected Manufacturing Forum is your one stop shop for all things Industry 4.0. Have questions about digitalization? Don’t know how to roll out an IoT initiative and deliver on it? Want to learn from the best in the industry and meet the most innovative solution providers? Then hurry up and register today!

Register to join 150+ executives in a collaborative debate on the emerging Industry 4.0 trends in Manufacturing, Technology, Operations, and Advanced Engineering.

And as a bonus to my readers, use code CM18BLUMBERG to save 25% on your ticket!

REGISTER NOW

5 Barriers to Digital Transformation

Howard Tiersky is the President and Founder of FROM, The Digital Transformation Agency. He has a deep passion for digital innovation and helping each of client find success. This blog first appeared on his website.

You may be struggling to drive some sort of change, innovation, or digital transformation within your organization right now.

Why is it so hard? And what’s the secret to getting big companies to successfully transform?

There are five main barriers that large enterprises face when trying to innovate: change resistance, knowledge of customers, risk management, organizational agility and transformation vision.

Change resistance
Change is uncomfortable. Even if a change sets us up for a great future, most people won’t warm up to it quickly. To successfully drive change within an organization, create a burning platform for change so that failing to change is more painful than the change itself. Offer a compelling vision of the future once the change is complete, give people the confidence of success, and provide the opportunity to help create the change (instead of falling victim to it).

Knowledge of customers
You may think you have the answers, but how well do you actually know your customers? To incorporate your customers’ voice into your product development, you can use these five tactics:

  • Humility: Truthfully, we don’t even know ourselves that well, so it’s important to recognize that understanding someone else well enough to predict future behavior is no small feat.
  • Specificity: Figure out exactly what you need to know about your current or potential users that would make a difference to your product development. Use questions like: “What do you they like or not like about your product?” and “What are their unmet needs?”
  • Involvement: Get your whole team involved in customer research to allow the entire development process to include an understanding of the customers’ world and their current reality.
  • Iteration: One round of user testing is not enough — You need to continually study your customers to see how they’re reacting to your product and how their needs are changing.
  • 4D listening: Try to see past the surface of what your customers are saying to what they’re truly asking of you. Your customers may not be able to envision the more practical solutions that your product team conceives.

Risk management
Is it risky to transform your enterprise? Of course! The key to success is creating the expectation that innovation efforts are an iterative process. Successful innovation requires experiments, learning, persistence and, most importantly, the willingness to fail. Once you have alignment around the idea that some level of risk is necessary and appropriate, you can gain confidence from enterprise funders by envisioning the different types of risks your efforts might face and developing remediation strategies to combat those risks.

Organizational agility
As quickly as you can adapt, the digital world changes. Organizational agility is key to keeping up in the digital arena. There are five specific types of agility that are important for success in digital:

  • Sensing: This means knowing what’s going on around you so you can be aware of what actions might be required. How are customers, competitors and industry regulations changing, and what new technology exists that could impact your digital experiences?
  • Technology: Moving quickly from idea to live solution is important in supporting and growing your digital experience. Does your enterprise have technology stacks that are adaptable and easily maintained? Are your content and presentation capabilities accessible to your product owners and content managers?
  • Decision-making: Capital approval processes that take months to reach a final decision don’t work with the speed of digital. The people running your innovation projects need the autonomy and authority to make decisions on the ground-level so that they happen with the speed necessary to keep up with the digital world.
  • Strategy shifts: Embrace and expect that your innovation projects will go through a process of trial-and-error on their way to the kind of digital transformation success that you’re seeking.
  • Teaming: Despite a persistent myth, there is no one structure in which all digital work can be done by a single team of people operating under a single executive. The key to teaming agility is creating a culture with alignment across divisional silos, so that mobilization of the right people happens quickly and efficiently.

Transformation vision
Many organizations have a basic vision for growth: Optimize what already exists or expand upon current offerings. But to create a true transformation vision, one that encompasses your entire organization, you need to determine how the world is changing and how that will affect your customers’ needs. Only then can you determine what new products and services you can bring to market and the different channels you’ll need to deliver on them. You may even decide that the imminent changes will shift your focus to an entirely new set of customers! To be successful in the long-run, think in terms of transformation time so that you can get a few steps ahead.

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What is Field Service Management and Why Should You Care?

This week’s post were are pleased to share a mini info-graphic based on an article by Danny Wong from Salesforce.com. You can find the companion article here.


What is Field Service Management and Why Should You Care Infographic

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Augmented Reality State of the Art 

An Identification of Key Players 

ar-1

Considered to be one of the most defining technologies of our times, Augmented Reality(AR)  provides a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment and then augments (or supplements) this view with computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data. AR improves users’ experience by enabling them to interact and learn from whatever they are observing.  Deployment of AR tools within a field service environment can have a measurable improvement on key performance indicators (KPIs) related to quality, productivity, and efficiency such as Mean Time to Repair, First Time Fix Rate, and Mean Time Between Failure.

The implementation of an AR solution requires integration of multiple components which must all function together to make the solution work.  First there is the viewer technology. Most often this takes the form of Smart Glasses or a mobile device such as a tablet or smart phone.  Next is the application which allows the device to read what the field service engineer (FSE) is seeing live and produce the additional content whether it be sound, video, graphics or GPS data.  In addition, many AR experiences rely on video from the onsite FSE to a control center or remote support personnel with special information or skills to assist the onsite FSE in completing the job.  Often the communication is done using a mobile device such as a smart phone or tablet.

In this blog we examine some of the key players in the AR space who have developed both use case scenarios and actual solutions for maintenance and field service environments:

APX

APX’s Skylight is an AR enterprise platform which integrates with smart glasses or other wearables.   It allows field service engineers to receive in-view instructions and obtain remote assistance with video from a central control center. It also has the ability to capture information at the onsite location and receive live data feeds to aid in field service.

AR Media

I-Mechanic is an AR application for smartphones that enable consumers or mechanics to perform maintenance on automobiles.  In addition it can provide consumers with useful information on closest auto repair and parts stores.

Epson: Moverio- Augmented Reality Glasses

The Moverio product uses sensors to provide onsite 3D Augmented Reality assistance while detecting issues and seeing images of what exists inside the components.  Additionally it provides one way video to a “control room” providing other resources for the onsite technician to successfully complete repair. One of the use cases for the Moverio product is the inspection and repair of HVAC systems  on cruise ships.

Fieldbit

An AR software platform allows for both 3-D overlay of information and remote instruction/collaboration with experts using video and smart phone technology. It also provides the ability to catalog issues and capture technical information enabling users to log and track reasons for equipment failure. Fieldbit is currently being used in maintenance of Print Equipment Manufacturers, Medical Equipment Manufacturers, Utility Providers, and Industrial Machinery.  Fieldbit recently partnered with cloud based, field service management software vendor ClickSoftware  to deliver faster, more effective field service repair resolution once the workforce arrives on site.

iQagent

iQagent is a mobile-based AR application for plant floor maintenance.   It scans QR codes to provide maintenance related information such as process data, schematics, and other resource.   It can be customized to read an individual organizations data and information from its database.

Microsoft

HoloLens – AR glasses which can be purchased as part of a commercial suite allowing for customization for enterprise use.  Current partners include Volvo, NASA, Trimble, and others.

NGrain

NGrain consists of a suite of AR applications including:

ProProducer –  platform to create virtual training simulations;
Viewer – companion to ProProducer to view and use the virtual simulations;
Android Viewer – allows access to content created using ProProducer from Android devices;
SDK – allows building of 3-D imaging to provide AR experience including both surface of objects and what is inside and underneath.

NGrain has also developed a number of industrial applications for its AR suite of products including but not limited to:

Consort – for inspection and damage assessment;
Envoy – providing real-time updates and information to field service engineers and allows communication between technicians;
Scout – Use Case – Aircraft Repair shop floor – real time visual analysis with Floor Manager oversite improving efficiency.

PTC

ThingWorx Studio is an AR offering developed by PTC for use in Industrial Enterprise. It combines the power of Vuforia, an AR platform, with the ThingWorx IoT Platform. These technologies offer new ways for the industrial enterprise to create, operate, and service products. For example, this technology can be used to monitor machine conditions in real-time and provide step by step instructions on the operation, maintenance, and repair of these machines.

Scope AR

Scope AR offers several applications to facilitate an AR platform within a field service environment. The Worklink application allows 3-D images and instructions to pop up on mobile or wearable devices thus enhancing the FSE’s ability to get information on site. To see a video click here.

Remote AR  allows onsite technicians to interface with remote support personnel, sending video feed to allow for collaboration and assistance to the onsite maintenance team. To see a video click here.

XMReality

A Swedish company whose product, XM Reality Remote Guidance, allows onsite technicians to use video to connect to a central control center to receive visual instructions from qualified technicians with the information on how to fix the onsite problem. Their products include Smart Glasses, a Guide Station from which to provide the remote assistance, a tablet, interface with mobile phones, and a heavy duty casing for Microsoft Surface Pros to be used in the field.

Although the AR market is in its early growth stages, the vendor landscape for these solutions is already quite vast.   We anticipate that more vendors will emerge while others evolve into more robust solution providers as the market continues to mature. There are of course many other applications for AR as well outside of field service and maintenance such as retail, consumer, building and more.  We hope that you will join the conversation and let us know about your experience with these and other companies in this marketplace.

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What Do Pokémon Go and Service Lifecycle Management Have in Common?

pokemon-go-spec-625x351-300x168

Augmented Reality (AR) became a physical reality earlier this month when Nintendo launched its Pokémon Go application. This is the first example of a consumer based, augmented reality application that can be downloaded free on any Android or iOS device.  According to Vox Examiner, “Pokémon Go is a game that uses your phone’s GPS and clock to detect where and when you are in the game and make Pokémon “appear” around you (on your phone screen) so you can go and catch them. As you move around, different and more types of Pokémon will appear depending on where you are and what time it is. The idea is to encourage you to travel around the real world to catch Pokémon in the game.”

Many analysts believed that consumer applications for AR would not hit the market until 2017.   Nintendo was ahead of schedule.  Pokémon is taking the world by storm and fueling the market for  AR applications, a market that Digi-Capital reports will reach $90 billion by 2020.  Goldman Sachs estimates that 60% of the AR market will be driven by consumer applications, with the remaining 40% of the market attributable to enterprise usage.

In case you have not been paying attending to technology trends, AR provides a live direct or indirect view of a physical, real-world environment and then augments (or supplements) this view with computer-generated sensory input such as sound, video, graphics or GPS data.  The technology functions by enhancing one’s current perception of reality.  AR improves  users’ experience by enabling them to interact and learn from whatever they are observing.

Prior to the launch of Pokémon Go, AR applications where limited to the enterprise market.  I saw an example of a real-world-use case for AR at PTC’s LiveWorx ’16 last month in Boston.  At this conference and exhibition, PTC provided a proof of concept of how AR can be utilized within the context of Service Lifecycle Management.  In conjunction with their customer FlowServe, a leading manufacturer of pump and valves for process industries, PTC demonstrated an integrated solution which provides users with a better experience when it comes to operating, maintaining, and managing centrifugal pumps.  Sensors on the pump identify when an anomaly is detected.  Using AR, a virtual representation of the machine is placed on top of the device to expose the root cause of the problem.  AR is then utilized to identify the exact steps that need to be taken to resolve the problem.

By implementing AR solutions, companies can expect to realize significant improvements in key performance indicators related to Service Lifecycle Management.  For example, AR can help equipment operators anticipate and/or avoid machine failures and thus increase equipment uptime.  AR can also facilitate repair processes, thereby reducing both repair time and downtime while improving first time fix.  In addition, AR can improve the learning curve of novice field technicians, enabling them to become more proficient in diagnosing and resolving problems.  Furthermore, the contextual knowledge that is made available through AR enables equipment owners to make smarter decisions about operating the equipment, which  in turn can help extend the equipment’s life.

These results are only possible if field service technicians embrace AR and actively utilize it.  How likely are technicians to embrace this technology? This of course is the big question on people’s mind.  One scenario is that AR adoption will be very high, so high that technicians will become dependent on it.  The implication is that technicians will lose their domain expertise and be unable to resolve problems without it.  This could pose a challenge if for some reason the AR interface is not working properly and the machine still has a problem that requires resolution.  This outcome can be avoided through ongoing education, training, and skill-assessment drills.

A more likely scenario is that adoption rates will occur gradually.  Although technicians may embrace the use of AR in consumer applications, they may have some resistance to using it in a technical environment.  This is because AR requires technicians to modify their workflow and perceptions of themselves as problem solvers.  Technicians have been conditioned to rely on their own experience, intuition, and “tribal knowledge” to solve problems.  AR changes that basic premise.  Technicians will have to remember to activate AR applications when they are in the field and rely on the information that is presented to them to complete the task at hand. They’ll also need to become proficient at analyzing and acting upon the information they observe.  These activities are not second nature and may take some getting used to for veteran technicians because it represents a different way of working and a challenge to their conventional way of thinking.  Companies that want to leverage the value of AR can overcome these challenges by managing technicians’ performance against key performance indicators (KPIs).  They can observe who on their team is using AR and evaluate the impact on performance. They can in turn incentivize and reward good performance as well as identify who needs more training and coaching on the use of AR.

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3D Printing and The Digitization Of Field Service

3D Printing

This blog post has been reprinted with the permission of Field Technologies Online.

3D printing has received a great deal of attention by the media in recent months as this technology is rapidly being adopted in a broad array of market segments. Also known as additive layer manufacturing (ALM), 3D printing creates items using computer-aided design (CAD) and then builds them by adding thin layers of powder, melted plastic, aluminum, or other materials on top of each other. 3D printing requires fewer traditional raw materials and produces up to 90 percent less waste then traditional manufacturing. As a result, 3D printing is less costly. Furthermore, 3D printing enables companies to compress the supply chain and cycle time associated with bringing products to market.

The Role Of 3D Printing In Field Service
Indeed, 3D printing is a hot market. According to Canalys Research, the global market for 3D printers is estimated to reach $20.2 billion by 2019. This represents a sixfold increase from 2014 when the market was only $3.3 billion. Fueling this growth is the fact that 3D printers are becoming more affordable and mainstream. Given this trend, it is no wonder that the field service industry is quickly developing use cases for this technology. One example is Siemens, which uses 3D printing to make replacement parts for gas turbines. Rather than waiting weeks for an ordered spare part to arrive, Siemens can print the part and ship same day. As a result, Siemens has lowered repair time by 90 percent, which means less downtime per customer when it comes to gas turbines.

Another use case that has been proposed involves equipping service vans with 3D printers, permitting field engineers to print replacement parts on demand. This may not be practical or feasible. Many companies are moving toward variable workforce models and cutting back on company-owned vehicles. Even though 3D printing is faster than traditional manufacturing, it still requires a lot of time to print certain types of parts. This means that service calls would be extended, leading to longer customer downtime and lower productivity for the field service organization (FSO). 3D printing is also not a one-size-fits-all solution and can’t print complex parts. 3D printers vary according to the types of additive manufacturing methods employed, the types of materials utilized, and the size of the product manufactured. Unless all replacement parts have the same specifications, an FSO would need to install multiple printers in each van, which would add to the balance sheet and overhead expense structure of FSOs.

Despite these shortcomings, the concept of pushing the 3D printing closer to the customer and shortening the supply chain is very compelling. To capitalize on this idea, UPS has launched a full-scale, on-demand 3D printing manufacturing network. This network will leverage UPS’ existing global logistics network by embedding the On-Demand Production Platform and 3D Printing Factory from Fast Radius in 60 of UPS’ U.S.-based The UPS Store locations. UPS will also partner with SAP to build an end-to-end offering that marries SAP’s supply chain software with UPS’ on-demand manufacturing and global logistics network. This will simplify the production process from parts digitization and certification, order-to-manufacturing, and delivery. Now UPS’ customers can manufacture parts in the quantity they need, when they need them, and where they need them.

One of the most fascinating aspects of this solution is that instead of trying to force innovation (i.e., 3D printing) into our traditional way of thinking about spare parts management (i.e., in-house parts networks), UPS has turned service parts logistics into an on-demand economy business a la Uber. Under this model, the value for the FSO is not in the physical assets it manages (e.g., parts, 3D printers), but in the digital assets (e.g., designs, drawings, etc.) it owns. Eventually, developments in nanotechnology will enable 3D printing of all types of parts, even complex ones like microprocessors and capacitors. This creates the potential for FSOs to transform themselves into asset-light businesses. As a result they can deliver a better return on investment, lower profit volatility, greater flexibility, and higher scalability, things that weren’t possible a few years ago. UPS is of course an early entrant to the on-demand market for 3D printing. Look for more companies to offer similar solutions in the near future.

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Why Businesses Need to Adopt Mobile Marketing Plans Today

mobile marketing

This guest blog post was written by Sophorn Chhay. Sophorn is the marketing guy at Trumpia, the most complete SMS software with mass mobile messaging, smart targeting and automation. Follow Sophorn on Twitter(@Trumpia)

Each year, mobile marketing grows stronger. The world currently hosts over 3.65 billion unique smartphone users. Industries are expanding rapidly, facilitating the consumer’s need for deep, dynamic mobile connectivity.

To stand out, companies need to rework communicative and marketing outreaches to play upon mobile’s far-reaching impact. Creating a winning campaign takes time, but actionable plans certainly exist. Check out the following reasons companies are opting for smartphone support, and double-check your brand’s strategy for a watertight platform capable of harnessing the power of mobile.

One: Mobile Interaction Boosts Reaction

In the past, Internet-based content was vital to a modern marketer’s toolkit. Businesses now, however, are relying on mobile contact for interaction. 58 percent of consumers experiencing one-way communication tell their friends and family about it. Dynamic feedback has become the norm, and real-time SMS strategies, strategically media outreach and mobile web support are laying the future’s foundation.

Two: Mobile Coupons are Highly Redeemable

In 2015, SMS-delivered coupons experienced an open rate 10 times higher than printed coupons. Mobile coupons are highly convenient, and their discounts are commonly sought by day-to-day consumers. Because SMS, again, is a two-way street, brands can create custom-tailored offers. Mobile coupons both attract and retain customers, opening the doors to ongoing loyalty rewards.

Three: Mobile Apps are Taking Over

Mobile apps have become preferred engagement platforms in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of American buyers are considered to be “mobile app addicts.” They install, on average, 17 apps per month. The mobile marketing industry’s inclination to boost customer involvement via apps is telling of the mobile world’s overall health. Mobile apps are quickly becoming advertisement breeding grounds, and companies holding an app-centric course are prospering.

Four: SMS is a Preferred Communication Platform

Over 205 billion emails are sent daily. Unfortunately, they’re being ignored for text messages. While email open rates vary by industry, most companies experience an average open rate of 20 to 40 percent. Texts, however, experience an astounding 90 percent open rate. Consumers are reading texts, and they’re engaging brands at deep, intuitive levels. After 2016, brands unable to enchant buyers by way of text will be more than a few steps behind. Sure, email is still a viable marketing tool, but it fails to compete against SMS’s inherent communicative power.

Five: MMS is Even Better than SMS

MMS messages strike more conversations than SMS messages do. Many mobile marketers are redefining their strategies upon media-centric engagement strategies. Viral videos offered through Facebook and YouTube might be effective—but few platforms can compete with texting.

MMS content is highly shareable. It’s preferred by mobile marketing’s biggest fan-base, too. Millennials are viewing, sharing, voting on and even creating mobile video content. While Snapchat sparked much of the MMS craze, it’s currently unable to content with several of the business world’s creative initiatives. Branded SMS messages have a limit of 160 characters, while MMS messages can jam-pack thousands of words within a single video. Check out this article, and find out how your MMS strategy compares to baseline SMS approaches.

It’s important to understand the mobile world’s trajectory. The Internet of Things, alongside much of the business world’s contingency on immediacy, has made smartphone-centric marketing incomparable. Your brand, your workers, your strategy and your consumer base need mobile connectivity. The smartphone has created a paradigm shift, and it’s hitting the professional world hard. Double-check your strategy, find a gap for mobile and expand a smartphone-centric plan from within.

What’s Next?

What do you think of what I’ve covered so far? Will you adopt mobile as your tool for marketing?  I would love to read your comments below.

Jumpstart your business by grabbing your free copy of Sophorn’s powerful Mobile Marketing Success Kit.